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Rail passengers' rights and obligations in the EU

12-07-2021

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September ...

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September 2017, the European Commission presented a new proposal to address these issues and to strike a new balance between keeping rail operators competitive and providing adequate passenger protection. The European Parliament adopted its first-reading position on this proposal on 15 November 2018. For its part, the Council adopted its general approach on 2 December 2019, under the Finnish Presidency. Interinstitutional negotiations began at the end of January 2020, and on 1 October 2020, under the Germany Presidency, Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the text. On 29 April 2021, the European Parliament voted in favour of the agreed text as adopted by the Council. The new rules were published in the Official Journal of the EU on 17 May 2021. They will apply in principle to all international and domestic rail journeys and services in the EU from 7 June 2023. However, Member States may exempt domestic rail services for a limited time. Seventh edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Single European Sky 2+ package: Amended Commission proposal

12-07-2021

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment ...

The Single European Sky (SES) initiative aims to make EU airspace less fragmented and to improve air traffic management in terms of safety, capacity, cost-efficiency and the environment. Its current regulatory framework is based on two legislative packages: SES I (adopted in 2004), which set the principal legal framework, and SES II (adopted in 2009), which aimed to tackle substantial air traffic growth, increase safety, and reduce costs and delays and the impact of air traffic on the environment. Nonetheless, European airspace remains fragmented, costly and inefficient. The European Commission presented a revision of the SES in 2013 (the SES 2+ package). While the Parliament adopted its first-reading position in March 2014, in December 2014 the Council agreed only a partial general approach, owing to disagreement between the UK and Spain over the application of the text to Gibraltar airport. With Brexit having removed this blockage, the Commission has amended its initial proposal. The Council and the Parliament have both adopted their positions on the revised proposal, and can thus start trilogue negotiations. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

At a glance - Research for TRAN Committee - Transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas

05-02-2021

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

The study investigates key challenges and trends concerning transport infrastructure in low-density and depopulating areas . It also provides a comprehensive assessment of relevant transport policies and projects already implemented as well as policy recommendations aimed at overcoming those identified challenges and gaps.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

VVA: Luca BISASCHI, Liviu CALOFIR , Jessica CARNEIRO, Davide CECCANTI, Francesco ROMANO, and Malin CARLBERG TEPR: Ian SKINNER

Research for TRAN Committee-Sustainable and smart urban transport

26-01-2021

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Recent trends and developments indicate a growing user-centric approach to mobility, prioritising individual needs and users’ interests. Disruptive emerging technologies and shared mobility solutions bring new stakeholders to the urban ecosystem. COVID-19 has changed behaviours, with walking, cycling and private car use increasing. E-commerce demand has increased significantly, and contactless solutions are still preferred.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Giacomo Lozzi, Edoardo Marcucci, Valerio Gatta Panteia B.V: Maria Rodrigues, Tharsis Teoh, Carolina Ramos, Eline Jonkers

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy

20-01-2021

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion ...

Transport is the backbone of the EU economy, connecting people and businesses across various EU regions and countries. The coronavirus pandemic has shown the impact of mobility restrictions on the free movement of people, goods and services and, at the same time, confirmed the essential role of transport in safeguarding the functioning of vital supply chains. However, transport also generates significant costs to society, in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, environmental pollution, accidents, congestion and loss of biodiversity. EU ambitions to address these negative impacts have increased over the years. In December 2019, the European Commission put forward the European Green Deal that aims to make the EU carbon neutral by 2050. This goal was subsequently endorsed by the European Parliament and EU Member States. To achieve climate neutrality, the EU transport sector has to cut its CO2 emissions by 90 %. This requirement is in stark contrast with the past trend: despite previously adopted measures, transport is the only sector in which greenhouse gas emissions have kept growing. The Commission has therefore proposed a strategy outlining how it wants to transform the EU transport sector and align it with the European Green Deal, by making it green, digital and resilient. While transport stakeholders have welcomed parts of the strategy as steps in the right direction, concerns about the text’s high ambitions and lack of concrete elements have been voiced. The Commission is to start proposing the measures envisaged in 2021. It remains to be seen to what extent, with what modifications and how fast they will be adopted and then implemented by EU Member States, shaping transport transformation for the years to come.

RESEARCH FOR TRAN COMMITTEE: Sustainable and smart urban transport

16-12-2020

This study aims to provide the European Parliament’s TRAN Committee with an overview on the state of play of sustainable and smart transport, including recent developments/trends, challenges and opportunities, solutions/good practices and recommendations for EU policy makers. It also considers some recent developments related to the impact of COVID-19.

