79

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Fintech (financial technology) and the European Union: State of play and outlook

12-02-2019

The financial technology (fintech) sector encompasses firms that use technology-based systems either to provide financial services and products directly, or to make the financial system more efficient. Fintech is a rapidly growing sector: in the first half of 2018, investment in fintech companies in Europe alone reached US$26 billion. The fintech sector brings rewards including innovation and job creation, but also challenges, such as data and consumer protection issues, and the risk of exacerbating ...

The financial technology (fintech) sector encompasses firms that use technology-based systems either to provide financial services and products directly, or to make the financial system more efficient. Fintech is a rapidly growing sector: in the first half of 2018, investment in fintech companies in Europe alone reached US$26 billion. The fintech sector brings rewards including innovation and job creation, but also challenges, such as data and consumer protection issues, and the risk of exacerbating financial volatility or cybercrime. To tackle these multi-disciplinary challenges, policy- and lawmakers in the European Union (EU) have adopted and announced several initiatives, for instance on intra-EU payment services, data protection, crowdfunding and regulatory sandboxes. This briefing outlines current and upcoming fintech-related laws at EU level. It follows on from a March 2017 EPRS briefing that focused, inter alia, on the evolution, scope and economic prospects of fintech.

Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC)

31-01-2019

On 14 September 2016, the European Commission proposed an updated regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC). The proposal aims at transforming BEREC into a fully fledged agency. The Commission proposes allocating new tasks to BEREC and granting it legally binding powers. New tasks include providing guidelines for national regulatory authorities (NRAs) on geographical surveys, developing common approaches to meet end-user interests, and also developing common ...

On 14 September 2016, the European Commission proposed an updated regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC). The proposal aims at transforming BEREC into a fully fledged agency. The Commission proposes allocating new tasks to BEREC and granting it legally binding powers. New tasks include providing guidelines for national regulatory authorities (NRAs) on geographical surveys, developing common approaches to meet end-user interests, and also developing common approaches to deliver peer-reviewed opinions on draft national measures (e.g. radio spectrum assignments) and on cross-border disputes. In June 2018, Parliament and Council found a compromise in trilogue. The BEREC office will have legal personality, but not BEREC itself, which remains a body of NRAs. Parliament and Council also agreed on giving new tasks to BEREC and on moving from simple majority to two-thirds majority for key decisions of the Board of Regulators and of the Management Board. The final act was signed on 10 December 2018, and entered into force on 20 December 2018. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

The new European electronic communications code

16-01-2019

European telecom rules were last updated in 2009. To make them fit for the digital era the Commission proposed a new Electronic Communications Code in September 2016. The provisional agreement reached in June 2018 was adopted by the Parliament and then by the Council in November 2018. Member States have until 21 December 2020 to transpose the new directive into national legislation. The new rules include measures to stimulate investment in and take-up of very high capacity networks in the EU as well ...

European telecom rules were last updated in 2009. To make them fit for the digital era the Commission proposed a new Electronic Communications Code in September 2016. The provisional agreement reached in June 2018 was adopted by the Parliament and then by the Council in November 2018. Member States have until 21 December 2020 to transpose the new directive into national legislation. The new rules include measures to stimulate investment in and take-up of very high capacity networks in the EU as well as new spectrum rules for mobile connectivity and 5G. The Code also ensures that all citizens have access to affordable communication, including the internet. It increases consumer protection and security for users and facilitates regulatory intervention. Furthermore, it introduces a 'reverse 112 system' which would alert citizens by text message in case of imminent serious emergencies or disasters (from June 2022). During negotiations the Parliament secured for citizens cheaper caps for intra-EU calls and SMS from 15 May 2019. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Standard Essential Patents and the Internet of Things

15-01-2019

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, assesses the European Commission of (EC) Communication of 29 November 2017 on the EU approach to Standard Essential Patents. The report examines the principles identified in the Communication with respect to the Commission’s proposals on (i) increasing transparency on SEPs; (ii) determining valuation of SEPs( Standard Essential Patents ...

This in-depth analysis, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, assesses the European Commission of (EC) Communication of 29 November 2017 on the EU approach to Standard Essential Patents. The report examines the principles identified in the Communication with respect to the Commission’s proposals on (i) increasing transparency on SEPs; (ii) determining valuation of SEPs( Standard Essential Patents) and FRAND ( Fair, Reasonable, and Non-Discriminatory) terms; and (iii) enforcement. The report evaluates the efficient resolution of licensing disputes over FRAND, including via litigation, arbitration and mediation, licensing pools and collective licensing. The current document also puts forward some policy recommendations to, inter alia, enhance the general environment of FRAND licencing in the context of SEPs.

Externe auteur

Dr Luke MCDONAGH Dr Enrico BONADIO

The European Electronic Communications Code and BEREC

07-11-2018

In order to stimulate infrastructure investment and bring the EU telecom rules up to date with technological developments and changing consumer demands and habits, the European Commission put forward two legislative proposals in 2016: a directive establishing the European Electronic Communications Code and a regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC). The European Parliament is expected to vote during its November I plenary session on the texts agreed with ...

