12

Resulta(a)t(en)

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Beleidsterrein
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Datum

Europees Parlement: Wetenswaardigheden

11-04-2018

Deze briefing, die door de Onderzoeksdienst van het Europees Parlement is gepubliceerd, is bedoeld om belangrijke wetenswaardigheden te verstrekken over het Europees Parlement, zowel over de huidige zittingsperiode 2014-2019 als over de zeven voorgaande zittingsperiodes sinds in juni 1979 rechtstreekse verkiezingen werden ingevoerd. Op de zeven volgende bladzijden zult u allerlei grafieken aantreffen over o.a.: • de huidige en vroegere samenstelling van het Europees Parlement; • het toegenomen aantal ...

Deze briefing, die door de Onderzoeksdienst van het Europees Parlement is gepubliceerd, is bedoeld om belangrijke wetenswaardigheden te verstrekken over het Europees Parlement, zowel over de huidige zittingsperiode 2014-2019 als over de zeven voorgaande zittingsperiodes sinds in juni 1979 rechtstreekse verkiezingen werden ingevoerd. Op de zeven volgende bladzijden zult u allerlei grafieken aantreffen over o.a.: • de huidige en vroegere samenstelling van het Europees Parlement; • het toegenomen aantal partijen dat vertegenwoordigd is in het Parlement en de ontwikkeling van de politieke fracties; • het stijgend aantal vrouwen dat in het Parlement zetelt; • de kiesstelsels die in de verschillende lidstaten worden gebruikt voor de verkiezingen van het Parlement; • de opkomstpercentages in vergelijking met de nationale verkiezingen; • de activiteiten van het Parlement in de zittingsperiode 2009-2014 en sinds de start van de huidige zittingsperiode; • de jaarlijkse kosten van het Parlement in vergelijking met andere parlementen; • een overzicht van de belangrijkste bestuursorganen van het Parlement. De briefing wordt regelmatig bijgewerkt tijdens de zittingsperiode 2014-2019 om rekening te houden met de jongste ontwikkelingen.

Plenary round-up – Strasbourg, October II 2017

27-10-2017

The highlights of the October II plenary session included a debate on the conclusions of the last European Council meeting and the presentation of a new agenda for EU leaders, as well as the presentation of the 2018 Commission work programme. Members paid tribute to Daphne Caruana Galizia, the Maltese journalist killed in a car bomb explosion on 16 October.

The highlights of the October II plenary session included a debate on the conclusions of the last European Council meeting and the presentation of a new agenda for EU leaders, as well as the presentation of the 2018 Commission work programme. Members paid tribute to Daphne Caruana Galizia, the Maltese journalist killed in a car bomb explosion on 16 October.

The Implementation of the Charter of Fundamental Rights in the EU institutional Framework

22-11-2016

The EU institutions are required take into account the Charter of Fundamental Rights in the design and implementation of legislation or of policies, both within law- and policymaking internal to the Union and in the external relations of the EU. This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs of the European Parliament, to examine how they discharge this duty: it looks ...

The EU institutions are required take into account the Charter of Fundamental Rights in the design and implementation of legislation or of policies, both within law- and policymaking internal to the Union and in the external relations of the EU. This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Constitutional Affairs of the European Parliament, to examine how they discharge this duty: it looks into the role of the Charter in the legislative process; in the economic governance of the Union; in the work of EU agencies; in the implementation of EU law by EU Member States; and, in the external relations of the Union, both in trade and investment policies and in the Common Foreign and Security Policy. It also analyses certain gaps in the judicial protection of the Charter and identifies measures through which the potential of the Charter could be further realized.

European Commission's 2016 Work Programme

15-01-2016

On 27 October 2015, the European Commission adopted its Work Programme for the year ahead (2016 CWP), and presented it to the European Parliament the same day. Based on the 10 political guidelines set out in mid-2014 by President Jean-Claude Juncker, it builds on the 'framework strategies' adopted by the Commission since entering office and places emphasis on the legislative measures and concrete follow-up actions needed to implement them. The 2016 CWP includes relatively few entirely new actions ...

