25

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Online platforms: Economic and societal effects

10-03-2021

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered ...

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered a public debate on online platforms’ economic dominance and patterns of pervasive data collection. The report provides evidence of positive impact, and documents a set of important issues not fully addressed by existing European regulation and enforcement. The consensus is that there is a need to strengthen the current law enforcement and regulation of the platform economy. This report welcomes the proposed Digital Markets and Digital Services Acts, and offers a series of policy options for competition and innovation, working conditions and labour markets, consumer and societal risks, and environmental sustainability.

Externe auteur

DG, EPRS_This study has been written by Professor Annabelle Gawer, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey (main author), Dr Nick Srnicek, King's College London, at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Barriers to Competition through Joint Ownership by Institutional Investors

15-10-2020

In recent years, the phenomenon of common ownership by institutional investors has sparked considerable debate about its impact on competition and companies’ corporate governance. The original full study analyses some specific features of common ownership by institutional investors in the European banking sector, at the intersection between competition policy, financial sector regulation and corporate governance rules. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and ...

In recent years, the phenomenon of common ownership by institutional investors has sparked considerable debate about its impact on competition and companies’ corporate governance. The original full study analyses some specific features of common ownership by institutional investors in the European banking sector, at the intersection between competition policy, financial sector regulation and corporate governance rules. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON).

Externe auteur

S. FRAZZANI, K. NOTI, M. P. SCHINKEL, J. SELDESLACHTS, A. BANAL ESTAÑOL, N. BOOT, C. ANGELICI

Three critical issues in EU-UK relations

08-06-2020

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal ...

Following the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) on 1 February 2020, the EU and the UK launched negotiations on a new partnership agreement, to come into effect at the end of the transition period, scheduled for 31 December 2020. The negotiations are intended to address nearly all the domains covered in the Political Declaration negotiated by both parties alongside the Withdrawal Agreement, including trade and economics, fisheries, thematic cooperation, and internal and external security. As far as negotiations on the future economic relationship are concerned, while the parties agree in principle on an exceptional zero-tariff and zero-quota comprehensive and balanced free trade agreement (FTA) aiming for as 'frictionless' trade as possible, they still disagree on major aspects of the economic partnership, especially fisheries and level playing-field (LPF) commitments. The EU wants the future agreement in the fisheries domain to retain the status quo as far as possible, including reciprocal access to waters in return for access to markets and quota-shares that are based on historical fishing patterns. The EU also insists that an effective LPF would ensure fair competition. After the third round of talks, which took place in May 2020, the UK's chief negotiator, David Frost, said that the EU proposal on fisheries was ‘simply not realistic’, and it was unacceptable that the LPF binds the UK to EU law or standards; if need be, the UK would aim for a less ambitious FTA. The EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, said that negotiating an FTA providing for tariffs would be far more time-consuming, and the EU would still demand the same LPF commitments because 'open and fair competition is not a "nice-to-have", it is a "must-have" '. Following the fourth round of negotiations, from 2 to 5 June, the positions therefore still seemed irreconcilable. However, the long stand-off in the earlier negotiations on UK withdrawal had seemed equally irreconcilable before the final agreement was reached and then ratified. One area in which the two sides did manage to agree in those negotiations is the financial settlement included in the Withdrawal Agreement. While that settlement is now being implemented, it had initially been seen as one of the more difficult areas of the withdrawal negotiations.

Barriers to Competition through Joint Ownership by Institutional Investors

15-05-2020

In recent years, the phenomenon of common ownership by institutional investors has sparked considerable debate among scholars about its impact on competition and companies’ corporate governance. This study analyses some specific features of common ownership by institutional investors in the European banking sector. It also examines closely the tension between competition policy and corporate governance tools aimed at enhancing shareholder engagement. This document was provided by the Policy Department ...

In recent years, the phenomenon of common ownership by institutional investors has sparked considerable debate among scholars about its impact on competition and companies’ corporate governance. This study analyses some specific features of common ownership by institutional investors in the European banking sector. It also examines closely the tension between competition policy and corporate governance tools aimed at enhancing shareholder engagement. This document was provided by the Policy Department for Economic, Scientific and Quality of Life Policies at the request of the committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON).

Externe auteur

S. FRAZZANI, K. NOTI, M. P. SCHINKEL, J. SELDESLACHTS, A. BANAL ESTAÑOL, N. BOOT, C. ANGELICI

Competition issues in the Area of Financial Technology (FinTech): Study presentation

04-04-2019

The study presented in this event deals with the new competition challenges brought about by the increasing number of FinTech services, which are provided by newcomer start-ups, traditional financial institutions and big tech companies. Namely, network effects derived from the use of online-platforms, the use of customer data, algorithms, standardisation and interoperability can result in anticompetitive behaviour. The analysis takes a service-by-service approach to provide both, a descriptive breakdown ...

The study presented in this event deals with the new competition challenges brought about by the increasing number of FinTech services, which are provided by newcomer start-ups, traditional financial institutions and big tech companies. Namely, network effects derived from the use of online-platforms, the use of customer data, algorithms, standardisation and interoperability can result in anticompetitive behaviour. The analysis takes a service-by-service approach to provide both, a descriptive breakdown and normative tools to anticipate and manage anticompetitive behaviours as they occur. This presentation was prepared by Policy Department A at the request of the ECON Committee.

Externe auteur

David RAMOS MUÑOZ Juan Pablo VILLAR GARCÍA et al.

