14

Resultado(s)

Palavra(s)
Tipo de publicação
Domínio de intervenção
Autor
Palavra-chave
Data

Regulating imports of cultural goods

28-06-2019

Until now, with the exception of two specific measures for Iraq and Syria, there has been no EU legislation covering the import of cultural goods from non-EU countries entering the EU. By ensuring that these imports are subject to uniform controls along all EU external borders, the new regulation aims to prevent the introduction, import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illegally removed from a third country, thereby protecting cultural heritage and combatting illegal trade, in particular where ...

Until now, with the exception of two specific measures for Iraq and Syria, there has been no EU legislation covering the import of cultural goods from non-EU countries entering the EU. By ensuring that these imports are subject to uniform controls along all EU external borders, the new regulation aims to prevent the introduction, import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illegally removed from a third country, thereby protecting cultural heritage and combatting illegal trade, in particular where it may serve as an income source for terrorist groups. Both Parliament and Council agreed positions on the Commission’ proposal in autumn 2018, and reached an agreement in trilogue negotiations in December that year. Adopted by both institutions in spring 2019, the new regulation lays down the conditions for the introduction, as well as the conditions and procedures for the import, of cultural goods from third countries. The regulation does not apply to cultural goods that have been created or discovered in the EU. To focus the measures established by the regulation on the goods considered most at risk of pillage in conflict areas and to avoid a disproportionate burden for licit trade, the new legislative act introduces age and value thresholds for certain goods categories. The regulation will apply at the latest six years after it comes into force, i.e. from June 2025. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Customs 2020 and Fiscalis 2020 (2014-2020)

13-12-2018

The Customs 2020 programme was established by Regulation No 1294/2013 and is aimed at supporting the functioning of the customs union. The Fiscalis 2020 programme was established by Regulation No 1286/2013 and is aimed at improving the operation of the taxation systems in the internal market and supporting cooperation between the EU Member States.

The Customs 2020 programme was established by Regulation No 1294/2013 and is aimed at supporting the functioning of the customs union. The Fiscalis 2020 programme was established by Regulation No 1286/2013 and is aimed at improving the operation of the taxation systems in the internal market and supporting cooperation between the EU Member States.

Money laundering and tax evasion risks in free ports

17-10-2018

Freeports are conducive to secrecy. In their preferential treatment, they resemble offshore financial centres, offering both high security and discretion and allowing transactions to be made without attracting attention of regulators and direct tax authorities. This study argues that the legal anti-money laundering and tax evasion framework in place in the EU (and elsewhere) is only partially effective in combatting money laundering and tax evasion.

Freeports are conducive to secrecy. In their preferential treatment, they resemble offshore financial centres, offering both high security and discretion and allowing transactions to be made without attracting attention of regulators and direct tax authorities. This study argues that the legal anti-money laundering and tax evasion framework in place in the EU (and elsewhere) is only partially effective in combatting money laundering and tax evasion.

Union Customs Code

26-09-2018

The study examines whether the Union Customs Code is being properly implemented for the benefit of the European consumers, businesses and EU budget. It covers the complex legislative and administrative framework of the UCC and its governance structure. It assesses the impact of the transitional measures attached to the UCC. It moreover addresses the specific challenges raised in the area of E-Commerce.

The study examines whether the Union Customs Code is being properly implemented for the benefit of the European consumers, businesses and EU budget. It covers the complex legislative and administrative framework of the UCC and its governance structure. It assesses the impact of the transitional measures attached to the UCC. It moreover addresses the specific challenges raised in the area of E-Commerce.

Import of cultural goods

19-12-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 13 July 2017 and now under discussion in Parliament and Council. The proposal aims to prevent the import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illicitly exported from a third country, in order to reduce trafficking in cultural goods, combat terrorism financing and protect cultural heritage, especially archaeological objects ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, adopted on 13 July 2017 and now under discussion in Parliament and Council. The proposal aims to prevent the import and storage in the EU of cultural goods illicitly exported from a third country, in order to reduce trafficking in cultural goods, combat terrorism financing and protect cultural heritage, especially archaeological objects in source countries affected by armed conflict (explanatory memorandum of the proposal, p. 3). The market for antiques, ancient art and collectibles of older age constitutes 24 % of the global legal art and antiques market. The European market share accounts for 35 % of this global market, with the UK in the lead with 24 % (due to its large auction houses), followed by Switzerland (6 %), France (5 %), Germany (3 %), and Austria, Spain and the Netherlands (each around 0.5% respectively). Based on Eurostat figures, the estimated annual value of imports of classical antiquities and ancient art declared to EU customs may be around €3.7 billion per year (IA, p. 10). The IA explains that the current Common Nomenclature tariff heading (9705) used for import of antiquities and ancient art objects is rather broad, including also a variety of other goods of interest to collectors, making it difficult to estimate the total EU imports of cultural goods (IA, p. 10). Regarding the illicit trade of cultural goods, there are numerous underlying factors, which cannot be changed by this initiative, according to the IA (p. 11). These include, for example, poverty and military conflicts prevalent in many regions rich in cultural heritage sites, technological progress in various digging tools (such as metal-detectors, power drills, explosives), the market demand for such objects, mostly concentrated in Europe and North America, as well as cross-border transaction and e-commerce (IA, pp. 11-12). Estimates show that 80-90 % of global antiquities sales are of goods with illicit origin, and these sales are worth US$3 to 6 billion annually (IA, p. 12). The illicit sales of cultural goods often stem from terrorist activities and serve as a means to finance terrorism (IA, p. 14). For example, the Islamist profit from illicit trade in antiquities and archaeological treasures is estimated at US$150-200 million (IA, p. 15).

