70

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Reception of asylum-seekers - recast Directive

29-03-2019

States must treat asylum-seekers and refugees according to the appropriate standards laid down in human rights and refugee law. The current migration crisis revealed wide divergences in the level of reception conditions provided by Member States. While some are facing problems in ensuring adequate and dignified treatment of applicants, in others the standards of reception provided are more generous. This has led to secondary movements of asylum-seekers and refugees, and has put pressure on certain ...

States must treat asylum-seekers and refugees according to the appropriate standards laid down in human rights and refugee law. The current migration crisis revealed wide divergences in the level of reception conditions provided by Member States. While some are facing problems in ensuring adequate and dignified treatment of applicants, in others the standards of reception provided are more generous. This has led to secondary movements of asylum-seekers and refugees, and has put pressure on certain Member States. The aim of the proposed recast directive, which would replace the current Reception Conditions Directive, is to ensure greater harmonisation of reception standards and more equal treatment of asylum-seekers across all Member States, as well as to avoid ‘asylum shopping’ whereby asylum-seekers choose the Member State with the highest protection standards for their application. Although the co-legislators reached provisional agreement on the proposal in trilogue, Coreper was not able to confirm the Council’s support for that text and trilogue negotiations have yet to restart. Fourth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

A global compact on migration: Placing human rights at the heart of migration management

11-01-2019

The global flow of refugees and migrants poses challenges, opportunities and obligations for countries around the world. At the very heart of the debate on migration management is how to ensure that the different interests and needs are addressed within a strong human rights framework. The United Nations (UN) is investigating the issue in great depth, and one of the main outcomes of the UN General Assembly in 2016 was a declaration demanding greater international cooperation on managing migration ...

The global flow of refugees and migrants poses challenges, opportunities and obligations for countries around the world. At the very heart of the debate on migration management is how to ensure that the different interests and needs are addressed within a strong human rights framework. The United Nations (UN) is investigating the issue in great depth, and one of the main outcomes of the UN General Assembly in 2016 was a declaration demanding greater international cooperation on managing migration. This declaration was widely endorsed, including by the European Union (EU). As a result, two global compacts have been adopted in 2018, for refugees and for other migrants; this briefing will focus on the latter. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN migration agency in charge of the global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration, these compacts 'provide the opportunity to move ahead in strengthening the norms, principles, rules and decision-making processes that will allow for more effective international cooperation in responding to what is a defining issue'. Providing continued institutional support to address these issues and implement the outcomes of the global compacts will be a challenge. This an updated version of a briefing from December 2017, jointly authored by Joanna Apap, Daniela Adorna Diaz and Gonzalo Urbina Trevino. See also our infographic, Migration flows to the EU, PE 621.862.

The global compact on refugees: Strengthening international cooperation to ease the plight of refugees in the world

11-01-2019

Recent large-scale flows of refugees and migrants have brought to the world's attention more forcefully than ever the plight of persons who are forced to flee their homes because of war, insecurity or persecution. They have also exposed how ill-prepared the international community has been to deal with this challenge and how uneven the distribution of the burden of caring for such people has been among countries. In 2016, to enhance preparedness for refugee crises, improve the situation of refugees ...

Recent large-scale flows of refugees and migrants have brought to the world's attention more forcefully than ever the plight of persons who are forced to flee their homes because of war, insecurity or persecution. They have also exposed how ill-prepared the international community has been to deal with this challenge and how uneven the distribution of the burden of caring for such people has been among countries. In 2016, to enhance preparedness for refugee crises, improve the situation of refugees and relieve the burden on host societies, the United Nations (UN) member states convened in New York and adopted a declaration paving the way for a non-binding international compact on refugees. They annexed to this declaration a comprehensive refugee response framework that spelled out a series of short- and longer-term measures to address refugee crises. The framework has been applied in several pilot countries and the lessons learnt fed into a global compact on refugees. The compact was drafted by the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) following broad consultations with various stakeholders, and its definitive version was adopted by the UN General Assembly with a large majority on 17 December 2018. The global compact focuses on international-, regional- and national-level mechanisms for achieving a fairer distribution of the responsibilities related to refugees, and on areas where action can be improved. It has been criticised, among other things, for its non-binding character and for excluding victims of natural disasters from its scope. This is an updated edition of a Briefing published in June 2018.

