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Gender equality in the college of the European Court of Auditors

26-03-2021

This briefing on gender balance in the college of the European Court of Auditors aims to shed light on the balance between male and female members, from a historical perspective as the ECA has a reputation of being a rather male-dominated institution.

This briefing on gender balance in the college of the European Court of Auditors aims to shed light on the balance between male and female members, from a historical perspective as the ECA has a reputation of being a rather male-dominated institution.

Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence

17-03-2021

With the rise of new technology and social media gender-based cyber violence is a constantly growing threat with impacts at individual, social and economic levels, on women and girls and on society as generally. Action taken so far has been inadequate, and the cross-border nature of gender-based cyber violence has yet to be properly addressed either. This European added value assessment (EAVA) complements the European Parliament’s own initiative legislative report on Combating Gender based Violence ...

With the rise of new technology and social media gender-based cyber violence is a constantly growing threat with impacts at individual, social and economic levels, on women and girls and on society as generally. Action taken so far has been inadequate, and the cross-border nature of gender-based cyber violence has yet to be properly addressed either. This European added value assessment (EAVA) complements the European Parliament’s own initiative legislative report on Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence (2020/2035(INL)). The costs to individuals and society are substantial and shown to be in the order of €49.0 to €89.3 billion. A combination of legal and non-legal policy options would generate the greatest European added value, promote the fundamental rights of victims, reduce costs imposed on individuals and society, and support law enforcement and people working with victims.

The principles of equality and non discrimination, a comparative law perspective - United States of America

16-03-2021

This study forms part of a larger comparative law project which seeks to study the way that the principles of equality and non-discrimination have developed and are demonstrated in a broad range of legal systems around the world. The subject of this study is the principles of equality and non-discrimination in the United States federal legal system. It provides a brief history of the evolution of the principles of equality and non-discrimination developed in United States federal law and major events ...

This study forms part of a larger comparative law project which seeks to study the way that the principles of equality and non-discrimination have developed and are demonstrated in a broad range of legal systems around the world. The subject of this study is the principles of equality and non-discrimination in the United States federal legal system. It provides a brief history of the evolution of the principles of equality and non-discrimination developed in United States federal law and major events that furthered the development of the principles. It provides a detailed review of relevant constitutional, statutory, and case law with respect to these principles. The current and likely future limits of the principles of equality and non-discrimination are discussed in the context of three examples: (1) affirmative action in higher education, (2) racial and partisan gerrymandering, and (3) discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in public accommodations.

Women in arts and culture − Artists, not muses

05-03-2021

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

As in all other domains, women's place in arts and culture has not matched their ambitions and skills. Traditionally they were muses of male artists or amateur performing artists, and arts education for them was very limited. Despite good progress, there is still a lot to do to ensure women fully and freely contribute their artistic vision, hold positions of responsibility, and to recover the works of courageous women artists from the dusty archives of museums.

The Bauhaus movement: Where are the women?

03-03-2021

Bauhaus, arguably the most influential art and design movement in history, celebrated its centenary in 2019. While many of the avant-garde genres that helped shape modern art focused on painting, the Bauhaus movement encompassed a wide array of media, materials, and disciplines, ranging from the fine arts to architecture and design. Bauhaus is renowned for its smart use of resources, simplicity, effectiveness and polished, smooth lines. Its principles still influence the design of contemporary architecture ...

Bauhaus, arguably the most influential art and design movement in history, celebrated its centenary in 2019. While many of the avant-garde genres that helped shape modern art focused on painting, the Bauhaus movement encompassed a wide array of media, materials, and disciplines, ranging from the fine arts to architecture and design. Bauhaus is renowned for its smart use of resources, simplicity, effectiveness and polished, smooth lines. Its principles still influence the design of contemporary architecture and everyday objects, embodied in the belief that 'Less is more'. In an era when women had no access to public education in many fields, Bauhaus director Walter Gropius proclaimed that the institution would be open to 'any person of good repute, regardless of age or sex'. However, although the movement was largely populated by women, the names recorded in history are mainly those of men, while female Bauhaus creators are mostly remembered as their wives or assistants. Indeed, these pioneering creators were tolerated, rather than welcomed. By many accounts, the early years of the Bauhaus restricted women to areas deemed proper for their gender, such as textiles and weaving, while discouraging them from indulging in architecture, sculpture or painting. Similarly, no matter how talented, women had very little opportunity to teach at the school and did not receive apprenticeship certificates, which prevented them from acquiring master's diplomas and ultimately placed limits on their careers. In spite of these difficulties, women Bauhauslers arguably turned such constraints into an advantage. Under the direction of Gunta Stölzl, the Bauhaus weaving department became one of the school's most successful fields, with fabrics from the weaving workshop being very successful commercially. Architect Lilly Reich, metal designer Marianne Brandt, wood sculptor Alma Siedhoff Buscher and photographer Lucia Moholy are just some of those iconic Bauhaus figures. In recent years, an increasing number of museums pays tribute to their pioneering work and legacy.

Women in foreign affairs and international security: Still far from gender equality

03-03-2021

The debate on the participation and role of women in foreign affairs and international security is a timely and relevant one, and is being raised with increasing frequency at both national and international levels. In particular, there is growing attention to the imbalances in the representation of women in leadership and other key positions in the area of foreign and security policy, as well as to the growing body of evidence regarding the positive effect of including women in several key areas ...

