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Exploring the performance gap in EU Framework Programmes between EU13 and EU15 Member States

17-06-2020

The European Union (EU)'s Research and Innovation Framework Programmes are the largest programmes for international research collaboration worldwide. Repeated reports point to the issue of underperformance in the Framework Programmes by the EU13 Member States - countries that joined the EU in and after 2004 - in comparison with the EU15 Member States - which entered the EU before 2004. This in-depth analysis explores the background of various challenges in research and development of EU13 vs EU15 ...

The European Union (EU)'s Research and Innovation Framework Programmes are the largest programmes for international research collaboration worldwide. Repeated reports point to the issue of underperformance in the Framework Programmes by the EU13 Member States - countries that joined the EU in and after 2004 - in comparison with the EU15 Member States - which entered the EU before 2004. This in-depth analysis explores the background of various challenges in research and development of EU13 vs EU15, in order to investigate the gap between these two groups. A set of hypotheses, divided in five domains, are tested empirically. This includes: research and innovation system structure; scientific level of research institutions and quality of proposals; quantity of submitted proposals; level of international collaboration; and other factors related to the Framework Programmes. The weak positions of most EU13 Member States for several of the indicators analysed, show that the field of research in EU13 Member States requires further structural changes. This report is followed by policy options for mitigating the innovation gap in Europe.

Autor externo

DG, EPRS-This document presents an update of the STOA study 'Overcoming innovation gaps in the EU-13 Member States'. The study was requested by the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit (STOA) within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the European Parliament. Members of the project team were: Michal Pazour, Vladimir Albrecht, Daniel Frank, Vlastimil Ruzicka, Jiri Vanecek, Ondrej Pecha, Zdenek Kucera, Technology Centre CAS, Prague; Edwin Horlings, Barend van der Meulen, Rathenau Institute, The Hague; Leonhard Hennen (ETAG co-ordinator), KIT/ITAS, Karlsruhe. In addition, hypothesis 6 discussed in the present report is obtained from the STOA study ‘Internationalisation of EU research organisations: A bibliometric stocktaking study’, written by Marek Kwiek, Director of the Center for Public Policy Studies, UNESCO Chair in Institutional Research and Higher Education Policy at the University of Poznan, Poland.

The EU strategy for international cooperation in research and innovation

22-10-2019

In 2012, the Commission announced the EU's strategic approach to enhancing EU international cooperation in research and innovation, and in this it underlined the role for the EU that derives from being a global leader in research and innovation. It also pinpointed the Horizon 2020 programme (2014-2020) and science diplomacy as the main tools for implementing the strategy. This Implementation Appraisal presents and evaluates the implementation of the strategy after a number of years in force, examining ...

In 2012, the Commission announced the EU's strategic approach to enhancing EU international cooperation in research and innovation, and in this it underlined the role for the EU that derives from being a global leader in research and innovation. It also pinpointed the Horizon 2020 programme (2014-2020) and science diplomacy as the main tools for implementing the strategy. This Implementation Appraisal presents and evaluates the implementation of the strategy after a number of years in force, examining both successes and shortcomings. It also stresses the need to ensure the efficient use of means in the financial framework for 2021 to 2027.

Internationalisation of EU research organisations

24-07-2019

International research collaboration is the core of contemporary higher education and science systems. The percentage of internationally co-authored publications globally and across Europe has been on the rise. The aim of the study is to analyse the changing nature of academic knowledge production in EU28 Member States towards its increasing internationalization. A number of policy options concerning the improvement of international research collaboration in the European Union are suggested.

International research collaboration is the core of contemporary higher education and science systems. The percentage of internationally co-authored publications globally and across Europe has been on the rise. The aim of the study is to analyse the changing nature of academic knowledge production in EU28 Member States towards its increasing internationalization. A number of policy options concerning the improvement of international research collaboration in the European Union are suggested.

Autor externo

This study has been written by Professor Marek Kwiek, Director of the Center for Public Policy Studies, UNESCO Chair in Institutional Research and Higher Education Policy at the University of Poznan, Poland

Horizon Europe: Framework programme for research and innovation 2021–2027

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the European Innovation Council, missions to promote research results, and new forms of partnerships. Horizon Europe also aims at reducing administrative burdens and promoting the concept of open science. More operational synergies are expected through better linkage with other EU programmes, such as cohesion policy (e.g. the European Social Fund), the new Digital Europe programme, and the new European Defence Fund. In March 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement. This agreement covers the content, but not, among other things, the budgetary issues, which will be discussed following the negotiations on the EU’s 2021-2027 long-term budget. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Horizon Europe – Specific programme: Implementing the framework programme

15-05-2019

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the ...

In June 2018, the European Commission proposed a total budget allocation of €100 billion to finance science, research and innovation projects during the 2021-2027 period, of which the vast majority, €94.1 billion in current prices, would be allocated to the Horizon Europe framework programme. The main aims are to strengthen science and technology, to foster industrial competiveness, and to implement the sustainable development goals in the EU. Horizon Europe would introduce new features such as the European Innovation Council, missions to promote research results, and new forms of partnerships. While the proposal for the framework programme sets out the general and specific objective of Horizon Europe as well as the structure and the broad lines of the activities to be carried out, the specific programme aims to define the operational objectives and activities, especially for missions, the European Research Council, the European Innovation Council, work programmes, and the committee procedure. In April 2019, after several trilogue meetings, Parliament and Council reached a partial agreement, covering the specific programme’s content. It does not however address budgetary issues, pending negotiations on the EU’s overall 2021-2027 long-term budget. Parliament thus adopted its first-reading position on 17 April 2019, and it is expected that further trilogue negotiations will take place in the new term.

