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Revision of the TEN-E Regulation: EU guidelines for new energy infrastructure

18-11-2021

On 15 December 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2013 regulation on trans-European networks in energy (TEN-E). This proposal is currently the subject of interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations, which started after both the European Parliament (October 2021) and the Council of the EU (June 2021) had adopted formal negotiating positions. The 2013 TEN-E Regulation sets out EU guidelines for cross-border energy infrastructure, and outlines the process for selecting projects ...

On 15 December 2020, the European Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2013 regulation on trans-European networks in energy (TEN-E). This proposal is currently the subject of interinstitutional 'trilogue' negotiations, which started after both the European Parliament (October 2021) and the Council of the EU (June 2021) had adopted formal negotiating positions. The 2013 TEN-E Regulation sets out EU guidelines for cross-border energy infrastructure, and outlines the process for selecting projects of common interest (PCI). PCIs are infrastructure projects considered essential for delivering on EU objectives in the energy field, including improved interconnection between national markets, greater competitiveness, security of supply, and promotion of renewable energy sources. The list of PCIs is updated every two years. Certain PCI projects are eligible for EU financing from the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF). The revised TEN-E Regulation would align closely with the climate neutrality objectives of the European Green Deal: supporting energy infrastructure that consolidates new and existing clean energy technologies, and ending policy and financial support for fossil fuel projects. The latter would no longer be included on PCI lists and therefore unable to receive CEF funding.

Climate action in the Netherlands: Latest state of play

30-08-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Dutch economy decreased by 29 % between 2005 and 2019, a slower rate than the EU-wide average. Energy industry emissions fell by 15 % in the 2005-2019 period in the country. Measures such as the introduction of carbon pricing, are expected to further decrease these emissions. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 55 % – was waste management. Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020) and Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030), the Netherlands needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 16 % and 36 % respectively, compared with 2005 levels. The share of renewable energy sources in the country reached 8.8 % in 2019, and for 2030 the target is 27 %, to be reached mainly through solar power and offshore and onshore wind farms.

Climate action in Finland: Latest state of play

30-08-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Finland's final NECP is from December 2019. A high proportion of Finns (61 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Finland generates 1.5 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Finland's final NECP is from December 2019. A high proportion of Finns (61 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Finland generates 1.5 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is lower than the EU average, and following a similar downward trend. The energy industry and transport are the main emitting sectors in Finland, together accounting for 50 % of total emissions in 2019. With a coal phase-out commitment, and new nuclear facilities starting operations this decade, energy industry emissions will drop. Finland has identified additional measures to reduce transport sector emissions. Biomass will be used for biofuels in transport as well as heat and electricity generation. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Finland was required to reduce non-ETS emissions by 16 % by 2020, compared with 2005, while for the year 2030 the reduction must reach 39 %. Finland achieved a 43.1 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 51 % share is focused mainly on wind and biomass. Energy efficiency measures centre on building stock renovation and voluntary energy efficiency agreements across industry and households.

Climate action in Lithuania: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Lithuania finalised its NECP in December 2019. Lithuania generates 0.55 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Lithuania finalised its NECP in December 2019. Lithuania generates 0.55 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. Most economic sectors showed emissions reductions in the 2005-2019 period, with the exception of transport, agriculture and the 'other emissions' sectors. The transport and agriculture sectors account for 52 % of Lithuania's total emissions. Energy industry emissions have fallen by 60 % since 2005, while emissions in the 'other emissions' category, which includes services and buildings grew by 24 %. EU effort-sharing legislation allowed Lithuania to increase its emissions by 15 % up until 2020. Lithuania stayed well below its 2013-2020 allowances and expects to over-achieve on the 2030 target of 9 % reductions relative to 2005, potentially achieving 21 % reductions. Lithuania's renewable energy share was 25.5 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 45 % share focuses mainly on wind, solar and biofuels. Energy efficiency measures centre to a large extent on the building stock and transport sector with support schemes for industry and households.

Climate action in Estonia: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Estonia submitted its NECP in December 2019. Estonia recovered its independence in 1991 and joined the European Union in 2004. In the 1990s, the country launched structural reforms related to its transition to a market-based economy. In 2019, its total GHG emissions ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Estonia submitted its NECP in December 2019. Estonia recovered its independence in 1991 and joined the European Union in 2004. In the 1990s, the country launched structural reforms related to its transition to a market-based economy. In 2019, its total GHG emissions amounted to 15.2 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent (MtCO2e), excluding land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) and including international aviation, generating 0.4 % of the EU-27's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. By 2030, Estonia aims to achieve a GHG emissions reduction of 70 % compared with 1990. Its long-term target is a reduction of 80 % by 2050. The new government has set an even more ambitious target, aiming for climate neutrality by 2050. It also envisages a motivation package to help local governments reach carbon neutrality by 2030. However, Estonia's total emissions per inhabitant remained above the EU average in 2019, and the carbon intensity of its economy was one of the highest in the Union. The country's energy independence and security of supply still rely on oil shale, although between 2005 and 2019, the share of renewables in Estonia grew faster than the EU average, over-reaching the 2020 target.

