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Financing EU external action in the new MFF, 2021-2027: Heading 6 'Neighbourhood and the World'

13-11-2019

In May 2018, the European Commission published its proposals for the new multiannual financial framework (MFF), the EU's seven-year budget for the 2021-2027 period, followed by proposals for the MFF's individual sectoral programmes. In the proposals, financing external action is covered under Heading 6, 'Neighbourhood and the World', which replaces the current Heading 4, 'Global Europe'. Taking into account the evolving context both internationally and within the EU, as well as the conclusions of ...

In May 2018, the European Commission published its proposals for the new multiannual financial framework (MFF), the EU's seven-year budget for the 2021-2027 period, followed by proposals for the MFF's individual sectoral programmes. In the proposals, financing external action is covered under Heading 6, 'Neighbourhood and the World', which replaces the current Heading 4, 'Global Europe'. Taking into account the evolving context both internationally and within the EU, as well as the conclusions of the current MFF's mid-term review, the Commission has proposed changes to the EU external action budget in order to make it simpler and more flexible, and to enable the EU to engage more strategically with its partner countries in the future. The proposed Heading 6 comes with increased resources and important structural changes. It envisages merging the majority of the current stand-alone external financing instruments into a single one – the Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI) – as well as integrating into it the biggest EU external financing fund – the European Development Fund – currently outside the budget. Another proposed novelty is to set up an off-budget instrument – the European Peace Facility – to fund security and defence-related actions. With these changes, the Commission strives to take into account, among other things, the need for the EU to align its actions with its new and renewed international commitments under the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, the Paris Climate Agreement, the new EU Global Strategy, the European Consensus on Development, the European Neighbourhood Policy, and to make EU added value, relevance and credibility more visible. Negotiations on the 2021-2027 MFF are under way. The final decision is to be taken by the Council, acting by unanimity, with the European Parliament's consent. However, in view of current political realities and the financial implications of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, the adoption of a modern budget for the future remains a challenge that is not limited to Heading 6. Further developments are expected by the end of 2019.

Children's rights and the UN SDGs: A priority for EU external action

11-11-2019

The United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for sustainable development includes a strong commitment by all states to respect human rights, in line with international law and other relevant international documents, in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This covers the rights of the child as enshrined mainly in the UN Covenant on the Rights of the Child and other relevant human rights treaties. No action to implement the SDGs can be detrimental to the rights of the child. More ...

The United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for sustainable development includes a strong commitment by all states to respect human rights, in line with international law and other relevant international documents, in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This covers the rights of the child as enshrined mainly in the UN Covenant on the Rights of the Child and other relevant human rights treaties. No action to implement the SDGs can be detrimental to the rights of the child. More than a normative framework guiding the implementation of the SDGs, the rights of the child are a fundamental enabling factor for sustainable development and vice versa. Healthy, well-nourished, well-educated children, who are protected from violence and abuse, are the best guarantee of long-term sustainable development. On the other hand, the rights of the child can only be realised in an appropriate environment – peaceful, prosperous, protective of the child and fostering human development. Thus, there is a natural convergence between the SDGs and specific children's rights. The SDGs, through the comprehensive and regular monitoring they put in place, provide an opportunity for an assessment of the state of the most fundamental rights of the child, as enshrined in the Covenant. Most recent data actually warn that many relevant SDGs may not be achieved by 2030. While progress has been steady in certain areas, particularly on health-related issues, in others, progress has been less conclusive. The EU prioritises children's rights and relevant SDGs in its external action. It aims at mainstreaming human rights including children's rights in its development assistance to connect the normative and developmental dimensions. The European Parliament has repeatedly defended the need to protect and promote children's rights through EU external action, and has asked the Commission to propose a strategy and action plan in this sense.

The ESM and the IMF: comparison of the main features

27-04-2018

This document provides a comparison of the main objectives, tools and governance structures of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). It contributes to the debate on recent proposal regarding the possible evolution of the ESM into a “European Monetary Fund”, in the wider context of the discussions on how to strengthen the governance of Economic and Monetary Union. The note also presents summaries of three external papers prepared in spring 2017, upon ...

This document provides a comparison of the main objectives, tools and governance structures of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and of the International Monetary Fund (IMF). It contributes to the debate on recent proposal regarding the possible evolution of the ESM into a “European Monetary Fund”, in the wider context of the discussions on how to strengthen the governance of Economic and Monetary Union. The note also presents summaries of three external papers prepared in spring 2017, upon a request of the Economic and Monetary Committee on this subject.

CJEU Opinion on the EU-Singapore Agreement

29-05-2017

In 2015, the European Commission requested the opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) on the competence for conclusion of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA). The CJEU issued its opinion on 16 May 2017, holding that the EUSFTA covers shared competences with respect to: (i) non-direct foreign investment, (ii) investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and (iii) state-to-state dispute settlement relating to provisions regarding portfolio investment and ISDS. In its current form, ...

In 2015, the European Commission requested the opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) on the competence for conclusion of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA). The CJEU issued its opinion on 16 May 2017, holding that the EUSFTA covers shared competences with respect to: (i) non-direct foreign investment, (ii) investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and (iii) state-to-state dispute settlement relating to provisions regarding portfolio investment and ISDS. In its current form, therefore, the agreement would need to be concluded as a ‘mixed agreement’.

EU external action: Refugees and migrants

29-03-2017

An unprecedented mass movement of asylum-seekers and migrants of all ages to the EU started in 2014, reached a peak in 2015 and then continued in 2016 and into 2017. A coordinated and effective protective response is essential, and that needs both a gender and child-sensitive dimension. The European Parliament is expected to vote on a motion for a resolution on 'Addressing refugee and migrant movements: the role of EU External Action' during the April I plenary session.