In order to stimulate infrastructure investment and bring the EU telecom rules up to date with technological developments and changing consumer demands and habits, the European Commission put forward two legislative proposals in 2016: a directive establishing the European Electronic Communications Code and a regulation on the Body of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC). The European Parliament is expected to vote during its November I plenary session on the texts agreed with the Council in trilogue negotiations.

Research for REGI Committee - Digital agenda and cohesion policy

15-06-2018

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between ...

This study provides a critical analysis of the contribution of Cohesion Policy and the European Structural Investment Funds to the Digital Agenda for Europe and the Digital Single Market. Based on the analysis of past and current patterns of ESIF digital investments and selected case studies, this study shows that Cohesion Policy should concentrate where its added value is highest, i.e., on support to the formulation of effective regional digital strategies and on the promotion of partnerships between relevant stakeholders, at regional level and beyond.

Externe auteur

CSIL: Julie PELLEGRIN, Louis COLNOT supported by: Łukasz ARENDT, Luca BISASCHI, Gelsomina CATALANO, Žilvinas MARTINAITIS, Giorgio MICHELETTI

EYE event - Quantum leaps: This time it's the EU!

16-05-2018

The European Commission has launched an ambitious €1 billion research initiative on quantum technology, which will contribute, among other things, to the development of quantum supercomputers; expected to surpass traditional supercomputers, these could dramatically improve the technology used in areas such as communication, computing and sensing.

The European Commission has launched an ambitious €1 billion research initiative on quantum technology, which will contribute, among other things, to the development of quantum supercomputers; expected to surpass traditional supercomputers, these could dramatically improve the technology used in areas such as communication, computing and sensing.

EYE event - Cyber-attacks: Not just a phantom menace

16-05-2018

Some 96 % of young people (and 70 % of citizens) in Europe use the internet every day. The young communicate, play, shop, learn and work online. While offering a galaxy of opportunities, the digital environment also has a dark side. Cybercrime knows no borders and cyber-attacks can take on various forms, targeting all kinds of things, ranging from our devices and wallets, to our way of life. How can we make our digital society more resilient and our cybersecurity stronger? How does the EU help us ...

Some 96 % of young people (and 70 % of citizens) in Europe use the internet every day. The young communicate, play, shop, learn and work online. While offering a galaxy of opportunities, the digital environment also has a dark side. Cybercrime knows no borders and cyber-attacks can take on various forms, targeting all kinds of things, ranging from our devices and wallets, to our way of life. How can we make our digital society more resilient and our cybersecurity stronger? How does the EU help us reinforce our cyber-preparedness and response?

The regions in the digital single market: ICT and digital opportunities for European regions

19-04-2018

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to ...

The digital economy is growing at seven times the rate of the rest of the economy. The European Commission estimates that completing the digital single market could contribute €415 billion per year to Europe's economy, create 3.8 million jobs and transform public services. In addition, many future jobs will require information and communications technologies (ICT) skills, rendering the process of acquiring digital skills an imperative. The European Commission has presented several initiatives to boost the use of ICT in Europe. The Digital Agenda for Europe, announced in 2010 in the framework of the Europe 2020 strategy, aimed at promoting economic recovery and improving social inclusion through a more digitally proficient Europe. The Digital Single Market strategy, introduced in 2015, complements the Digital Agenda for Europe. Achieving a digital single market will ensure that Europe maintains its position as a world leader in the digital economy, helping European companies to grow globally. In 2016, the European Commission adopted a new Skills Agenda for Europe which includes measures on the acquisition of digital skills. Although many of the digital single market priorities are primarily dealt with at national level, various initiatives can be explored at the local and regional level. Regions and cities can plan and pursue their own digital strategies in the interests of enhancing economic growth and to promote their citizens' wellbeing. Enhanced use of digital technologies can improve citizens' access to information and culture, promote open government, equality and non-discrimination. However, a number of challenges need to be addressed to fully reap the benefits of digitalisation. Personnel with ICT skills are still lacking in Europe and many European citizens are not adequately trained to carry out ICT-related tasks. In addition, broadband connectivity in some parts of Europe remains slow. Although certain EU regions and local authorities experiment with new technologies, not all of them have managed to provide a high-level range of digital services and ICT related activities. This briefing is an update of an earlier edition, published in October 2015.

The underlying causes of the digital gender gap and possible solutions for enhanced digital inclusion of women and girls

15-02-2018

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, attempts to reveal the links between the different factors (access, skills, socio-economic and cultural), which prevent women from having equal access to digital technology. It then suggests ways of dealing with online and offline inequalities to the effect of closing the digital gender gap and improving women’s and girls’ digital inclusion ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee, attempts to reveal the links between the different factors (access, skills, socio-economic and cultural), which prevent women from having equal access to digital technology. It then suggests ways of dealing with online and offline inequalities to the effect of closing the digital gender gap and improving women’s and girls’ digital inclusion and future technology-related career paths.

Externe auteur

MS KONSTANTINA DAVAKI

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