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EU legislation and policies to fight racial and ethnic discrimination

23-03-2021

Racial and ethnic minorities face discrimination and its consequences on a daily basis. The exact scale of the problem is hard to gauge owing to a lack of data and general under-reporting of racist incidents. The pandemic has seen a major increase in reports of racist and xenophobic incidents, however, while racial and ethnic minority groups have been disproportionately affected by the crisis, with higher death and infection rates. Although since 2000 the European Union (EU) has introduced legislation ...

Racial and ethnic minorities face discrimination and its consequences on a daily basis. The exact scale of the problem is hard to gauge owing to a lack of data and general under-reporting of racist incidents. The pandemic has seen a major increase in reports of racist and xenophobic incidents, however, while racial and ethnic minority groups have been disproportionately affected by the crisis, with higher death and infection rates. Although since 2000 the European Union (EU) has introduced legislation to combat racial and xenophobic discrimination, the problem persists, with the need for new measures recently highlighted by the global Black Lives Matter protests. A number of studies also point to the cost of racial discrimination not only for the individuals concerned but also for society as a whole. For instance, a 2018 EPRS report argued that the loss in earnings caused by racial and ethnic discrimination for both individuals and societies amounts to billions of euros annually. The problem is also acknowledged by EU citizens: a 2019 survey found that over half of Europeans believe racial or ethnic discrimination to be widespread in their country. To address racial discrimination and its underlying inequalities, the European Commission has put forward a number of equality strategies and actions. The first European Summit against Racism was held on 19 March 2021. The European Parliament, meanwhile, has long been demanding an end to racial discrimination. In recent resolutions, Parliament has called for an end to structural racism and discrimination, racial profiling and police brutality, and for the right to protest peacefully.

Supporting Holocaust survivors

24-01-2019

Between 1933 and 1945, millions of Europeans suffered from Nazi crimes and the Holocaust. Today, the remaining survivors often live in difficult social conditions.

Between 1933 and 1945, millions of Europeans suffered from Nazi crimes and the Holocaust. Today, the remaining survivors often live in difficult social conditions.

Outcome of the meetings of EU Heads of State or Government, 13-14 December 2018

20-12-2018

The meetings on 13-14 2018 of EU Heads of State or Government dealt with a more comprehensive agenda than originally foreseen. The European Council set a timeline for the negotiations of the MFF, assessed the implementation of its comprehensive approach to migration, and announced an in-depth discussion on the Single Market for next spring. On external relations, it discussed the upcoming summit with the League of Arab States, expressed its concern regarding the escalation at the Azov Sea, welcomed ...

The meetings on 13-14 2018 of EU Heads of State or Government dealt with a more comprehensive agenda than originally foreseen. The European Council set a timeline for the negotiations of the MFF, assessed the implementation of its comprehensive approach to migration, and announced an in-depth discussion on the Single Market for next spring. On external relations, it discussed the upcoming summit with the League of Arab States, expressed its concern regarding the escalation at the Azov Sea, welcomed progress in the field of security and defence and addressed disinformation. Additionally, EU Heads of State or Government issued conclusions on climate change, fight against racism and xenophobia, as well as citizens' dialogues and citizens' consultations.

Combating anti-Muslim hatred in the EU

28-11-2018

Discrimination against minorities is against EU values and principles. However, research shows that discrimination against Muslims is becoming more common, and that it is increasingly supported by some political parties. EU secondary legislation on the issue is limited, and even grounds and areas of discrimination that are already covered need more work to ensure comprehensive protection. Nonetheless, several key legislative proposals are not making any progress, much to the regret of the European ...

Discrimination against minorities is against EU values and principles. However, research shows that discrimination against Muslims is becoming more common, and that it is increasingly supported by some political parties. EU secondary legislation on the issue is limited, and even grounds and areas of discrimination that are already covered need more work to ensure comprehensive protection. Nonetheless, several key legislative proposals are not making any progress, much to the regret of the European Parliament.

Equality and the Fight against Racism and Xenophobia

28-03-2018

This study specifically focuses on EU action and cooperation concerning equality and the fight against racism and xenophobia. Despite existing EU legislation and action it argues that there are still significant gaps and barriers to equal treatment and to adequate prevention and prosecution of, and compensation for, hate crimes within the European Union. The impact of the gaps and barriers identified – in action and cooperation – at EU level are assessed both in terms of economic impact and their ...

This study specifically focuses on EU action and cooperation concerning equality and the fight against racism and xenophobia. Despite existing EU legislation and action it argues that there are still significant gaps and barriers to equal treatment and to adequate prevention and prosecution of, and compensation for, hate crimes within the European Union. The impact of the gaps and barriers identified – in action and cooperation – at EU level are assessed both in terms of economic impact and their impacts on economic rights and freedoms. To address these gaps and barriers, the study provides some options for EU action in the field.

