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European Parliament: Facts and Figures

29-03-2019

This Briefing, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service, is designed to provide key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both in the 2014 to 2019 parliamentary term now drawing to a close - and in the seven previous terms since direct elections were introduced in June 1979. On the following pages you will find graphics of various kinds which: • detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; • trace the increase in the number of parties represented ...

This Briefing, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service, is designed to provide key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both in the 2014 to 2019 parliamentary term now drawing to a close - and in the seven previous terms since direct elections were introduced in June 1979. On the following pages you will find graphics of various kinds which: • detail the composition of the European Parliament now and in the past; • trace the increase in the number of parties represented in the EP and evolution of political groups; • chart the rise in the number of women sitting in the Parliament; • explain the electoral systems used in elections to the Parliament across the Member States; • show how turnout in European elections compares with that in national elections; • summarise the activity of the Parliament in the 2014-19 term, and in the 2009-14 term; • present the annual cost of the Parliament compared with other parliaments; • outline the composition of the Parliament’s main governing bodies. The Briefing has been updated regularly during the 2014-19 term to take account of latest developments.

Conciliation agreement on the 2018 EU budget

24-11-2017

On 18 November, European Parliament and Council negotiators reached a provisional agreement on the 2018 EU budget. The joint text, which provides for total commitments of €160.11 billion and total payments of €144.68 billion, is expected to be adopted by the Council and then voted on by the Parliament during the November II plenary session.

On 18 November, European Parliament and Council negotiators reached a provisional agreement on the 2018 EU budget. The joint text, which provides for total commitments of €160.11 billion and total payments of €144.68 billion, is expected to be adopted by the Council and then voted on by the Parliament during the November II plenary session.

Autor externo

Jędrzejewska, Sidonia

Discharge for the 2015 budget – Council and European Council

23-10-2017

During the October II plenary session, the European Parliament is due to bring to a close the discharge procedure for the Council's financial accounts for the year 2015, by voting on the second report of the Committee on Budgetary Control. For several years in a row now, the Parliament has refused to grant discharge to the Council and the European Council.

During the October II plenary session, the European Parliament is due to bring to a close the discharge procedure for the Council's financial accounts for the year 2015, by voting on the second report of the Committee on Budgetary Control. For several years in a row now, the Parliament has refused to grant discharge to the Council and the European Council.

Council discharge by the European Parliament - Finding solutions

15-06-2017

This study synthesises the main arguments behind the disagreement between the Parliament and the Council over the issue of whether the discharge procedure allows the Parliament to hold the Council to account concerning the management of its own administrative budget. It then examines the discharge procedure as an accountability mechanism and its impact on the EU legitimacy. It concludes that significant improvement is needed, regardless of which exit to the conflict is chosen. Four scenarios to break ...

This study synthesises the main arguments behind the disagreement between the Parliament and the Council over the issue of whether the discharge procedure allows the Parliament to hold the Council to account concerning the management of its own administrative budget. It then examines the discharge procedure as an accountability mechanism and its impact on the EU legitimacy. It concludes that significant improvement is needed, regardless of which exit to the conflict is chosen. Four scenarios to break the deadlock are put forward, assessing their respective advantages and shortcomings.

Autor externo

Dr Maria-Luisa Sanchez-Barrueco (Senior Lecturer in EU Law, University of Deusto) ; Dr Paul Stephenson (Assistant Professor, Maastricht University)

Estimates of Parliament's 2017 budget

12-04-2016

The budget of the European Parliament (EP), which accounts for less than 1.2% of the EU general budget, covers the administrative expenditure that ensures the functioning of an institution with 751 Members and 24 official languages. On 14 April 2016, the plenary is scheduled to vote on a report defining the priority objectives and proposed budget of the EP for next year.

The budget of the European Parliament (EP), which accounts for less than 1.2% of the EU general budget, covers the administrative expenditure that ensures the functioning of an institution with 751 Members and 24 official languages. On 14 April 2016, the plenary is scheduled to vote on a report defining the priority objectives and proposed budget of the EP for next year.

Draft Amending Budget (DAB) No 1/2016: Instrument for Emergency Support and Europol

07-04-2016

DAB No 1/2016 deals with two different European Commission proposals: the provision of the initial financial means for the new instrument aimed at delivering emergency support inside the European Union (EU); and an increase in the staffing of the recently created European Counter-Terrorism Centre within Europol. The European Parliament has fast-tracked its examination of the proposals, while the Council also rapidly adopted its own position on the DAB.

