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Marketing of and trade in fishery and aquaculture products in the EU

14-07-2020

The European Union is the world's largest market for fishery and aquaculture products, with a total value of extra-EU imports and exports reaching €26.6 billion in 2018. The consumption of fish in the EU exceeded 24 kg per capita in 2017, with the highest consumption levels in Portugal and Spain. In terms of production, the EU-27, excluding the United Kingdom, ranks sixth globally. This includes catches taken by EU vessels on the high seas and in the waters of third countries. The EU's self sufficiency ...

The European Union is the world's largest market for fishery and aquaculture products, with a total value of extra-EU imports and exports reaching €26.6 billion in 2018. The consumption of fish in the EU exceeded 24 kg per capita in 2017, with the highest consumption levels in Portugal and Spain. In terms of production, the EU-27, excluding the United Kingdom, ranks sixth globally. This includes catches taken by EU vessels on the high seas and in the waters of third countries. The EU's self sufficiency ratio of 43 % in fishery and aquaculture products is rather low. As a result, internal demand is primarily met through imports. To ensure the supply of fish to the EU fish-processing industry, import duties are removed or reduced for a number of fishery products up to a specific annual import volume. In addition, products can enter the EU market, at zero or a reduced rate of duty, from countries with which the EU has a free trade agreement in force, or from developing countries that can export to the EU under the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). In addition to tariffs, fish imports are subject to EU food hygiene regulations, which set out sanitary and phytosanitary requirements, and the EU's common fisheries policy (CFP). The CFP requirements include EU marketing standards − covering freshness and size categories − and specific labelling requirements that go beyond those required for other food products, for example the obligation to indicate the catch area and the main fishing gear used. Other market areas regulated by the EU cover the support and organisation of professional bodies and exemptions to competition rules. On the one hand, most market intervention mechanisms, such as withdrawal schemes and reference prices, have been removed since the most recent reform of the CFP in 2013. On the other hand, the EU fishing industry now has greater responsibility in the management of supply and demand. The submission of yearly production and marketing plans has become an obligation for all recognised producer organisations.

Plenary round-up – Brussels, April 2020

20-04-2020

For the second time since the introduction of strict coronavirus containment measures, the European Parliament conducted its April plenary session with the majority of Members participating remotely, and used the alternative voting procedure put in place by Parliament's Bureau for the March II session. This temporary voting procedure is available for use until 31 July 2020, unless extended by Bureau decision. As in March, the session focused on a number of urgent legislative proposals as well as ...

For the second time since the introduction of strict coronavirus containment measures, the European Parliament conducted its April plenary session with the majority of Members participating remotely, and used the alternative voting procedure put in place by Parliament's Bureau for the March II session. This temporary voting procedure is available for use until 31 July 2020, unless extended by Bureau decision. As in March, the session focused on a number of urgent legislative proposals as well as amendments to the EU's 2020 budget to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. Members also heard from the Presidents of the European Council and Commission on the coordination of the European response to the Covid-19 outbreak. Parliament then adopted a resolution setting out its position on the response to the pandemic and its consequences, ahead of the next video-conference meeting of EU Heads of State or Government, on 23 April. In this resolution, Members called for a massive economic recovery package, greater coordination on cross-border health threats, and condemned national emergency measures that restrict civil liberties.

Support for the fishing and aquaculture sectors in the coronavirus crisis

15-04-2020

Measures taken to limit the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, such as the closure of restaurants, open-air markets and limits on travel and tourism have had a strong impact on the food supply chain. Fisheries and aquaculture are among the sectors most immediately hit by the crisis. In order to alleviate the socio-economic impact, several measures have been or are in the process of being adopted by the EU. A number of emergency measures will help the fisheries and aquaculture sector, including increased ...

Measures taken to limit the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, such as the closure of restaurants, open-air markets and limits on travel and tourism have had a strong impact on the food supply chain. Fisheries and aquaculture are among the sectors most immediately hit by the crisis. In order to alleviate the socio-economic impact, several measures have been or are in the process of being adopted by the EU. A number of emergency measures will help the fisheries and aquaculture sector, including increased possibilities for State aid and the introduction of support measures through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Fisheries

28-06-2019

The European Union has sole responsibility for the conservation of its marine fisheries resources, and manages them under the common fisheries policy (CFP). Launched in 1983 and reformed every ten years since then, the CFP has come a long way. The current framework, resulting from the 2013 CFP reform, is aimed at ensuring that EU fisheries are sustainable – environmentally, economically and socially. The CFP has a dedicated financial instrument – the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) – ...

