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Climate action in Latvia: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Latvia submitted its NECP in November 2019. More than half (56 %) of Latvians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Latvia accounts for 0.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and its emissions increased between 2005 and 2019, in contrast ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Latvia submitted its NECP in November 2019. More than half (56 %) of Latvians expect national governments to tackle climate change. Latvia accounts for 0.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and its emissions increased between 2005 and 2019, in contrast to the average EU trend. The carbon intensity of Latvia's economy is higher than the EU average, but has declined since 2005. Emissions from the transport sector increased by 6.9 % between 2005 and 2019, accounting for 27.8 % of total emissions. The manufacturing industries and construction sector showed the biggest percentage reduction (42 %) in emissions over the period. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Latvia was allowed to increase its emissions by 17 % by 2020, compared with 2005, and in 2019 was on track to achieving the target. Latvia achieved a 41 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019 and aims to reach 50 % by 2030. The European Commission regards this ambition as adequate, but warns of possible hurdles.

Climate action in Cyprus: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Cyprus submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Cypriots (70 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. Cyprus accounts for 0.26 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the 2021 to 2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Cyprus submitted its NECP in January 2020. A high proportion of Cypriots (70 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. Cyprus accounts for 0.26 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Cypriot economy decreased by close to 25 % between 2005 and 2019, at a rate slower than the EU average. Energy industry emissions fell by 3.7 % in the 2005 to 2019 period in Cyprus. Further emissions reductions are expected as the country shifts its electricity production from heavy fuel oil to natural gas by the end of 2021. Transport and industrial processes and product use were the sectors with the smallest reductions. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Cyprus needed to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emission trading system by 5 %, compared with 2005 levels. For the Effort-sharing Regulation period (2021-2030) the target is set at -21 % compared with 2005 levels. The share of renewable energy in Cyprus reached 13.8 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 22.9 % share is focused on changes in the heating and cooling, and electricity sectors.

Climate action in Portugal: Latest state of play

03-09-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Portugal submitted its NECP in December 2019. More than half (57%) of Portuguese people expect national governments to tackle climate change. Portugal generates 1.8 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2019, the carbon intensity of Portugal's ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Portugal submitted its NECP in December 2019. More than half (57%) of Portuguese people expect national governments to tackle climate change. Portugal generates 1.8 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In 2019, the carbon intensity of Portugal's economy was 22 % above the EU average, and fell at a slightly slower pace than the EU average over the 2005-2019 period. The transport sector reduced its emissions by 10.3 % between 2005 and 2019 and is the sector with the highest emissions, accounting for 26 % of Portuguese emissions in 2019. Energy sector emissions, accounting for 19 % of total emissions in 2019, fell by 50 % between 2005 and 2019 – the largest reduction in emissions of all sectors. Under EU effort-sharing legislation for the 2013-2020 period, Portugal was allowed to increase its non-ETS GHG emissions by 1 %, compared with 2005, and never surpassed its allocated emissions The share of renewable energy sources in 2019 was 30.6 %. The country's 2030 target of a 47 % share is one of the highest in the EU, with a renewable energy in electricity target of 80 % by 2030.

Climate action in the Netherlands: Latest state of play

30-08-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. The Netherlands submitted its NECP in November 2019. A high proportion of Dutch people (73 %) expect national governments to tackle climate. The Netherlands accounts for 5.2 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Dutch economy decreased by 29 % between 2005 and 2019, a slower rate than the EU-wide average. Energy industry emissions fell by 15 % in the 2005-2019 period in the country. Measures such as the introduction of carbon pricing, are expected to further decrease these emissions. The sector with the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 55 % – was waste management. Under the Effort-sharing Decision (2013 2020) and Effort-sharing Regulation (2021-2030), the Netherlands needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU emissions trading system by 16 % and 36 % respectively, compared with 2005 levels. The share of renewable energy sources in the country reached 8.8 % in 2019, and for 2030 the target is 27 %, to be reached mainly through solar power and offshore and onshore wind farms.

Climate action in Greece: Latest state of play

24-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Greece submitted its NECP in December 2019. Greece accounts for 2.4 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced its emissions at a higher pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of the Greek economy decreased by 23 % from 2005 to 2019, at a slower rate than the EU-27 average. Energy industry emissions fell by almost 45 % in the 2005-2019 period in Greece, reducing their share of total emissions by 14 %. Further reductions are expected as the country proceeds with phasing out lignite-fired power plants. The sector that showed the greatest percentage reduction in emissions between 2005 and 2019 – 54 % – was manufacturing industries and construction. Transport and agriculture were the sectors with the lowest reductions. Under the Effort-sharing Decision for the 2013 2020 period, Greece needs to reduce its emissions in sectors not included in the EU's emission trading system by 4 %, compared with 2005 levels, and is on track to achieving it. The share of renewable energy sources in Greece reached 19.7 % in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 35 % share is focused mainly on changes to the transport and heating and cooling sectors. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in Germany: Latest state of play