Outlook for the European Council and Euro Summit, 13-14 December 2018

07-12-2018

EU leaders’ discussions will mainly focus on the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), the single market and migration. EU leaders will hold their first substantial exchange of views on the 2021-2027 MFF, debating its political priorities, the overall level of expenditure and the timetable for the MFF negotiations. On migration and the single market, the European Council will review the implementation and state of play of its previous orientations. Other items to be addressed include the ...

EU leaders’ discussions will mainly focus on the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), the single market and migration. EU leaders will hold their first substantial exchange of views on the 2021-2027 MFF, debating its political priorities, the overall level of expenditure and the timetable for the MFF negotiations. On migration and the single market, the European Council will review the implementation and state of play of its previous orientations. Other items to be addressed include the challenge of disinformation, the fight against racism and xenophobia and climate change, as well as external relations, in particular the preparation of the EU-Arab summit on 24-25 February 2019. They will also be informed on preparations for the 2019-202 4Strategic Agenda. The Euro Summit is expected to discuss the reform of European Monetary Union as well as the taxation of digital companies.

Outcome of the meetings of EU Heads of State or Government, 17-18 October 2018

19-10-2018

The European Council (Article 50) meeting of 17 October 2018 made neither made progress towards finalising a withdrawal agreement nor decide on holding an extraordinary summit on Brexit. At the European Council meeting of 18 October 2018, EU leaders stressed the need to cooperate with countries of origin and transit as well as fighting people smuggling-networks. On internal security they adopted conclusions regarding many of the new threats the EU is facing, including cyber-attacks, disinformation ...

The European Council (Article 50) meeting of 17 October 2018 made neither made progress towards finalising a withdrawal agreement nor decide on holding an extraordinary summit on Brexit. At the European Council meeting of 18 October 2018, EU leaders stressed the need to cooperate with countries of origin and transit as well as fighting people smuggling-networks. On internal security they adopted conclusions regarding many of the new threats the EU is facing, including cyber-attacks, disinformation campaigns, and terrorism. Additionally they addressed a number of external relations related issues, such as EU-Africa relations, the upcoming EU League of Arab States meeting and Climate change.

The Cost of Non-Europe in Asylum Policy

18-10-2018

Current structural weaknesses and shortcomings in the design and implementation of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) have a cost of EUR 50.5 billion per year, including costs due to irregular migration, lack of accountability in external action, inefficiencies in asylum procedures, poor living conditions and health, and dimmer employment prospects leading to lower generation of tax revenue. Seven policy options for the EU to tackle the identified gaps and barriers would bring about many benefits ...

Current structural weaknesses and shortcomings in the design and implementation of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) have a cost of EUR 50.5 billion per year, including costs due to irregular migration, lack of accountability in external action, inefficiencies in asylum procedures, poor living conditions and health, and dimmer employment prospects leading to lower generation of tax revenue. Seven policy options for the EU to tackle the identified gaps and barriers would bring about many benefits including better compliance with international and EU norms and values, lower levels of irregular migration to the EU and costs of border security and surveillance, increased effectiveness and efficiency of the asylum process, faster socio-economic integration of asylum-seekers, increased employment and tax revenues and reinforced protection of human rights in countries of return. Once, considered the costs, the net benefits of these policy options would be at least EUR 23.5 billion per year.

Externý autor

Navarra, Cecilia; Ballegooij, Wouter van;

Outlook for the meetings of EU Heads of State or Government, 17-18 October 2018

16-10-2018

As has become the norm with European Council meetings, EU Heads of State or Government will convene on 17 and 18 October 2018 in different formats with varying compositions and levels of formality: a regular meeting of the European Council, and an enlarged Euro Summit of 27 Member States on 18 October, preceded by a European Council (Article 50) meeting on the 17 October over dinner. The agenda of the European Council meeting focuses on migration and internal security. Specific foreign policy issues ...