Boosting cooperation on health technology assessment

15-04-2019

The European Commission has proposed a regulation on health technology assessment (HTA). HTA is a research-based tool that supports decision-making in healthcare by assessing the added value of a given health technology compared to others. The proposal would provide the basis for permanent EU-level cooperation in four areas. Member States would still be responsible for assessing the non-clinical (economic, ethical, social, etc.) aspects of health technology, and for pricing and reimbursement. While ...

The European Commission has proposed a regulation on health technology assessment (HTA). HTA is a research-based tool that supports decision-making in healthcare by assessing the added value of a given health technology compared to others. The proposal would provide the basis for permanent EU-level cooperation in four areas. Member States would still be responsible for assessing the non-clinical (economic, ethical, social, etc.) aspects of health technology, and for pricing and reimbursement. While Member States could choose to delay participation in the joint work until three years after the rules enter into force, it would become mandatory after six years. Stakeholders have broadly welcomed the proposal. National parliaments, however, are divided in their appreciation of it. The Council has not yet agreed its position; technical discussions continue. Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted its report on 13 September 2018, and the report was voted in plenary on 3 October. However, with interinstitutional trilogue negotiations unable to start, on the Council side, Parliament adopted its final position at first reading on 14 February 2019.

The Horizon Europe framework programme for research and innovation 2021-2027

22-11-2018

Within the context of the multiannual financial framework the Commission is proposing Horizon Europe as the framework programme for research and innovation to succeed Horizon 2020. This initial appraisal of the Commission’s impact assessment on the proposal acknowledges the necessity for impact assessments in relation to financial framework programmes to have a simplified format and scope differing from standard impact assessments and that the document in question sets out the rationale for the new ...

Within the context of the multiannual financial framework the Commission is proposing Horizon Europe as the framework programme for research and innovation to succeed Horizon 2020. This initial appraisal of the Commission’s impact assessment on the proposal acknowledges the necessity for impact assessments in relation to financial framework programmes to have a simplified format and scope differing from standard impact assessments and that the document in question sets out the rationale for the new programme and explains the choices made in its design rather effectively. It however questions the extent of the departure from the standard methodology and format of impact assessments set in the Commission’s better regulation guidelines.

Sector coupling: how can it be enhanced in the EU to foster grid stability and decarbonise?

19-11-2018

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated ...

Sector coupling involves the increased integration of energy end-use and supply sectors with one another. This can improve the efficiency and flexibility of the energy system as well as its reliability and adequacy. Additionally, sector coupling can reduce the costs of decarbonisation. To foster the full potential of sector coupling in several end-use and supply applications, it is important that existing techno-economic, policy and regulatory barriers are removed. Furthermore, a more integrated approach to energy systems planning is needed. This document was provided by Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy.

Autor externo

Luc VAN NUFFEL, João GORENSTEIN DEDECCA, Tycho SMIT, Koen RADEMAEKERS, Trinomics B.V.

European high-performance computing joint undertaking

31-10-2018

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as ...

Following a declaration made by seven EU Member States in March 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to establish a joint undertaking for high-performance computing (HPC) under Article 187 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) on 11 January 2018. The proposed regulation would establish the joint undertaking for the period to 31 December 2026, and provide it with €486 million in EU funds from the Horizon 2020 and Connecting Europe Facility programmes as well as an equivalent contribution from the participating countries. The joint undertaking would be charged with the joint procurement of two pre-exascale supercomputers for the Union. It would also implement an HPC research and innovation programme to support the European HPC ecosystem in developing technologies to reach exascale performance by 2022-2023. The European Parliament, adopted its opinion during the July 2018 plenary session, and the Council adopted the text on 28 September 2018. The Council Regulation was published in the Official Journal of 8 October and entered into force on 28 October 2018. Third edition of a Briefing originally drafted by Vincent Reillon. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Strengthening EU cooperation on health technology assessment

18-06-2018

The impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal on strengthening EU cooperation on Health Technology Assessment clearly defines the problem, as well as the general and specific objectives. However, the IA does not appear to have succeeded in presenting a very convincing range of options. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic dimension, which is consistent with the manner in which the problems have been defined. In light of the reported concentration of SMEs in the medical ...

The impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal on strengthening EU cooperation on Health Technology Assessment clearly defines the problem, as well as the general and specific objectives. However, the IA does not appear to have succeeded in presenting a very convincing range of options. The analysis of impacts focuses on the economic dimension, which is consistent with the manner in which the problems have been defined. In light of the reported concentration of SMEs in the medical technologies sector (95 %), more emphasis could have been put on analysing the impacts of the retained options on them. The stakeholders' views have been illustrated in a satisfactory way. The evidence included or referenced in the IA is copious and up to date. The IA appears to have addressed most of the RSB's recommendations. Finally, the legislative proposal appears to be consistent with the analysis carried out in the IA.

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