10-06-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. Germany submitted its NECP in June 2020. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Germany accounts for 24 % of net EU-27 emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Since 2005, emissions have steadily decreased, following the average trend in the Union. The carbon intensity of the German economy is falling, also mirroring the EU pattern. Energy industries are the largest source of emissions, responsible for 29 % of total emissions. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, by 2020 Germany was required to reduce its emissions by 14 % compared with 2005. However, the country exceeded its allocated emissions from 2016 to 2019. Germany's current 2030 target under the Effort-sharing Regulation (ESR) is to reduce emissions by 38 % from 2005 levels. According to the Commission's assessment of Germany's NECP, with the new proposed measures the reduction will fall short of the target by 3 percentage points. In 2019, renewable energy sources accounted for 17.4 % of gross final consumption, just 0.6 percentage points short of the target set for 2020. Following a court ruling on 24 March 2021, which found that the Climate Change Act was not aligned with fundamental rights, the German government announced its intention to strengthen its commitment, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2045. This briefing is one in a series which will cover all EU Member States.

Climate action in Belgium: Latest state of play

29-04-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Belgian climate and energy policy is a combined effort of the Flemish, Walloon and Brussels Capital regions. Belgium accounts for 3.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Belgian climate and energy policy is a combined effort of the Flemish, Walloon and Brussels Capital regions. Belgium accounts for 3.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of Belgium's economy is slightly lower than the EU average and has mirrored the decreasing EU trend closely since 2005. Emissions from energy industries have fell by almost 30 % between 2005 and 2019, with a 2.9 percentage point reduction for total emissions. Waste management was the sector with the biggest percentage reduction (55 % or 1.7 MtCO2e) in emissions since 2005. Transport and agriculture were the sectors with the lowest reduction. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Belgium was aiming to reduce its emissions by 15 % by 2020, compared with 2005, and in 2019 was on track to achieving the target. Belgium reached a 9.9 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. Its ambition to reach its 2030 target of a 17.5 % share focused mainly on wind and photovoltaic energy, biofuels and the use of waste heat. Measures to achieve the energy efficiency targets are focused on the building and transport sectors. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Spain: Latest state of play

29-04-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Spain accounts for 9 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2019, the country reduced emissions by 27 %, performing better than the EU average. The carbon intensity of the Spanish economy is slightly below the EU average. The transport ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Spain accounts for 9 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2019, the country reduced emissions by 27 %, performing better than the EU average. The carbon intensity of the Spanish economy is slightly below the EU average. The transport sector is the largest emitter in the country, generating 27 % of emissions, followed by the energy industry with a share of 16 % of emissions. The energy sector cut emissions by 57 % during the 2005-2019 period, strongly contributing to the country's total emission reduction. Under the EU effort-sharing regulation, Spain has committed to reducing non-ETS emissions by 26 % by 2030 (compared with 2005) and plans to surpass this target. Looking forward to 2030, Spain has considerably increased its level of ambition for the energy transition, moving from a 2020 target of a 20 % share of renewable energy in the energy mix to a 2030 target of 42 %. The country plans to focus primarily on the deployment of solar and wind power. The proposed measures are expected to generate energy efficiency improvements of over 39 %. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

EU climate action policy: Responding to the global emergency

18-03-2021

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate ...

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate policies, it outlines international climate agreements, EU climate action and the climate policies of major economies. It assesses the coherence of EU climate policy with other policy areas, and presents the financing of EU climate action through the EU budget and other instruments. To assess the implications of the climate neutrality objective, the study analysis the challenges and opportunities for the EU economy and its impacts on issues such as international relations, migration, trade, consumers and health . The final chapter addresses the issues facing European decision-makers and the outlook for European and global climate action in the context of the coronavirus pandemic.

Climate action in Denmark: Latest state of play

18-02-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy targets for 2030 require Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Denmark submitted its NECP in December 2019. The country accounts for 1.6 % of the EU's net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2018, it achieved a net emissions reduction of 23 %, performing better than the EU as a whole. In addition, the carbon intensity ...

The EU's binding climate and energy targets for 2030 require Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) for the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Denmark submitted its NECP in December 2019. The country accounts for 1.6 % of the EU's net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2018, it achieved a net emissions reduction of 23 %, performing better than the EU as a whole. In addition, the carbon intensity of the Danish economy was below the EU average, and decreased more rapidly. In 2019, the country's emissions were concentrated in three sectors – transport, energy and agriculture – amounting to 69 % of total emissions. Developments in the energy sector were particularly notable and serve to explain two-thirds of the reduction in total emissions accomplished since 2005. Regarding emissions under the Effort-sharing Regulation, the emissions reduction target for Denmark has risen from 20 % for 2020 to 39 % by 2030 (compared to 2005). After reaching the 30 % share of renewables target well in advance of 2020, a 55 % target has been set for 2030. In 2019, the 2020 targets relating to energy efficiency had still not been met, and the level of ambition in those areas for 2030 has been revised downwards.

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