As has become the norm with European Council meetings, EU Heads of State or Government will convene on 17 and 18 October 2018 in different formats with varying compositions and levels of formality: a regular meeting of the European Council, and an enlarged Euro Summit of 27 Member States on 18 October, preceded by a European Council (Article 50) meeting on the 17 October over dinner. The agenda of the European Council meeting focuses on migration and internal security. Specific foreign policy issues might also be addressed at this meeting. The Euro Summit will discuss the state of play of negotiations on the deepening of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), with a view to the next Euro Summit in December. However, the priority issue for Heads of State or Government will be Brexit. At the European Council (Article 50) meeting, EU-27 leaders are expected to discuss the progress that has been achieved in the negotiations so far, and possibly call for an extraordinary summit in November 2018.

The European Council in 2017: Overview of decisions and discussions

29-06-2018

The year 2017 was good for the EU, politically and economically. For the first time in almost a decade, the EU was not beset by crises, although Brexit posed a difficult challenge. The European Council met the Brexit challenge by approving guidelines for the negotiations in April, and agreeing to move to a new stage in December, while convening in a new format: Article 50 (TEU) meetings of the EU-27. The European Council launched another new formal in 2017: Leaders’ Meetings, held under the auspices ...

The year 2017 was good for the EU, politically and economically. For the first time in almost a decade, the EU was not beset by crises, although Brexit posed a difficult challenge. The European Council met the Brexit challenge by approving guidelines for the negotiations in April, and agreeing to move to a new stage in December, while convening in a new format: Article 50 (TEU) meetings of the EU-27. The European Council launched another new formal in 2017: Leaders’ Meetings, held under the auspices of the Leader’ Agenda, to discuss challenging issues such as migration and EMU reform. By the end of the year, the European Council could look back at an eventful but largely successful twelve months.

Migration & asylum: Projects & funding

16-05-2018

Funding instruments in the field of migration and asylum management cover, on the one hand, different EU policy fields, such as enlargement, neighbourhood, development cooperation and common foreign and security policy, as well as, on the other, international projects such as those managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) at a more global level. The legal basis of each funding instrument provides for the range of its geographical ...

Funding instruments in the field of migration and asylum management cover, on the one hand, different EU policy fields, such as enlargement, neighbourhood, development cooperation and common foreign and security policy, as well as, on the other, international projects such as those managed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) at a more global level. The legal basis of each funding instrument provides for the range of its geographical and thematic coverage. In addition, interaction takes place between the different areas covered by the thematic and geographic programmes and other external financing Instruments. The funding landscape changed in 2013 with the new Financial Regulation applicable to the EU budget. This enabled the European Commission to create and administer Union Trust Funds in the field of external action, from 2014: these include multi-donor trust funds for emergency, post-emergency or thematic actions such as the Bêkou and the Madad Fund. The European Parliament welcomed this development in an April 2013 resolution, considering that it would allow the EU to raise the visibility of its external action and to have greater control over the delivery chain of such funds. Following the Valletta Summit in November 2015, an Emergency Trust Fund for stability, to address the root causes of irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa was created. To meet the increased migratory challenges, EU funding for the 2015-2018 period has more than doubled. Moreover, the crisis in Syria and in the neighbouring region led to the creation of different funding instruments, by the EU and the international community. EU agencies active externally are also funded through the EU budget. For the 2015-2018 period contributions for support to such EU agencies and their operations reaches €1.4 billion. Funding is one of the main instruments for EU cooperation with third countries in the area of migration, asylum and borders. This paper aims to map and clarify the different funding instruments established for migration-related projects, financed by the EU as well as by the international community.

Recent migration flows to the EU

16-05-2018

This infographic aims to present the latest available data on migrant flows to the EU in the year 2017. It covers the detection of illegal crossings on the EU's external borders, numbers of deaths of migrants on those crossings, the number of asylum applications in EU Member States and their decisions on those applications. Previous editions of this Infographic were issued in September 2015 (PE 565.905), April 2016 (PE 580.893), February 2017 (PE 595.918) and December 2017 (PE 614.604).

This infographic aims to present the latest available data on migrant flows to the EU in the year 2017. It covers the detection of illegal crossings on the EU's external borders, numbers of deaths of migrants on those crossings, the number of asylum applications in EU Member States and their decisions on those applications. Previous editions of this Infographic were issued in September 2015 (PE 565.905), April 2016 (PE 580.893), February 2017 (PE 595.918) and December 2017 (PE 614.604).

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