The debate on the participation and role of women in foreign affairs and international security is a timely and relevant one, and is being raised with increasing frequency at both national and international levels. In particular, there is growing attention to the imbalances in the representation of women in leadership and other key positions in the area of foreign and security policy, as well as to the growing body of evidence regarding the positive effect of including women in several key areas of foreign and security policy. While gaps persist, women's representation at management and ministerial levels in the areas of foreign affairs and security has increased whether in the European Union (EU), the United States (US) or at the United Nations (UN) level. Among these issues, women's role in peacekeeping receives particular attention, as research has consistently shown that gender equality contributes to peace, and that peace negotiations involving women have a better chance of being sustainable and effective. Gender-equal societies enjoy better health, stronger economic growth and higher security. The UN and the EU have put pronounced emphasis on the issue in the past two decades. UN Security Council Resolution 1325 established the 'women, peace and security' (WPS) agenda in 2000. Since then, more WPS-related resolutions have been adopted, widening the scope and breadth of gendered peace and security. These resolutions have been instrumental in changing the philosophy and rhetoric focused on conflict and gender equality, thereby challenging the international community to do more. Several initiatives are also being implemented at EU level, including through the 2018 EU strategic approach to WPS. However, critics underline that a lot remains to be done, as women continue to be under-represented in the field of foreign and security policy across the world. This is an update of an EPRS briefing published in September 2019.

The coronavirus crisis: An emerging gender divide?

02-03-2021

The European Union remains severely hit by the coronavirus crisis, whose impact extends far beyond public health. The economic, social and psychological consequences of the pandemic are at the forefront of Member States’ and EU institutions’ concerns. Employment and working conditions have undergone major upheavals, raising the issue of a possible reversal of progress on gender equality. This infographic aims to shed light on the socioeconomic and psychological impacts of the pandemic on women, through ...

The European Union remains severely hit by the coronavirus crisis, whose impact extends far beyond public health. The economic, social and psychological consequences of the pandemic are at the forefront of Member States’ and EU institutions’ concerns. Employment and working conditions have undergone major upheavals, raising the issue of a possible reversal of progress on gender equality. This infographic aims to shed light on the socioeconomic and psychological impacts of the pandemic on women, through the lens of the transformation of the labour market, work-life balance and well-being. It is based on Eurostat data and a study conducted by Eurofound on living and working in the times of Covid-19.

Women's rights and well-being in a post-Covid world: Internet of things (IoT) and related abuses, new ways of working, teleworking, tele-learning, unpaid care and housework, women in leadership and decision-making process

02-03-2021

On the International Women’s Day, let us recall the context in which the current event is taking place. Just about a year ago, the World Health Organisation proclaimed the COVID 19 as the global pandemics. In the scope of several weeks, it has affected all the countries in the world and persists until this day, in spite of the existence of vaccines. Hence, further societal developments are uncertain and more changes within it are to be expected. In the sections below, the Policy Department tries ...

On the International Women’s Day, let us recall the context in which the current event is taking place. Just about a year ago, the World Health Organisation proclaimed the COVID 19 as the global pandemics. In the scope of several weeks, it has affected all the countries in the world and persists until this day, in spite of the existence of vaccines. Hence, further societal developments are uncertain and more changes within it are to be expected. In the sections below, the Policy Department tries to address the selected sectors of society affecting women and girls by changes resulting from the effects of the COVID 19 pandemics.

The Gender Gap in the EU’s Public Employment and Leadership

02-03-2021

This Study has been commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee. It provides a situational analysis of the gender gap in EU and Member States public sector, administration and sphere and identifies promising policy measures for reducing it.

This Study has been commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee. It provides a situational analysis of the gender gap in EU and Member States public sector, administration and sphere and identifies promising policy measures for reducing it.

Autor externo

Clara COTRONEO, Olivia BROWN, Iwona KARWOT - European Institute of Public Administration

Covid-19: The need for a gendered response

26-02-2021

In the midst of the current pandemic, adopting a gender perspective may seem a secondary concern. However, pandemics are known to affect women and men differently, making it essential to recognise these differences in order to understand the impacts on individuals and communities and to respond effectively and equitably. There is already clear evidence that the ongoing health, social and economic crisis is having gendered impacts. Disaggregated data show that sex and gender are playing a role in ...

In the midst of the current pandemic, adopting a gender perspective may seem a secondary concern. However, pandemics are known to affect women and men differently, making it essential to recognise these differences in order to understand the impacts on individuals and communities and to respond effectively and equitably. There is already clear evidence that the ongoing health, social and economic crisis is having gendered impacts. Disaggregated data show that sex and gender are playing a role in exposure to the virus and risks of severe outcomes, and that some groups of women and men are particularly vulnerable. Lockdown measures have led to an increase in violence against women and disrupted access to support services. Access to sexual and reproductive healthcare has also been affected. Successive lockdowns have widened the existing gender divide in unpaid care work that was already keeping more women than men out of the labour market. Greater work-life conflict is one of the factors leading to women's employment being worse hit than men's, with potential long-term impacts on women's employment, pay and career advancement. The pandemic has also brought the issue of women's participation in decision-making to the fore. Without a gender-sensitive approach, the pandemic could have far-reaching implications, including a real risk of exacerbating gender inequalities and sending progress into reverse. At the same time, gender mainstreaming tools such as gender impact assessments and gender budgeting exist that could, if used effectively, mitigate the negative consequences and contribute to achieving gender equality. Internationally and within the European Union (EU), there have been calls for gender-sensitive emergency and long-term responses. In January 2021, the European Parliament adopted a resolution setting out recommendations on both aspects.

Futuros eventos

28-06-2021
Child protection under EU law
Audição -
JURI
01-07-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable:The post-pandemic EU political system [...]
Outro evento -
EPRS
01-07-2021
AIDA-ECON Public Hearing on AI and Financial Services
Audição -
AIDA ECON

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