Analysis and Effects of the Different Member States’ Customs Sanctioning Systems

15-01-2016

This Study provides an analysis of the effects of the present divergence of the customs sanctioning systems of the Member States of the EU, as well as of the proposal of the European Commission for a Directive to harmonise the customs infringements and sanctions. A number of conclusions and recommendations on the preferred model for the EU is provided. The Study was prepared for Policy Department A on the request of European Parliament´s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

This Study provides an analysis of the effects of the present divergence of the customs sanctioning systems of the Member States of the EU, as well as of the proposal of the European Commission for a Directive to harmonise the customs infringements and sanctions. A number of conclusions and recommendations on the preferred model for the EU is provided. The Study was prepared for Policy Department A on the request of European Parliament´s Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

Autor externo

Ruud TUSVELD (PwC), Moritz GODEL (London Economics), André STOOP (PwC) and Matthijs VAN DER KEMP (PwC)

Customs Issues Falling under INTA’s New Remit

21-12-2015

The relation between European Union (EU) trade and customs policies is complex. The customs authorities have an executive function in the administration of trade policy as well as the control of borders, but they also remain accountable to trade policy makers for their performance. Other European Parliament committees touch upon the subject of customs, too. Greater co-ordination may be achieved by encouraging the development of Customs specific performance indicators that can be used for periodic ...

The relation between European Union (EU) trade and customs policies is complex. The customs authorities have an executive function in the administration of trade policy as well as the control of borders, but they also remain accountable to trade policy makers for their performance. Other European Parliament committees touch upon the subject of customs, too. Greater co-ordination may be achieved by encouraging the development of Customs specific performance indicators that can be used for periodic reporting to the European Parliament and elsewhere. A specialist EU Trade Facilitation Agency or Body may be required to monitor the performance of Customs and other border agencies at home and abroad. Such an Agency or Body could also help propagate best practices. The WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement’s Article 13 could provide the foundation for such a European Trade Facilitation Body.

Autor externo

Andrew GRAINGER

TTIP: Challenges and Opportunities in the Area of Customs and Trade Facilities

31-08-2015

The trade costs associated with customs and other border controls become more important as tariff barriers are reduced. The EU is in the process of further modernisation of is customs code. It also needs to work with the EU’s trading partners to facilitate trade while protecting consumer interests and the security of the international supply chain. The negotiations on TTIP offer a means of building on existing agreements to further this aim. This paper is about how to make customs more efficient. ...

The trade costs associated with customs and other border controls become more important as tariff barriers are reduced. The EU is in the process of further modernisation of is customs code. It also needs to work with the EU’s trading partners to facilitate trade while protecting consumer interests and the security of the international supply chain. The negotiations on TTIP offer a means of building on existing agreements to further this aim. This paper is about how to make customs more efficient. Others in this series of eight, prepared by Policy Department A for the IMCO Committee, cover the substantive issues in technical barriers to trade, services, procurement and the sectors of textiles and clothing, motor vehicles and machinery sectors. A further paper covers the horizontal issues in regulatory cooperation.

Indication of origin marking on products

06-05-2013

Non-food products imported into the EU currently require no labelling or marking of the country from which they originate. In January 2013, the European Commission made a new proposal to introduce obligatory indication of origin on non-food consumer products as part of the product safety and market surveillance package.

Non-food products imported into the EU currently require no labelling or marking of the country from which they originate. In January 2013, the European Commission made a new proposal to introduce obligatory indication of origin on non-food consumer products as part of the product safety and market surveillance package.

Implementation of the Modernised Customs Code

15-02-2012

The aim of this study is to examine the challenges and conditions relating to the implementation of the Modernised Customs Code. The study identifies and assesses the legal, IT technical and operational issues in view of the implementation of the Modernised Customs Code.

The aim of this study is to examine the challenges and conditions relating to the implementation of the Modernised Customs Code. The study identifies and assesses the legal, IT technical and operational issues in view of the implementation of the Modernised Customs Code.

Autor externo

Ine Lejeune, Ruud Tusveld, Dirk Aerts, Jos Verstraten, Nico Bogaerts and Michael Van de Velde (PwC Belgium / PwC the Netherlands)

Futuros eventos

26-10-2020
European Gender Equality Week - October 26-29, 2020
Outro evento -
FEMM
27-10-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | Beyond Christendom - The politics of religion in Europe today
Outro evento -
EPRS
27-10-2020
JURI: ICM Meeting on "Better Law Making from a digital perspective"
Outro evento -
JURI

Parceiros