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Climate action in Germany: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling, also mirroring the EU pattern. Energy industries are the largest source of emissions, responsible for 29 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, by 2020 Germany was required to reduce its emissions by 14 % compared with 2005. However, the country exceeded its allocated emissions from 2016 to 2019. Germany's current 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (ESR) is to reduce emissions by 38 % from 2005 levels. According to the Commission's assessment of Germany's NECP, with the new proposed measures the reduction will fall short of the target by 3 percentage points. In 2019, renewable energy sources accounted for 17.4 % of gross final consumption, just 0.6 percentage points short of the target set for 2020. Following a court ruling on 24 March 2021, which found that the Climate Change Act was not aligned with fundamental rights, the German government announced its intention to strengthen its commitment, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2045. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in Croatia: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU average, though it is on a steady downward trend. The transport sector accounted for over a quarter of Croatia's total emissions in 2019. The Croatian building stock is also responsible for a significant share of total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 40 % between 2005 and 2019, reducing the sector's share of total emissions by six percentage points. The Croatian economy is heavily reliant on energy imports. Diversifying supply and reducing demand is seen as key to the transition process. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Croatia was allowed to increase emissions until 2020 but must reduce these emissions by 7 % relative to 2005 by 2030. Croatia achieved a 28.5 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 36.4 % share is focused mainly on photovoltaics, wind and biofuels. Measures to boost energy efficiency centre on building stock renovation and energy efficiency obligation schemes for energy suppliers. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Italy: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the 2005-2019 period, with the agricultural sector showing the lowest reductions. The transport and 'other emissions' sectors, including buildings, account for almost half of Italy's total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by 42 % between 2005 and 2019, leaving the sector in third place in terms of its share of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Italy reduced its emissions by 13 % by 2020 relative to 2005, and the country expects to reach the 2030 target of 33 %. Italy achieved an 18 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 30 % share is focused mainly on wind and solar power. Energy efficiency measures centre to a large extent on the building stock and transport sectors with support schemes for industry and households. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Luxembourg: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Luxembourg's final NECP is from May 2020. Luxembourg generates 0.34 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 period ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Luxembourg's final NECP is from May 2020. Luxembourg generates 0.34 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 period, with the exception of agriculture and the 'other emissions' sectors. The transport sector and the 'other emissions' sector, which includes services and buildings, account for 77 % of Luxembourg's total emissions. Manufacturing and construction is the third largest sector in terms of emissions, accounting for 9 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation Luxembourg was supposed to reduce emissions by 20 % by 2020, and the 2030 obligation is 40 %. Luxembourg however expects to achieve a 55 % emissions reduction by 2030 in sectors outside the emissions trading system. Luxembourg reached a 7 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019 and expects in part to use cooperation mechanisms to reach the 2030 target of 25 % RES. Energy efficiency measures include both support and obligation schemes for industry, building renovations and transport electrification.

Harnessing the new momentum in transatlantic relations: Potential areas for common action during the Biden presidency

10-06-2021

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action ...

The transatlantic relationship has been witnessing a significant injection of renewed enthusiasm and policy activity since Joe Biden became President of the United States in January 2021. This paper focuses on three important issues on the rapidly evolving transatlantic policy agenda, exploring their potential for generating, in effect, new 'common global goods' during the Biden presidency. First, it looks at pathways towards developing some kind of 'transatlantic green deal', taking climate action, trade and climate diplomacy in the round. Second, it analyses the comparative fabrics of US and European societies through the triple lens of violent extremism, the rule of law and technological disruption. Third, the prospects for 'crisis-proofing' the transatlantic space for the future are examined by looking at defence, health security and multilateralism. The paper also explores some potential avenues for closer transatlantic parliamentary cooperation, building on the already strong relationship between the European Parliament and the US Congress.

Biodiversity protection: Where do we stand?

04-06-2021

Based on Member States' reporting under the Birds and Habitats Directives, the backbone of European Union (EU) nature conservation policy, the latest assessment on the state of nature by the European Environment Agency shows that despite some encouraging developments, the overall picture remains bleak. Only 15 % of habitats and around 27 % of species protected under EU legislation have a good conservation status. An EU-wide assessment of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems found that, overall ...

Based on Member States' reporting under the Birds and Habitats Directives, the backbone of European Union (EU) nature conservation policy, the latest assessment on the state of nature by the European Environment Agency shows that despite some encouraging developments, the overall picture remains bleak. Only 15 % of habitats and around 27 % of species protected under EU legislation have a good conservation status. An EU-wide assessment of terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems found that, overall, the condition of ecosystems in the EU is unfavourable. Worldwide, most indicators of ecosystems and biodiversity show rapid decline. Targets set to tackle biodiversity loss by 2020, at both EU and global levels under the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), have not been met. Under the EU biodiversity strategy for 2030, part of the European Green Deal, the EU has therefore set itself new targets for the next decade. These include enlarging the current network of legally protected areas to cover at least 30 % of the EU's land area and 30 % of the EU's seas; and setting legally binding EU nature restoration targets to restore degraded ecosystems. The recent zero-pollution action plan for air, water and soil proposes additional commitments relevant to biodiversity protection. Parties to the CBD, including the EU, are due to meet on 11-24 October 2021 in China to agree on a post-2020 global biodiversity framework. The EU intends to push for global 2030 targets in line with the commitments set out in its biodiversity strategy and for a much stronger implementation, monitoring and review process. The issue of resource mobilisation will be an important one, especially in the context of the coronavirus crisis, affecting the funding available for biodiversity. On 28 May 2021, Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted an own-initiative report with recommendations to strengthen the EU biodiversity strategy for 2030. The vote in plenary is scheduled for the June I plenary session.