DAB No 1/2016 deals with two different European Commission proposals: the provision of the initial financial means for the new instrument aimed at delivering emergency support inside the European Union (EU); and an increase in the staffing of the recently created European Counter-Terrorism Centre within Europol. The European Parliament has fast-tracked its examination of the proposals, while the Council also rapidly adopted its own position on the DAB.

Hearing of Mrs. Elke Köning, Chair of the Single Resolution Board. ECON on 28 January 2016

25-01-2016

The Single Resolution Board (SRB) was established on 1 January 2015 and on 1 January 2016 it became fully responsible for the resolution of those banks which are directly supervised by the ECB and of other cross-border groups. This briefing presents the state of play regarding the work of the SRB as well as a short insight into the vulnerability of those banks which are directly supervised by the Single Supervisory Board (SSB). It is published in advance of the Hearing with Mrs Elke König, Chair ...

The Single Resolution Board (SRB) was established on 1 January 2015 and on 1 January 2016 it became fully responsible for the resolution of those banks which are directly supervised by the ECB and of other cross-border groups. This briefing presents the state of play regarding the work of the SRB as well as a short insight into the vulnerability of those banks which are directly supervised by the Single Supervisory Board (SSB). It is published in advance of the Hearing with Mrs Elke König, Chair of the SRB, in the ECON Committee on 28 January in accordance with Article 45.4 of Regulation (EU) 806/2014.

The Single Supervisory Mechanism (SSM): Costs and Financing

14-10-2015

The ECB is responsible for the effective and consistent functioning of the SSM and oversees the system. The costs of the ECB supervisory tasks are covered by levying an annual fee on all supervised banks. The fee is calculated according to the bank's importance and its risk profile.

The ECB is responsible for the effective and consistent functioning of the SSM and oversees the system. The costs of the ECB supervisory tasks are covered by levying an annual fee on all supervised banks. The fee is calculated according to the bank's importance and its risk profile.

Rules on political groups in the EP

19-06-2015

Members of the European Parliament may form political groups; these are not organised by nationality, but by political affiliation. At the start of the current parliamentary term there were seven political groups in the Parliament, as there were throughout the 2009-14 period. The formation of a new, eighth, political group, to be called Europe of Nations and Freedoms, has been announced recently. To form a political group, a minimum of 25 MEPs, elected from at least one quarter (currently seven ...

Members of the European Parliament may form political groups; these are not organised by nationality, but by political affiliation. At the start of the current parliamentary term there were seven political groups in the Parliament, as there were throughout the 2009-14 period. The formation of a new, eighth, political group, to be called Europe of Nations and Freedoms, has been announced recently. To form a political group, a minimum of 25 MEPs, elected from at least one quarter (currently seven) of the EU's Member States is required. Those Members (MEPs) who do not belong to any political group are known as 'non-attached' (non-inscrits) Members. Although the political groups play a very prominent role in Parliament's life, individual MEPs and/or several MEPs acting together also have many rights, including in respect of the exercise of oversight over other EU institutions, such as the Commission. However, belonging to a political group is of a particular relevance for the allocation of key positions in Parliament's political and organisational structures, such as committee and delegation chairs and rapporteurships on important dossiers. Moreover, political groups receive higher funding for their collective staff and parliamentary activities than the non-attached MEPs. Political-group funding is however to be distinguished from funding granted to European political parties and foundations, which, if they comply with the requirements to register as such, may apply for funding from the European Parliament if they are represented in Parliament by at least one Member. This briefing updates an earlier one of June 2014.

Parliament’s estimates of its 2016 budget

20-04-2015

On 29 April 2015, the European Parliament (EP) is scheduled to vote on a report defining its priority objectives and proposed budget for next year as part of the procedure to establish the 2016 general budget of the European Union (EU). The EP's budget accounts for around 1.2% of the EU budget.

On 29 April 2015, the European Parliament (EP) is scheduled to vote on a report defining its priority objectives and proposed budget for next year as part of the procedure to establish the 2016 general budget of the European Union (EU). The EP's budget accounts for around 1.2% of the EU budget.

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