1287

Resulta(a)t(en)

Woord(en)
Publicatietype
Auteur
Zoekterm
Datum

Revision of the EU Blue Card Directive

15-07-2021

Attracting highly qualified immigrants to Europe has been one of the EU's key priorities for several years. However, up until now the EU has not been as successful as other OECD countries. This demand for workers is expected to increase due to the increasing shortage of certain skills and the aging of the EU's population. The proposed directive, which would replace the 2009 Blue Card Directive, increases the attractiveness of the EU highly skilled migration scheme by expanding its scope, lowering ...

Attracting highly qualified immigrants to Europe has been one of the EU's key priorities for several years. However, up until now the EU has not been as successful as other OECD countries. This demand for workers is expected to increase due to the increasing shortage of certain skills and the aging of the EU's population. The proposed directive, which would replace the 2009 Blue Card Directive, increases the attractiveness of the EU highly skilled migration scheme by expanding its scope, lowering criteria for admission or expanding the rights of beneficiaries. On 15 June 2017, the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) adopted its report, and voted to open interinstitutional negotiations. After the Council agreed its mandate, trilogue meetings started in September 2017, but little progress was made before the end of the 2014-2019 parliamentary term. In October 2019, Parliament decided to resume work on the file in the context of ‘unfinished business’ to be carried over to the new legislature. The European Commission’s ‘New Pact on Migration and Asylum’, presented on 23 September 2020, stressed the need to finalise the negotiations. On 17 May 2021, the Parliament and the Portuguese Presidency of the EU Council finally reached an interim agreement on the revision of the directive. On 21 May, Member States’ ambassadors, in the Committee of Permanent Representatives, endorsed the agreement. And on 3 June, the LIBE committee also endorsed the agreement reached with the Council. Parliament is expected to vote on adopting the agreed text during the September 2021 plenary session. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by Martina Prpic. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Addressing the dissemination of terrorist content online

15-07-2021

Dissemination of terrorist content is one of the most widespread and most dangerous forms of misuse of online services in the field of internal security. In line with the 2015 European agenda on security, and taking into account the impact of this propaganda on the radicalisation, recruitment and training of terrorists, the European Commission launched a voluntary system for tackling terrorism online, based on guidelines and recommendations. However, given the limitations of self-regulation, in September ...

Dissemination of terrorist content is one of the most widespread and most dangerous forms of misuse of online services in the field of internal security. In line with the 2015 European agenda on security, and taking into account the impact of this propaganda on the radicalisation, recruitment and training of terrorists, the European Commission launched a voluntary system for tackling terrorism online, based on guidelines and recommendations. However, given the limitations of self-regulation, in September 2018 the Commission proposed a regulation on preventing the dissemination of terrorist content online through the removal of such content within one hour of being posted. While the Council rapidly reached a position on the proposal, the European Parliament adopted its first-reading position in April 2019. Following the European elections, and the appointment of a new rapporteur, interinstitutional trilogue negotiations on the proposal began in autumn 2019. The trilogue meetings were delayed several times, because of the coronavirus pandemic among other reasons. After a new series of terrorist attacks hit Europe in autumn 2020, Parliament and Council reached political agreement on 10 December 2020. The most contentious issues related to the cross-border effect of withdrawal orders and to the use of automated filters to detect terrorist content online. After the Council adopted the text on 16 March 2021, Parliament adopted it in plenary on 28 April. The Regulation entered into force on 6 June and will apply as of 7 June 2022. Third edition of a briefing originally drafted by François Théron. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Internet access as a fundamental right: Exploring aspects of connectivity

15-07-2021

With digital technologies permeating all areas of life, and online access becoming a prerequisite for the exercise of a number of fundamental rights, the internet plays a crucial role for the individual, during but also looking beyond the coronavirus pandemic. As calls for a fundamental right to internet access resurface, it would come as no surprise if legislators engaged further with the topic and assessed policy and legislative options. Against this backdrop, the present analysis i) identifies ...

With digital technologies permeating all areas of life, and online access becoming a prerequisite for the exercise of a number of fundamental rights, the internet plays a crucial role for the individual, during but also looking beyond the coronavirus pandemic. As calls for a fundamental right to internet access resurface, it would come as no surprise if legislators engaged further with the topic and assessed policy and legislative options. Against this backdrop, the present analysis i) identifies design and operating parameters for a potential fundamental right to internet access, ii) sets out a design option, iii) reviews benefits and drawbacks of its potential recognition and iv) provides a brief overview of EU legislation and actions that may interact with such a novel right.