On 27 October 2015, the European Commission adopted its Work Programme for the year ahead (2016 CWP), and presented it to the European Parliament the same day. Based on the 10 political guidelines set out in mid-2014 by President Jean-Claude Juncker, it builds on the 'framework strategies' adopted by the Commission since entering office and places emphasis on the legislative measures and concrete follow-up actions needed to implement them. The 2016 CWP includes relatively few entirely new actions. Most of the initiatives it contains have already been announced and fit into the framework strategies presented earlier; a few of them were to be presented before the end of 2015. The CWP also looks beyond 2016, providing for the necessary preparatory work, such as evaluations, consultations or impact assessments, for actions to be included in future work programmes. Confronted with major unexpected events dominating the political agenda, such as the migration crisis and, more recently, the major terrorist attacks in Paris, the Commission may be compelled, as in 2015, to adapt to emerging challenges, taking immediate action and/or accelerating implementation in certain areas (for example, with counter-terrorism measures). The EP had adopted a resolution in September 2015 setting out its recommendations for the forthcoming CWP. In that it called on the Commission to use its right of initiative to the full extent, in order to give the Union clear leadership, reaffirmed its attachment to the ‘Community method’ and welcomed progress in the negotiations on a new inter-institutional agreement on better law-making, since completed.

Combating Child Sexual Abuse Online

16-12-2015

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse. The study also provides an account of the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives. Some of the current ...

This study was commissioned by the European Parliament's Policy Department for Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee. The study provides an overview of existing legislation at European Union, Member State and the international level related to online child sexual abuse. The study also provides an account of the role of law enforcement agencies in combatting child sexual abuse online and other governmental and private sector initiatives. Some of the current trends and phenomena related to online child sexual abuse and various policy responses are discussed, complemented with recommendations for future policy formulation.

Externe auteur

Petra JENEY (European Centre for Judges and Lawyers, European Institute of Public Administration - EIPA, Luxembourg)

Action Plan on Building a Capital Markets Union: EU securitisation framework: Initial Appraisal of a European Commission Impact Assessment

09-11-2015

This briefing seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment (IA) accompanying two Commission proposals for Regulations referred to Parliament’s Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs : Regulation laying down common rules on securitisation and creating a European framework for simple, transparent and standardised securitisation (COM (2015) 472); and Regulation amending Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 on prudential requirements ...

This briefing seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment (IA) accompanying two Commission proposals for Regulations referred to Parliament’s Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs : Regulation laying down common rules on securitisation and creating a European framework for simple, transparent and standardised securitisation (COM (2015) 472); and Regulation amending Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 on prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms (COM (2015) 473) Securitisation refers to the process of packaging and converting loans into securities that can be sold to investors. The Commission recognises that securitisation of US subprime mortgages was one of the causes of the last financial crisis, but believes that properly structured securitisation can play a positive role in the EU economy. These are the first two legislative proposals of the Action Plan on Building a Capital Markets Union, one of the Commission's key priorities, aimed at strengthening the links between savings and growth. The European Parliament resolution of 9 July 2015 on Building a Capital Markets Union expressed support for an initiative in this field, as part of a broad variety of avenues to be explored to improve SME financing.  

Review Clauses in EU Legislation: A Rolling Check-List (Second edition)

09-06-2015

This check-list presents a comprehensive overview of “review clauses”, namely review, evaluation and reporting provisions contained in recent EU legislative acts and programmes. It is produced by the Policy Performance Appraisal Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the EP's in-house research service and think tank, as part of its work on the evaluation of EU law, policies and programmes.The European Parliament is strongly committed to the concept of Better Law-Making, and particularly ...

This check-list presents a comprehensive overview of “review clauses”, namely review, evaluation and reporting provisions contained in recent EU legislative acts and programmes. It is produced by the Policy Performance Appraisal Unit of the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS), the EP's in-house research service and think tank, as part of its work on the evaluation of EU law, policies and programmes.The European Parliament is strongly committed to the concept of Better Law-Making, and particularly to the effective use of ex-ante impact assessment and ex-post evaluation throughout the whole legislative cycle. It is in this spirit that the European Parliament has a particular interest in following the transposition, implementation and enforcement of EU law, EU programmes and international agreements, and more generally, monitoring the impact, operation, effectiveness and delivery of policy and programmes in practice.