Research for CULT Committee - EU funding for cultural work with refugees: current practice and lessons learned

06-11-2017

This study is an overview of publically funded cultural projects with refugees as target group. These projects are analysed in the light of two interconnected challenges in contemporary Europe, the challenge of good governance of cultural diversity and refugees’ aspiration to a good life in Europe. It asks the fundamental question of what it is to live a good life together in Europe today and how cultural interventions can contribute to this aspiration.

This study is an overview of publically funded cultural projects with refugees as target group. These projects are analysed in the light of two interconnected challenges in contemporary Europe, the challenge of good governance of cultural diversity and refugees’ aspiration to a good life in Europe. It asks the fundamental question of what it is to live a good life together in Europe today and how cultural interventions can contribute to this aspiration.

Autor externo

Rasoul Nejadmehr

Research for CULT Committee - Why cultural work with refugees

06-11-2017

Cultural work with refugees has a long history. It is a contentious area. Instrumental approaches to cultural work with refugees raise significant issues. This briefing outlines the contentions, provides a theoretical basis for the work, gives leading examples of cultural work with refugees, including work that promotes intercultural understanding and work that promotes fear. It outlines key findings and recommendations, which have a substantial focus on ethical engagement, aesthetic importance and ...

Cultural work with refugees has a long history. It is a contentious area. Instrumental approaches to cultural work with refugees raise significant issues. This briefing outlines the contentions, provides a theoretical basis for the work, gives leading examples of cultural work with refugees, including work that promotes intercultural understanding and work that promotes fear. It outlines key findings and recommendations, which have a substantial focus on ethical engagement, aesthetic importance and societal wellbeing.

Autor externo

Prof Alison Phipps, University of Glasgow, UNESCO Chair in Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts

Research for CULT Committee - EU funding for cultural work with refugees: towards the next programme generation

06-11-2017

This briefing analyses the EU’s current programmes 2014-2020 that support cultural work with refugees in Europe and provides case studies of EU-funded projects in this field. It offers feedback from these projects, recommendations on the future programme generation, and suggests actions for the CULT Committee and its Members in order to inform and influence the future EU programme generation beyond 2020.

This briefing analyses the EU’s current programmes 2014-2020 that support cultural work with refugees in Europe and provides case studies of EU-funded projects in this field. It offers feedback from these projects, recommendations on the future programme generation, and suggests actions for the CULT Committee and its Members in order to inform and influence the future EU programme generation beyond 2020.

Autor externo

BIPE: Rosanna LEWIS (author), Polly MARTIN (co-author)

Area of freedom, security and justice:Untapped potential

27-10-2017

Since the entry into force of the 1997 Treaty of Amsterdam, the EU offers its citizens an area of freedom, security and justice (AFSJ). In this area, the free movement of persons should be ensured in conjunction with appropriate measures with respect to external border controls, asylum and migration, as well as the prevention and combating of crime. Since then, the Union has adopted its own Charter of Fundamental Rights, and the European Parliament has been fully engaged in shaping the AFSJ as a ...

Since the entry into force of the 1997 Treaty of Amsterdam, the EU offers its citizens an area of freedom, security and justice (AFSJ). In this area, the free movement of persons should be ensured in conjunction with appropriate measures with respect to external border controls, asylum and migration, as well as the prevention and combating of crime. Since then, the Union has adopted its own Charter of Fundamental Rights, and the European Parliament has been fully engaged in shaping the AFSJ as a co-legislator. Two decades later, however, the Union and its Member States still face major challenges in delivering this objective. Problems have been identified in upholding democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights, ensuring a high level of security (notably in the fight against corruption, organised crime and terrorism), protecting external borders, guaranteeing the right to asylum and developing a common migration policy. Surveys show that citizens expect the EU and its Member States to deliver in these areas, notably in the area of migration and the fight against terrorism and fraud. In October 2016, the Parliament's Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) Committee requested the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) to produce a 'Cost of Non-Europe Report' on the AFSJ. This paper contains an overview of the existing gaps and barriers in the main policy areas covered by the AFSJ, and assesses their economic impacts as well as impacts at individual level on fundamental rights and freedoms. It also assesses options for action at EU level that could address those gaps and barriers, together with an estimation of their potential cost and benefits.

EU action against anti-Semitism and Islamophobia

07-01-2016

Recent years have witnessed growing trends of anti-Semitism as well as a sharp increase in incidents and attacks directed towards members of the Muslim community. Attacks against Jewish communities in Toulouse, Brussels, Paris and Copenhagen, and verbal and physical violence against Muslim communities have shown the need for additional measures. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Recent years have witnessed growing trends of anti-Semitism as well as a sharp increase in incidents and attacks directed towards members of the Muslim community. Attacks against Jewish communities in Toulouse, Brussels, Paris and Copenhagen, and verbal and physical violence against Muslim communities have shown the need for additional measures. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

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