At a glance note for Research for PECH committee: Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on EU fisheries and aquaculture

14-07-2021

This study analyses the effects of COVID-19 on the EU fisheries and aquaculture sectors from March to December 2020. It gives an overview of the main effects experienced at EU level and develops eight case studies (Spain, Denmark, France, Italy, Sweden, Greece, Portugal and Bulgaria). The research also provides conclusions and policy recommendations to strengthen the sector’s resilience to shocks, and to address current vulnerabilities in view of potential similar events. The study was commissioned ...

This study analyses the effects of COVID-19 on the EU fisheries and aquaculture sectors from March to December 2020. It gives an overview of the main effects experienced at EU level and develops eight case studies (Spain, Denmark, France, Italy, Sweden, Greece, Portugal and Bulgaria). The research also provides conclusions and policy recommendations to strengthen the sector’s resilience to shocks, and to address current vulnerabilities in view of potential similar events. The study was commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Structural and Cohesion Policies, at the request of the PECH Committee.

Externe auteur

Cogea: Alessandro PITITTO, Diletta RAINONE, Valentina SANNINO AND International: Tanguy CHEVER, Lucas HERRY, Sibylle PARANT, Safa SOUIDI CETMAR: Marta BALLESTEROS, Rosa CHAPELA, José L. SANTIAGO

Re-starting tourism in the EU amid the pandemic

13-07-2021

Tourism plays an enormously important role in the EU economy and society. It generates foreign exchange, supports jobs and businesses, and drives forward local development and cultural exchanges. It also makes places more attractive, not only as destinations to visit but also as locations to live, work, invest and study. Furthermore, as tourism is closely linked with many other sectors – particularly transport – it also affects the wider economy. The coronavirus pandemic has hit the tourism sector ...

Tourism plays an enormously important role in the EU economy and society. It generates foreign exchange, supports jobs and businesses, and drives forward local development and cultural exchanges. It also makes places more attractive, not only as destinations to visit but also as locations to live, work, invest and study. Furthermore, as tourism is closely linked with many other sectors – particularly transport – it also affects the wider economy. The coronavirus pandemic has hit the tourism sector hard. The impact on various tourist destinations in the EU has been asymmetrical and highly localised, reflecting differences in types of tourism on offer, varying travel restrictions, the size of domestic tourism markets, level of exposure to international tourism, and the importance of tourism in the local economy. At the beginning of summer 2021, several EU Member States started to remove certain travel restrictions (such as the requirements for quarantine or testing for fully vaccinated travellers coming from certain countries). However, all continue to apply many sanitary and health measures (such as limits on the number of people in common areas, and cleaning and disinfection of spaces). Such measures and restrictions change in line with the evolving public health situation, sometimes at short notice, making recovery difficult for the sector. The EU and its Member States have provided the tourism sector with financial and other support. Some measures were already adopted in 2020. Others were endorsed only shortly before the beginning of summer 2021. One flagship action has been the speedy adoption of an EU Digital Covid Certificate. This certificate harmonises, at EU level, proof of vaccination, Covid-19 test results and certified recovery from the virus. However, it does not end the patchwork of travel rules. Despite efforts to harmonise travel rules at Council level, Member States still apply different rules to various categories of traveller (such as children or travellers arriving from third countries).

Towards a common EU approach to lifting coronavirus-related restrictions on freedom of movement

13-07-2021

To reduce the spread of the coronavirus, Member States have taken a wide range of measures, which have significantly affected the free movement of people in the EU. Restrictions on freedom of movement have varied in time and across countries – following generally but not strictly – successive 'waves' of coronavirus infections. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the EU and the Member States have been active in developing a coordinated response to the pandemic, starting from emergency measures to ...