An unprecedented mass movement of asylum-seekers and migrants of all ages to the EU started in 2014, reached a peak in 2015 and then continued in 2016 and into 2017. A coordinated and effective protective response is essential, and that needs both a gender and child-sensitive dimension. The European Parliament is expected to vote on a motion for a resolution on 'Addressing refugee and migrant movements: the role of EU External Action' during the April I plenary session.

EU strategy in the Horn of Africa

07-12-2016

The Horn of Africa countries are plagued by violence and insecurity. A hub on the Red Sea trade and migration route, bordering the unstable areas of the Sahel and central Africa, the region is of strategic interest for the European Union. The EU has adopted an integrated framework to align various external policy programmes and instruments aimed at securing the region. However, strong antagonisms between the states concerned add to the difficulty of achieving a coordinated approach.

The Horn of Africa countries are plagued by violence and insecurity. A hub on the Red Sea trade and migration route, bordering the unstable areas of the Sahel and central Africa, the region is of strategic interest for the European Union. The EU has adopted an integrated framework to align various external policy programmes and instruments aimed at securing the region. However, strong antagonisms between the states concerned add to the difficulty of achieving a coordinated approach.

Implementation of the Lisbon Treaty - Improving Functioning of the EU: Foreign Affairs, Update September 2016

15-06-2016

Foreign Affairs as field of EU action has very distinctive constitutional qualities. Its external powers are broad, encompassing not only traditional foreign policy, but also development cooperation and number of sectorial policies such as trade, transport and environment. This revised and expanded report provides an analysis of the changes in the constitutional and institutional framework brought about by the Lisbon Treaty and assess the implementation of those changes including obstacles to further ...

Foreign Affairs as field of EU action has very distinctive constitutional qualities. Its external powers are broad, encompassing not only traditional foreign policy, but also development cooperation and number of sectorial policies such as trade, transport and environment. This revised and expanded report provides an analysis of the changes in the constitutional and institutional framework brought about by the Lisbon Treaty and assess the implementation of those changes including obstacles to further improvement of its implementation. This updated version takes another look on the matters of competence and mixed agreements as well on the role of the ECJ in foreign affairs.

Autor externo

Marise CREMONA

The EU's global strategy [What Think Tanks are thinking]

27-05-2016

The European Council decided last year that the EU needs a new, comprehensive global strategy to face the growing challenges of globalisation, shifts in economic and political power and  expanding zones of conflict and instability. Federica Mogherini, High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, is to present such a strategy during the European Council meeting in June 2016. Phenomena such as the digital revolution, climate change, competition for resources, growing inequality ...

The European Council decided last year that the EU needs a new, comprehensive global strategy to face the growing challenges of globalisation, shifts in economic and political power and  expanding zones of conflict and instability. Federica Mogherini, High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, is to present such a strategy during the European Council meeting in June 2016. Phenomena such as the digital revolution, climate change, competition for resources, growing inequality and aging populations will require smart policies and tough decisions if the EU is to avoid a decline of its global leverage. Some useful analysis of the challenges and choices facing the Union were presented in a 2015 report by the European Strategy and Policy Analysis System (ESPAS), an inter-institutional project, entitled 'Global Trends to 2030: Can the EU meet the challenges ahead?' This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports from major international think tanks on the EU's global strategy and related issues.

The Implications of International Economic and Financial Governance Agenda for EU Trade and Investment Policy

09-12-2015

Many of the rules, norms, principles and practices that are central to EU trade and investment policy today have been influenced by a wide range of different types of international organisations (IOs). This influence occurs through formal rulemaking, voluntary codes of conduct or standards, the provision of technical and scientific expertise or the dissemination of research and best practice. The influence is pervasive and decisions taken years ago in IOs can shape EU trade policy today. With the ...

Many of the rules, norms, principles and practices that are central to EU trade and investment policy today have been influenced by a wide range of different types of international organisations (IOs). This influence occurs through formal rulemaking, voluntary codes of conduct or standards, the provision of technical and scientific expertise or the dissemination of research and best practice. The influence is pervasive and decisions taken years ago in IOs can shape EU trade policy today. With the difficulties facing multilateral approaches to rulemaking in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) the impact of other IOs has increased.

The Lisbon Treaty's Provisions on CFSP/CSDP - State of Implementation

02-10-2015

Since the Treaty of Lisbon entered into force in December 2009, major efforts have been made to implement the new institutional set-up it created: the EU has acquired legal personality, the post of Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy has been created, the European External Action Service has been operationalised, and the EU Delegations around the world have boosted the EU’s presence and increased diplomatic and policy outreach. The European ...

Since the Treaty of Lisbon entered into force in December 2009, major efforts have been made to implement the new institutional set-up it created: the EU has acquired legal personality, the post of Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy has been created, the European External Action Service has been operationalised, and the EU Delegations around the world have boosted the EU’s presence and increased diplomatic and policy outreach. The European Parliament has also acquired a greater role thanks to the Lisbon Treaty, particularly in the fields of foreign policy oversight and budgetary scrutiny. Nevertheless, many provisions of the Lisbon Treaty, designed to provide a boost to foreign, security and defence policies, remain non-implemented owing to a lack of political support stemming from the fears of some EU Member States of the creation of a ‘two-speed Europe’ and loss of control over these fields in favour of the EU institutions.

Futuros eventos

07-12-2020
Health and environmental impacts of 5G
Seminário -
STOA
07-12-2020
What role can trade policy play to advance the objectives of the Green Deal?
Audição -
INTA
07-12-2020
Public Hearing on Women's Rights Defenders
Audição -
FEMM

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