How the EU budget is spent: Consumer programme

24-04-2015

EU consumer policy for the 2014-20 period is defined in the European Consumer Agenda, which is complemented in its financial aspects by the Consumer programme. The 2014-2020 programme has a budget of €188.8 million, corresponding to around €0.05 per consumer per year. The four key areas are: product safety; information, education and consumer advice; enhanced access to redress mechanisms for citizens; and better national enforcement of consumer rights.

EU consumer policy for the 2014-20 period is defined in the European Consumer Agenda, which is complemented in its financial aspects by the Consumer programme. The 2014-2020 programme has a budget of €188.8 million, corresponding to around €0.05 per consumer per year. The four key areas are: product safety; information, education and consumer advice; enhanced access to redress mechanisms for citizens; and better national enforcement of consumer rights.

A connected Digital Single Market - State of play and the way forward

26-01-2015

Information and communication technologies and the digital economy have the potential to improve Europe's productivity and create growth and jobs. The EU has been making efforts to help create a more integrated European digital economy since the mid-1990s. In 2010, the Commission added new momentum to the process, and with the launch of the Digital Agenda set out to reap the benefits of a digital single market for households and businesses. Despite a relatively high level of implementation of the ...

Information and communication technologies and the digital economy have the potential to improve Europe's productivity and create growth and jobs. The EU has been making efforts to help create a more integrated European digital economy since the mid-1990s. In 2010, the Commission added new momentum to the process, and with the launch of the Digital Agenda set out to reap the benefits of a digital single market for households and businesses. Despite a relatively high level of implementation of the actions on the Agenda and the adoption of numerous legislative initiatives, the Digital Single Market remains fragmented into 28 national markets, and the EU continues to lag behind its main international competitors. The new European Commission recognised these shortcomings and the potential of the internet economy to help Europe recover from the crisis, and so placed completion of the Digital Single Market high on its agenda to the extent that there is now a dedicated project team of 13 Commissioners. In its 2015 Work Programme, the Commission outlined its intentions to conclude work on key pending proposals and table new legislative and non-legislative initiatives in this promising but challenging policy field, however to what extent tangible results will be achieved remains to be seen.

European Commission's 2015 Work Programme

23-01-2015

On 16 December 2014 the newly appointed European Commission adopted its Work Programme for the year ahead (2015 CWP). Based on the political guidelines set out by its President, Jean-Claude Juncker, the Programme forms the basis for the Commission's work in putting these ten priorities into effect. The procedures and timetable governing the European Parliament's role in this annual exercise are well-established and are laid out in detail in the 2010 Framework Agreement between the European Parliament ...

On 16 December 2014 the newly appointed European Commission adopted its Work Programme for the year ahead (2015 CWP). Based on the political guidelines set out by its President, Jean-Claude Juncker, the Programme forms the basis for the Commission's work in putting these ten priorities into effect. The procedures and timetable governing the European Parliament's role in this annual exercise are well-established and are laid out in detail in the 2010 Framework Agreement between the European Parliament and Commission. Nonetheless, the current exercise takes place in a markedly different context to those in the past, notably as a result of the process by which the Commission President was nominated as candidate and elected to office being more transparent and political than before. This stemmed from the introduction of 'lead candidates' (Spitzenkandidaten) in the 2014 European election campaign, an innovation aimed at giving voters a more direct influence over the future political direction of the European executive. In comparison with previous years, the 2015 CWP contains relatively few new proposals (only 23), though it also lists a large number of pending proposals to be withdrawn or modified. This reflects the Commission's stated intention to concentrate its efforts on a smaller number of priorities such as jobs and growth, and to focus on initiatives where it feels that concrete results can be delivered in the near term. Initial reaction from within the EP to the 2015 CWP has been mixed. While a large number of Members have broadly welcomed the thrust towards a slimmed-down package focussing on essentials, concerns have been raised about various issues, notably the scope and content of proposed withdrawals. None of the resolutions tabled by the political groups on the 2015 CWP achieved the majority necessary for adoption at the January I part-session, so the EP has not adopted a formal position on the matter.

Toekomstige activiteiten

30-11-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | How to own the room (and the zoom) [...]
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
30-11-2020
Hearing on Future-proofing the Tourism Sector: Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
Hoorzitting -
TRAN
30-11-2020
LIBE - FEMM Joint Hearing: Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence
Hoorzitting -
FEMM LIBE

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