New rules for managing the EU external fishing fleet

15-02-2018

The European Parliament and the Council have adopted a new Regulation on the sustainable management of external fishing fleets, which replaces the 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and covers all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The regulation revised the system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, so as to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. It extended the scope of the authorisation ...

The European Parliament and the Council have adopted a new Regulation on the sustainable management of external fishing fleets, which replaces the 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and covers all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The regulation revised the system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, so as to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. It extended the scope of the authorisation system to include practices such as private agreements between EU companies and third countries, and abusive reflagging operations. Member States are required to authorise fishing vessels using common eligibility criteria, complemented by specific conditions depending on the nature of the authorisation. Part of the electronic fishing authorisations register, showing who fishes for what and where, will for the first time be publicly accessible. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 608.651, July 2017.

EU electronic communications code and co-investment: Taking stock of the policy discussion

05-02-2018

The EU regulatory framework on electronic communications sets common rules on how electronic communications networks and services such as telephony and internet broadband connections are regulated in the European Union (EU). While the revision of this framework has started, a debate arises on how best to foster investment in the EU for deploying the very high capacity networks that are increasingly needed for 5G mobile services, as well as e-services such as e health, e administration, cloud computing ...

The EU regulatory framework on electronic communications sets common rules on how electronic communications networks and services such as telephony and internet broadband connections are regulated in the European Union (EU). While the revision of this framework has started, a debate arises on how best to foster investment in the EU for deploying the very high capacity networks that are increasingly needed for 5G mobile services, as well as e-services such as e health, e administration, cloud computing and connected cars. One of the proposals of the European Commission is to amend the current regulatory framework in order to facilitate co-investment (i.e. when several investors agree to invest together) for building new high-capacity network infrastructure. However, the European Parliament and Council both want to amend the text significantly. This briefing discusses the policy context and the rationale behind the rules on co investment proposed in the draft EU electronic communications code, and assesses the main areas of convergence and divergence between the initial positions of the co legislators. Furthermore, some key issues for discussion are highlighted, including what types of co-investment agreements and assets should be exempted from regulation, the degree of competition safeguards needed and the extent of national regulators' oversight of the co-investment projects.

COMPETITION POLICY AND AN INTERNAL ENERGY MARKET

15-12-2017

This note, prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, summarises the main points presented by the study on Competition policy and an internal energy market with a view to achieve an effectively working internal market in this sector.

This note, prepared by Policy Department A for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, summarises the main points presented by the study on Competition policy and an internal energy market with a view to achieve an effectively working internal market in this sector.

Safeguarding competition in air transport

20-11-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 June 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN). The proposal intends to repeal Regulation (EC) No 868/2004 in order to 'ensure a fair level playing field between European and third country air carriers’ (IA, p. 44), ‘with a view to maintain conditions conducive to a high level of connectivity ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 8 June 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN). The proposal intends to repeal Regulation (EC) No 868/2004 in order to 'ensure a fair level playing field between European and third country air carriers’ (IA, p. 44), ‘with a view to maintain conditions conducive to a high level of connectivity' (explanatory memorandum, p. 8). According to the IA, 'Regulation (EC) No 868/2004 intended to protect EU air carriers against objectively defined practices considered as "unfair" and "discriminatory", namely subsidisation and unfair pricing practices causing injury to EU carriers in the supply of air services to and from third countries' (IA, p. 34). However, for the reasons comprehensively outlined in the IA (pp. 34-36), the regulation 'has never been applied, and some of its features make it very unlikely that it will ever be (concretely) applied' (explanatory memorandum, p. 3). The proposal is part of the 'Open and Connected Aviation' package, which includes three other initiatives. The European Parliament has called for the revision of this regulation in a number of its resolutions, as it had proved inadequate and ineffective. The Council, in its conclusions adopted on 20 December 2012, called for a more ambitious and robust EU external aviation policy, based on the principles of reciprocity and open and fair competition in a level playing field. It considered that this regulation had proved itself unable to adequately address the specific characteristics of the aviation services sector and supported the Commission's intention to analyse possible options for a more effective instrument to safeguard open and fair competition. It also encouraged the Commission and Member States to 'use their bilateral and multilateral relations to actively support the establishment of a level playing field favouring open and fair competition in international air transport' (Recital 24, p. 4).

New rules for managing the EU external fishing fleet

19-07-2017

Following trilogue negotiations, the Parliament is to be asked to approve in plenary a revised system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, intended to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. The new legislation will replace the current 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and will cover all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The current scope of the authorisation system would be extended to ...

Following trilogue negotiations, the Parliament is to be asked to approve in plenary a revised system of issuing and managing fishing authorisations, intended to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. The new legislation will replace the current 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, and will cover all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, as well as third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The current scope of the authorisation system would be extended to include practices poorly monitored so far, such as private agreements between EU companies and third countries and abusive reflagging operations. Member States would authorise fishing vessels using common eligibility criteria, complemented by specific conditions depending on the nature of the authorisation. Part of the electronic fishing authorisations register, showing who fishes what and where, would for the first time be publicly accessible. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 595.886, January 2017.

Toekomstige activiteiten

21-06-2021
Ensuring effective protection of European consumers in the digital economy
Hoorzitting -
IMCO
22-06-2021
AFCO ICM on the Reform of European Electoral Law & Parliament's Right of Inquiry
Diverse activiteiten -
AFCO
22-06-2021
The development of new tax practices:what new schemes should the EU pay attention to?
Hoorzitting -
FISC

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