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Mode 5 refers to services which are incorporated into goods which are then traded across international borders. Unlike traditional services, Mode 5 services are not subject to the existing international trade regime under the WTO General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). Rather, they are subject to trade rules under the framework that governs trade in goods. As a consequence, trade in Mode 5 services is not fully liberalised, even though liberalisation would be in the best interest of international ...

The Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA), currently under negotiation in Geneva, is a plurilateral agreement involving 50 members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The aim is to liberalise trade in services among those countries, but the EU and others hope to make it part of the WTO rulebook at a later stage. The European Union is the world's largest importer and exporter of services and therefore has a vital interest in both supporting and building a sound regulatory basis for international trade ...

A comparison of the services offers which the European Union has made for the negotiations on the EU-US Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) shows that, in general, both treaties follow similar approaches and points of difference are minor; both TiSA and TTIP apply a positive listing approach in regards to market access and negative listing in regards to national treatment, and the rules governing market access and national treatment do ...

Launched at the beginning of 2013 by a group of World Trade Organisation (WTO) members calling themselves Really Good Friends of Services, negotiations on the plurilateral Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) are nearing an important juncture. The TISA agreement is the biggest free trade agreement currently under discussion when measured by the number of negotiating parties – 23 at present. It is designed to boost liberalisation of the global services sector, moving beyond the current, outdated GATS ...

Fifty-one members of the World Trade Organization (WTO): Australia, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Liechtenstein, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey and the United States, together with the European Union and its 28 Member States – have been trying to find a way to break the deadlock in the Doha Round on liberalising trade in services since March 2013. These countries together represent ...

This Policy Department A study for ECON covers rules on trade in financial services in preferential trade agreements (PTA), in view of current TTIP negotiations. The financial services sector is of strategic importance in trade policy. The EU has already obtained considerable PTA concessions, incl. new investor protection rights. Its PTAs also contain more developed disciplines on financial regulation, incl. prior comment obligations, data processing rules, prudential regulation and use of international ...

Businesses across the world are increasingly interdependent, in so-called "global value chains". As the largest exporter of services in the world the EU has a strong interest in the liberalisation of services. In the light of stagnation in the Doha Round of trade talks, a separate international agreement on trade in services is seen as a way to increase efficiencies in production carried out around the globe. Some 20 countries, led by the United States, the EU and Japan, have recently begun negotiating ...

With the aim of overcoming stalemate in the Doha Round, a number of WTO members, including the EU and the US, are about to launch negotiations on a plurilateral Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA).

Faced with an impasse in World Trade Organisation's global multilateral trade talks, some 20 countries — accounting for two-thirds of the world's cross-border trade in services — began negotiating a plurilateral agreement on services in 2012 with the aim of opening domestic markets to foreign services and guaranteeing foreign and domestic companies equal treatment. Negotiations were confidential until recently, but on 15 January the US Trade Representative's office notified the US Congress of its ...