The European Union has sole responsibility for the conservation of its marine fisheries resources, and manages them under the common fisheries policy (CFP). Launched in 1983 and reformed every ten years since then, the CFP has come a long way. The current framework, resulting from the 2013 CFP reform, is aimed at ensuring that EU fisheries are sustainable – environmentally, economically and socially. The CFP has a dedicated financial instrument – the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) – with a budget of €6.4 billion for the 2014-2020 period. The 2013 reform introduced the target to achieve exploitation of all stocks at sustainable levels by 2020, and provided several major tools to support progress towards this goal. In particular, adoption of multiannual plans has become a priority, to ensure long-term management of stocks. An obligation to land all catches was designed to end the practice of discarding fish back into the sea. The reform also introduced regionalisation of decision-making, with the possibility to adopt conservation measures based on joint recommendations by the Member States concerned. Implementation of the reformed CFP was the main feature of the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, with legislative work making headway on several important topics. A series of multiannual plans have been launched, and four of them, concerning fisheries in the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, the Western Waters and the western Mediterranean, are now in force. The landing obligation has been phased in, as scheduled, from 2015 to 2019. The EU adopted an updated framework for collection of fisheries data to support management decisions, as well as a new system of fishing authorisations improving the monitoring of EU vessels fishing outside EU waters. EU activities have also covered different aspects of the CFP's external dimension, such as conclusion of fisheries agreements with third countries, and participation in international fisheries governance. In the future, further progress is expected on issues such as adoption of multiannual plans and the revision of the fisheries control system. The EMFF will be renewed as part of the next EU multiannual budget for 2021-2027. Taking stock of progress made in implementing the latest reform and achieving its objectives, with a view to future CFP developments, will also be on the agenda. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Research for PECH Committee - Implementation and impact of key European Maritime and Fisheries Fund measures (EMFF) on the Common Fisheries Policy, and the post-2020 EMFF proposal

15-01-2019

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

This Report is a research on the current performance of the shared management component of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) and its impact on the Common Fisheries Policy. Based on quantitative data collection as well as on interviews with Managing Authorities of Member States and stakeholders, the Report also analyses the legislative proposal for the post-2020 EMFF and seeks to support the Members of the PECH Committee of the EU Parliament in their consideration.

Externe auteur

CETMAR, Spain: Marta Ballesteros, Rosa Chapela, Jose L. Santiago, Mariola Norte-Navarro - COGEA, Italy: Anna Kęsicka, Alessandro Pititto, Ugo Abbagnano, Giuseppe Scordella

Research for PECH Committee - Fisheries in Vietnam

30-11-2018

Vietnam is located in Southeast Asia on the eastern Indochina Peninsula, with a population just over 93.6 million, it is the eighth-most-populous Asian country. There are four main fishing areas in Vietnam: the Gulf of Tonkin, shared with China; the Central area; the South-eastern area; and the South-western area (part of the Gulf of Thailand), shared with Cambodia and Thailand. According to the 2016 report of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), Vietnam is the third ...

Vietnam is located in Southeast Asia on the eastern Indochina Peninsula, with a population just over 93.6 million, it is the eighth-most-populous Asian country. There are four main fishing areas in Vietnam: the Gulf of Tonkin, shared with China; the Central area; the South-eastern area; and the South-western area (part of the Gulf of Thailand), shared with Cambodia and Thailand. According to the 2016 report of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), Vietnam is the third largest seafood exporter worldwide after China and Norway before Thailand and India.

Research for PECH Committee - Fisheries in Ireland

14-09-2018

This overview of the fisheries sector in the Republic of Ireland (henceforth: Ireland) provides information for the delegation of the PECH committee to the country (Cork, 17-19 September 2018).

This overview of the fisheries sector in the Republic of Ireland (henceforth: Ireland) provides information for the delegation of the PECH committee to the country (Cork, 17-19 September 2018).

Research for PECH Committee - Åland Islands

15-05-2018

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the ...

The Åland Islands is an autonomous, demilitarised, Swedish-speaking region of Finland. The archipelago has its own government and parliament. The Åland Islands is a small society with an open economy that is dependent on trade with its neighbouring regions, notably Southern Finland and the Stockholm region. In 2017 the Åland Islands had 6 aquaculture facilities operating. The number of employed persons in the aquaculture sector was 95 people in that same year. The number of employed persons in the fishing sector in the Åland Islands amounted to 88 persons in 2016.

Fish labelling for consumers

12-10-2017

Since the end of 2014, consumers in the European Union (EU) have had access to better information when buying fishery and aquaculture products. Mandatory labels or markings for retail sale of seafood (including some types of processed seafood) must, in particular, include information on both the commercial and the scientific names of the species, whether it has been fished or farmed, the catch area or country of production, and the fishing gear used.

Since the end of 2014, consumers in the European Union (EU) have had access to better information when buying fishery and aquaculture products. Mandatory labels or markings for retail sale of seafood (including some types of processed seafood) must, in particular, include information on both the commercial and the scientific names of the species, whether it has been fished or farmed, the catch area or country of production, and the fishing gear used.

Aquaculture in the EU

03-10-2017

Aquaculture means the rearing of aquatic animals and the cultivation of aquatic plants and algae. While, at global level, this industry has undergone significant growth for several decades, in the EU, aquaculture production, focused on the farming of fish and shellfish for human consumption, is rather stagnating. Subject to diverse EU policies, such as environmental protection or animal and consumer health, the development of aquaculture largely depends on measures taken by national authorities. ...

Aquaculture means the rearing of aquatic animals and the cultivation of aquatic plants and algae. While, at global level, this industry has undergone significant growth for several decades, in the EU, aquaculture production, focused on the farming of fish and shellfish for human consumption, is rather stagnating. Subject to diverse EU policies, such as environmental protection or animal and consumer health, the development of aquaculture largely depends on measures taken by national authorities. The EU common fisheries policy requests Member States to put in place a strategic plan for sustainable aquaculture, which can be fostered with the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund.

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