Trade policy for the Biodiversity Strategy 2030

03-06-2021

International trade influences biodiversity through scale, composition and technique effects. Land and sea use change alter natural habitats, while emissions from production and transportation contribute to climate change. Among exports, animal-based agri-food products are particularly land-intensive. Trade policy can play a role in tackling these problems through stronger enforcement of biodiversity-related provisions in trade agreements. The EU Biodiversity Strategy 2030 commits to better assessing ...

International trade influences biodiversity through scale, composition and technique effects. Land and sea use change alter natural habitats, while emissions from production and transportation contribute to climate change. Among exports, animal-based agri-food products are particularly land-intensive. Trade policy can play a role in tackling these problems through stronger enforcement of biodiversity-related provisions in trade agreements. The EU Biodiversity Strategy 2030 commits to better assessing trade agreements’ potential impact on biodiversity and to better enforce biodiversity-related provisions. The Trade Committee of the European Parliament has adopted an opinion on the trade aspects of the new strategy.

European climate law

03-06-2021

On 4 March 2020, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a European climate law, setting the objective for the EU to become climate-neutral by 2050 and establishing a framework for achieving that objective. On 17 September 2020, following an impact assessment presented in the 2030 climate target plan, the Commission amended the proposal to introduce the updated 2030 climate target of a net reduction of at least 55 % of the EU's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to 1990 levels ...

On 4 March 2020, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a European climate law, setting the objective for the EU to become climate-neutral by 2050 and establishing a framework for achieving that objective. On 17 September 2020, following an impact assessment presented in the 2030 climate target plan, the Commission amended the proposal to introduce the updated 2030 climate target of a net reduction of at least 55 % of the EU's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to 1990 levels. In the European Parliament, the proposal has been referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. The Parliament adopted its position on 6 October 2020, calling for a 60 % emission reduction by 2030 and for an independent, inter-disciplinary scientific advisory panel. Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the proposal on 21 April 2021. The agreement sets a 55 % net GHG emission target for 2030 (to be complemented by additional removals from the upcoming review of the LULUCF Regulation), an EU-wide climate neutrality target for 2050, and the aim to achieve negative emissions thereafter. It envisages the use of a GHG budget for setting the 2040 target and establishes a European Scientific Advisory Board on Climate Change. The Parliament is expected to vote on adopting the text before summer 2021. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Research for ANIT Committee: The practices of animal welfare during transport in third countries: an overview

31-05-2021

The purpose of this study is to review animal welfare practices during transport in and to third countries. It compares the practices, guidelines and tools used by main trading partners with the EU and European standards. It also provides concrete policy recommendations on how to improve the current EU legislation on animal welfare during transport, taking practices in third countries, reports from the Commission, scientific work, enforcement practices by competent authorities, and reports from NGOs ...

The purpose of this study is to review animal welfare practices during transport in and to third countries. It compares the practices, guidelines and tools used by main trading partners with the EU and European standards. It also provides concrete policy recommendations on how to improve the current EU legislation on animal welfare during transport, taking practices in third countries, reports from the Commission, scientific work, enforcement practices by competent authorities, and reports from NGOs into account. The study is based on survey and desk research. Recommendations are made to address the challenges identified

Externe auteur

Friedrich – Loeffler – Institut: Michael MARAHRENS and Isa KERNBERGER-FISCHER

Outcome of the special European Council meeting of 24-25 May 2021

27-05-2021

Following the forced landing of a Ryanair flight by Belarusian authorities on 23 May, Belarus became the central topic on the first day of the special European Council meeting of 24-25 May 2021. EU leaders strongly condemned the 'unprecedented and unacceptable incident', and were united in imposing further sanctions on Belarus. As regards Russia, the European Council reconfirmed the five principles guiding the EU's policy since 2016 and asked the High Representative and the European Commission to ...

Following the forced landing of a Ryanair flight by Belarusian authorities on 23 May, Belarus became the central topic on the first day of the special European Council meeting of 24-25 May 2021. EU leaders strongly condemned the 'unprecedented and unacceptable incident', and were united in imposing further sanctions on Belarus. As regards Russia, the European Council reconfirmed the five principles guiding the EU's policy since 2016 and asked the High Representative and the European Commission to present a 'report with policy options' by June 2021. On EU-UK relations, EU leaders called on the European Commission to continue to monitor closely the implementation of the two agreements concluded with the UK. On foreign affairs, they also discussed the situations in the Middle East and in Mali, as well as the forthcoming EU-US summit. The leaders' primary focus on the second day was the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, with the European Council calling for rapid implementation of the EU Digital Covid Certificate, the revision of the Council Recommendation on travel within the EU by mid-June 2021 and accelerated global access to coronavirus vaccines. Finally, regarding climate policy, despite renewed support for the 2030 and 2050 climate targets, diverging views on national efforts to achieve the objectives set remained apparent.

Toekomstige activiteiten

15-06-2021
Public Hearing on "Various aspects of women in poverty following the COVID impact"
Hoorzitting -
FEMM
15-06-2021
Pilot Projects and Preparatory Actions: Some Examples of Success
Workshop -
BUDG
15-06-2021
Diverse, local, indigenous: Pathways for food security and conservation
Diverse activiteiten -
DEVE

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