Climate action in Greece: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from 2005 to 2019, at a slower rate than the EU-27 average. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 45 % in the 2005-2019 period in Greece, reducing their share of total emissions by 14 %. Further reductions are expected as the country proceeds with phasing out lignite-fired power plants. The sector that showed the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 54 % – was manufacturing industries and construction. Transport and agriculture were the sectors with the lowest reductions. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Greece needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emission trading system by 4 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieving it. The share of renewable energy sources in Greece reached 19.7 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 35 % share is focused mainly on changes to the transport and heating and cooling sectors. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in France: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. France submitted its final NECP in April 2020. In 2019, France accounted for 459 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent (MtCO2e) in total emissions excluding land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) and including international aviation, generating 12 % of the EU- ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. France submitted its final NECP in April 2020. In 2019, France accounted for 459 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent (MtCO2e) in total emissions excluding land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) and including international aviation, generating 12 % of the EU-27 total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Since 2005, the country has reduced its emissions at the same pace as the EU average. Over the 2005-2019 period, French emissions per inhabitant decreased faster than the EU average. The carbon intensity of the economy fell by 32 % and remained among the lowest in the EU while GDP increased by 17 %. In 2019, the transport, residential, tertiary and agriculture sectors accounted for around 60 % of France's total emissions. In order to reduce its energy dependency, France still maintains a high share of nuclear energy in its national energy mix. However, between 2005 and 2019, the share of energy from renewable sources rose steadily, reaching 17 % in 2019; this is still 16 percentage points (pp) below the 2030 national target of 33 % however. Energy efficiency, along with renewables, is a corner-stone of the French decarbonisation strategy, targeting in particular the buildings and transport sectors.

Climate action in Germany: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. A high proportion of Germans (63 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. A high proportion of Germans (63 %) expect national governments to tackle climate change. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling, also mirroring the EU pattern. Energy industries are the largest source of emissions, responsible for 29 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, by 2020 Germany was required to reduce its emissions by 14 % compared with 2005. However, the country exceeded its allocated emissions from 2016 to 2019. Germany's current 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (ESR) is to reduce emissions by 38 % from 2005 levels. According to the Commission's assessment of Germany's NECP, with the new proposed measures the reduction will fall short of the target by 3 percentage points. In 2019, renewable energy sources accounted for 17.4 % of gross final consumption, just 0.6 percentage points short of the target set for 2020. Following a court ruling on 24 March 2021, which found that the Climate Change Act was not aligned with fundamental rights, the German government announced its intention to strengthen its commitment, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2045.

Climate action in Croatia: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Croatia's final NECP is from December 2019. Croatia generates 0.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The country's emissions intensity is significantly higher than the EU average, though it is on a steady downward trend. The transport sector accounted for over a quarter of Croatia's total emissions in 2019. The Croatian building stock is also responsible for a significant share of total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 40 % between 2005 and 2019, reducing the sector's share of total emissions by six percentage points. The Croatian economy is heavily reliant on energy imports. Diversifying supply and reducing demand is seen as key to the transition process. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Croatia was allowed to increase emissions until 2020 but must reduce these emissions by 7 % relative to 2005 by 2030. Croatia achieved a 28.5 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 36.4 % share is focused mainly on photovoltaics, wind and biofuels. Measures to boost energy efficiency centre on building stock renovation and energy efficiency obligation schemes for energy suppliers. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Italy: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Italy's final NECP was sent in December 2019. Italy generates 11.4 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a faster pace than the EU average since 2005. Emissions decreased across all economic sectors in Italy over the 2005-2019 period, with the agricultural sector showing the lowest reductions. The transport and 'other emissions' sectors, including buildings, account for almost half of Italy's total emissions. Energy industry emissions fell by 42 % between 2005 and 2019, leaving the sector in third place in terms of its share of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Italy reduced its emissions by 13 % by 2020 relative to 2005, and the country expects to reach the 2030 target of 33 %. Italy achieved an 18 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 30 % share is focused mainly on wind and solar power. Energy efficiency measures centre to a large extent on the building stock and transport sectors with support schemes for industry and households. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Planowane wydarzenia

29-11-2021
The Mutual Defence Clause (Article 42(7) TEU) in the face of new threats
Przesłuchanie -
SEDE
29-11-2021
Competitiveness of EU agriculture
Przesłuchanie -
AGRI
30-11-2021
Eliminating Violence against Women - Inter-parliamentary committee meeting
Inne wydarzenie -
FEMM

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