This study aims to provide the European Parliament’s TRAN Committee with an overview on the state of play of sustainable and smart transport, including recent developments/trends, challenges and opportunities, solutions/good practices and recommendations for EU policy makers. It also considers some recent developments related to the impact of COVID-19.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Giacomo Lozzi, Edoardo Marcucci, Valerio Gatta, Maria Rodrigues, Tharsis Teoh, Carolina Ramos, Eline Jonkers

Airport charges: Revision of Directive 2009/12/EC

18-11-2020

The Airports Charges Directive 2009/12/EC is the main legislative act regulating the essential features of airport charges. Airport charges are the charges that the airlines pay to the airports for using their infrastructure and facilities. The two main issues that the directive aims to tackle are the risk that some airports might set prices and terms that are not in line with a competitive market, and the diverging and non-transparent charging systems in the Member States. If the evaluation of the ...

The Airports Charges Directive 2009/12/EC is the main legislative act regulating the essential features of airport charges. Airport charges are the charges that the airlines pay to the airports for using their infrastructure and facilities. The two main issues that the directive aims to tackle are the risk that some airports might set prices and terms that are not in line with a competitive market, and the diverging and non-transparent charging systems in the Member States. If the evaluation of the directive revealed positive effects of the regulation, it also identified problematic issues, which hampers the full achievement of its objectives. The European Commission is expected to submit a new proposal by the end of the year.

Research for TRAN Committee-The impact of emerging technologies on the transport system

10-11-2020

This study provides an overview of the impact of Smart Mobility and their underlying emerging technologies on transport, the transport infrastructure and society. The main challenges for the deployment of Smart Mobility applications are identified and (policy) actions are defined that could be taken to overcome these challenges.

This study provides an overview of the impact of Smart Mobility and their underlying emerging technologies on transport, the transport infrastructure and society. The main challenges for the deployment of Smart Mobility applications are identified and (policy) actions are defined that could be taken to overcome these challenges.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

CE Delft: Arno SCHROTEN, Anouk van GRINSVEN, Eric TOL, Louis LEESTEMAKER TNO: Peter-Paul SCHACKMANN, Diana VONK-NOORDEGRAAF, Jaco van MEIJEREN, Sytze KALISVAART

Research for TRAN Committee - COVID-19 and urban mobility: impacts and perspectives

15-09-2020

The briefing provides an overview on the state of play and trends of urban transport since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. It outlines four scenarios, the prevalence of one or the other depending on the priorities established by policy makers and service providers. The briefing delivers general recommendations for a post-COVID-19 smart and sustainable urban transport and a set of desirable actions on how to integrate EU response into existing policy priorities.

The briefing provides an overview on the state of play and trends of urban transport since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. It outlines four scenarios, the prevalence of one or the other depending on the priorities established by policy makers and service providers. The briefing delivers general recommendations for a post-COVID-19 smart and sustainable urban transport and a set of desirable actions on how to integrate EU response into existing policy priorities.

Autorzy zewnętrzni

Università degli Studi Roma Tre: Giacomo Lozzi, Edoardo Marcucci, Valerio Gatta, Valerio Pacelli Panteia B.V: Maria Rodrigues, Tharsis Teoh

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Transport policy

14-02-2020

Transport is a strategic sector of the EU economy. Essential to ensuring free movement, it enables people and goods to overcome distances, borders and natural barriers, directly affecting the everyday lives of all EU citizens. Maintaining the flow of goods from producers and manufacturers to consumers makes efficient transport systems a backbone of European integration. For the single market to function well in all regions, the EU needs sustainable, efficient and fully interconnected transport networks ...

Transport is a strategic sector of the EU economy. Essential to ensuring free movement, it enables people and goods to overcome distances, borders and natural barriers, directly affecting the everyday lives of all EU citizens. Maintaining the flow of goods from producers and manufacturers to consumers makes efficient transport systems a backbone of European integration. For the single market to function well in all regions, the EU needs sustainable, efficient and fully interconnected transport networks. As the demand for transport services grows, reducing transport emissions and negative impacts on human health and the environment has become one of the main challenges. New technologies, such as digitalisation, and connected and automated mobility, open new possibilities to improve transport safety, security and efficiency, and to reduce emissions, but also transform the employment in the sector in terms of working conditions and required skills. Collaborative economy developments, such as car-sharing and bike-sharing services are changing user behaviour and mobility patterns. EU transport policy needs to help the sector cut emissions drastically by running on less and cleaner energy, utilise modern infrastructure, and reduce its impact on the environment. The new President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, has put transport on a fast track towards becoming decarbonised and digital. This transformation is to be a key part of her European Green Deal and 'making Europe fit for the digital age' priorities. In 2020, the Commission will propose a 'climate law', committing the EU to becoming climate neutral by 2050. The European Council has endorsed this objective and Parliament had already called for ambitious goals and a corresponding long-term EU budget. While concrete steps towards this ambitious goal remain to be defined, it will require a step change to make transport modern, sustainable and decarbonised.

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