To reduce the spread of the coronavirus, Member States have taken a wide range of measures, which have significantly affected the free movement of people in the EU. Restrictions on freedom of movement have varied in time and across countries – following generally but not strictly – successive 'waves' of coronavirus infections. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the EU and the Member States have been active in developing a coordinated response to the pandemic, starting from emergency measures to mitigate the effects of the sudden introduction of border controls in the early days of the pandemic to establishing common approaches on risk indicators, interoperable contact tracing apps, vaccination and digital certification. This briefing provides an overview of the main restrictions on free movement adopted by the EU and Schengen countries focusing on control measures at the internal borders introduced between March 2020 and July 2021. It then discusses the key steps taken by the EU and the Member States to develop a common approach to lifting restrictions on freedom of movement. The briefing also places the coronavirus-related restrictions of movement in the context of broader efforts to update and strengthen the Schengen system, which has been under stress for at least a decade. This is an updated edition of an EPRS briefing published in November 2020.

Exchanges of Personal Data After the Schrems II Judgment

08-07-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines reforms to the legal framework for the exchange of personal and other data between the EU and the USA that would be necessary to ascertain that the requirements of EU law are satisfied and that the rights of EU citizens are respected, following the Schrems II judgment of the EU Court of Justice.

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines reforms to the legal framework for the exchange of personal and other data between the EU and the USA that would be necessary to ascertain that the requirements of EU law are satisfied and that the rights of EU citizens are respected, following the Schrems II judgment of the EU Court of Justice.

Externe auteur

Ian BROWN, Visiting CyberBRICS professor at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) Law School in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Douwe KORFF, Emeritus Professor of International Law, London Metropolitan University, UK

Artificial intelligence at EU borders: Overview of applications and key issues

07-07-2021

The EU is actively exploring how AI technologies can be developed and adopted in order to improve border control and security. A number of applications for biometric identification, emotion detection, risk assessment and migration monitoring have already been deployed or tested at EU borders. AI technologies may bring important benefits for border control and security, such as increased efficiency, better fraud-detection and risk analysis. However, these powerful technologies also pose significant ...

The EU is actively exploring how AI technologies can be developed and adopted in order to improve border control and security. A number of applications for biometric identification, emotion detection, risk assessment and migration monitoring have already been deployed or tested at EU borders. AI technologies may bring important benefits for border control and security, such as increased efficiency, better fraud-detection and risk analysis. However, these powerful technologies also pose significant challenges, related in particular to their insufficient or varying accuracy and the multiple fundamental rights risks they entail (including bias and discrimination risks, data protection and privacy risks, and the risk of unlawful profiling).

The fight against disinformation and the right to freedom of expression

05-07-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, aims at finding the balance between regulatory measures to tackle disinformation and the protection of freedom of expression. It explores the European legal framework and analyses the roles of all stakeholders in the information landscape. The study offers recommendations to reform the attention-based, data-driven information landscape and regulate ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, aims at finding the balance between regulatory measures to tackle disinformation and the protection of freedom of expression. It explores the European legal framework and analyses the roles of all stakeholders in the information landscape. The study offers recommendations to reform the attention-based, data-driven information landscape and regulate platforms’ rights and duties relating to content moderation.

Externe auteur

Dr. Judit BAYER Dr. Irini KATSIREA Dr. Olga BATURA Prof. Dr. Bernd HOLZNAGEL Dr. Sarah HARTMANN Katarzyna LUBIANIEC

Disinformation campaigns about LGBTI+ people in the EU and foreign influence

02-07-2021

The purpose of this briefing is to give a concise overview of disinformation, misinformation and propaganda campaigns about LGBTI+ persons and rights, originating from or being supported and/or multiplied by actors outside the EU. Based on a review of existing literature, the briefing examines the main narratives used, supported and circulated, as well as which actors or group of actors are involved. Where available, information on methods, funding and impacts on European values is provided. The ...

The purpose of this briefing is to give a concise overview of disinformation, misinformation and propaganda campaigns about LGBTI+ persons and rights, originating from or being supported and/or multiplied by actors outside the EU. Based on a review of existing literature, the briefing examines the main narratives used, supported and circulated, as well as which actors or group of actors are involved. Where available, information on methods, funding and impacts on European values is provided. The main narratives identified include negative othering, opposing a ‘gender ideology’, ‘heteroactivism’, restoring a ‘natural’ order, ‘colonialism’ and child safety. The briefing concludes that there is a need for more research, further harmonisation of legal frameworks, the scrutiny of financial flows and strengthened capacity to detect disinformation, misinformation, propaganda and hate speech.

Externe auteur

Cecilia STRAND, Jakob SVENSSON, Roland BLOMEYER, Margarita SANZ

Toekomstige activiteiten

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Diverse activiteiten -
EPRS

Partners