10

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Oblasť politiky
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EYE event - Sport without corruption

16-05-2018

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

Played and watched by billions of people across the globe, sport embodies specific values, such as fair play and respect for the rules. Corruption scandals such as those that have made headlines in recent years, be it in football or athletics, seriously tarnish its image, shaking public trust.

Towards an integrated approach to sports policy

26-01-2017

Ahead of the upcoming discussions on a new European Union (EU) work plan for sport, an own-initiative report to be presented to Parliament's first February plenary session takes stock of the implementation of EU sports policy to date, and formulates recommendations on its future course.

Ahead of the upcoming discussions on a new European Union (EU) work plan for sport, an own-initiative report to be presented to Parliament's first February plenary session takes stock of the implementation of EU sports policy to date, and formulates recommendations on its future course.

Good governance in sport

23-01-2017

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance ...

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance their governance standards, independent reports suggest that much remains to be done. The European Union’s action for good governance in sport, mainly taking the form of recommendations and financial support for specific initiatives, has delivered some concrete outcomes, including the development of a set of principles applicable to organisations across the whole sport movement. A pledge to implement good governance in European sport, to which 32 federations and organisations have committed so far, was launched during the September 2016 European week of sport. The European Parliament is actively working on the topic of good governance, one of the three pillars of its ongoing own-initiative report on ‘An integrated approach to sport policy’. The text is due to be presented to Parliament’s first February plenary session, ahead of the drafting of the next EU work plan for sport for the 2017-2020 period, to be negotiated under the Maltese Presidency of the Council. A trend towards cooperative approaches to good governance in sport can be seen, including examples such as the future 'international sport integrity partnership'.

Integrity and Good Governance in Sport

21-12-2015

The author describes his progress from sports enthusiast to sceptic following repeated experiences, as a journalist, of frauds in high-level sports including athletics and swimming but especially cycling. These frauds involved performance-enhancing drugs and medical procedures and Walsh took the lead in exposing Lance Armstrong as a key beneficiary. The importance of asking the ‘obvious question’ to get to the truth is emphasised. Walsh stresses the role played by elected representatives and governments ...

The author describes his progress from sports enthusiast to sceptic following repeated experiences, as a journalist, of frauds in high-level sports including athletics and swimming but especially cycling. These frauds involved performance-enhancing drugs and medical procedures and Walsh took the lead in exposing Lance Armstrong as a key beneficiary. The importance of asking the ‘obvious question’ to get to the truth is emphasised. Walsh stresses the role played by elected representatives and governments in a world where the governing bodies of sports have often proven inadequate to the task of maintaining fair play and good governance. In the case of cycling, and FIFA in football, it was government that initiated definitive action against fraud. Walsh argues that the nominees of governments to the presidency of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) are the most effective. Walsh hopes, but is not optimistic, that a WADA investigation of doping will lead to the suspension from Olympic competition of any guilty national athletics federations, not just individual athletes. He further argues that doping in sport is a very high value fraud that governments should make a criminal offence. Finally, Walsh explains that he remains an enthusiast for sport – his scepticism is reserved for elite sports and the focus on hosting high profile events and increasing national medal tallies. He feels that this elite focus does not lead to any improvement in sport participation – even the contrary – and that getting people active should be the political priority, especially young people and those in sociallydeprived areas where participation is lowest.

Externý autor

David Walsh

Widespread doping in athletics

17-11-2015

On 9 November 2015, the Independent Commission set up by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) released the findings of a near year-long investigation into allegations of extensive doping use and cover-up within Russian athletics.

On 9 November 2015, the Independent Commission set up by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) released the findings of a near year-long investigation into allegations of extensive doping use and cover-up within Russian athletics.

EU sport policy: An overview

03-09-2015

Sport is a field in which the EU's responsibilities are new. The Lisbon Treaty, which entered into force in December 2009, grants the Union a supporting competence, meaning that legally binding measures are excluded. EU scope for intervention is further limited by the need to take the specific nature of sport into account and to respect the autonomy of sport organisations, which are traditionally in charge of regulating and organising their sport. In policy-making, the EU thus relies on soft power ...

Sport is a field in which the EU's responsibilities are new. The Lisbon Treaty, which entered into force in December 2009, grants the Union a supporting competence, meaning that legally binding measures are excluded. EU scope for intervention is further limited by the need to take the specific nature of sport into account and to respect the autonomy of sport organisations, which are traditionally in charge of regulating and organising their sport. In policy-making, the EU thus relies on soft power, i.e. on dialogue and cooperation, as well as incentive measures, taking the form of financial support for projects and networks. If one had to sum up the EU approach in one word, 'guidance' would probably be the most appropriate. Concrete achievements so far include mainly policy recommendations and guiding principles addressed to Member States and sport stakeholders. In the international context, where the Council of Europe, long active in the field of sport, already plays a prominent role, the EU seeks to strengthen unity and foster convergence between its Member States, with a view to arriving at coordinated positions on transnational issues, including the fight against doping and match-fixing.

The Lisbon Treaty and EU Sports Policy

28-09-2010

A study providing a panorama of the possibilities of EU sports policy at a time when these are being reviewed after the approval of the Lisbon Treaty. In particular, the study assesses from a legal point of view, the potential of the new TFEU to enable the EU to attain the objectives of greater fairness and openness in sporting competitions and greater protection of the moral and physical integrity of sports practitioners whilst taking account of the specific nature of sport.

A study providing a panorama of the possibilities of EU sports policy at a time when these are being reviewed after the approval of the Lisbon Treaty. In particular, the study assesses from a legal point of view, the potential of the new TFEU to enable the EU to attain the objectives of greater fairness and openness in sporting competitions and greater protection of the moral and physical integrity of sports practitioners whilst taking account of the specific nature of sport.

Externý autor

Prof. Dr. Richard Parrish (Edge Hill University, United Kingdom) ; Dr. Borja García García (Loughborough University, United Kingdom) ; Samuli Miettinen (Edge Hill University) ; Prof. Dr. Robert Siekmann (T.M.C. Asser Institute, The Netherlands) (project manager)

The EU and sport

18-02-2010

Sport is very popular among EU citizens, not only as an activity, but also as entertainment. However, the growing commercialisation of sport has challenged its social, educational and cultural dimensions. Until 1st December 2009, sport was not mentioned in the Treaties. The Community's involvement in sport has thus been based on existing policies (e.g. audiovisual or health). Moreover, the case law of the Court of Justice (e.g. Bosman) has played a major role in clarifying the impact on sport of ...

Sport is very popular among EU citizens, not only as an activity, but also as entertainment. However, the growing commercialisation of sport has challenged its social, educational and cultural dimensions. Until 1st December 2009, sport was not mentioned in the Treaties. The Community's involvement in sport has thus been based on existing policies (e.g. audiovisual or health). Moreover, the case law of the Court of Justice (e.g. Bosman) has played a major role in clarifying the impact on sport of the provisions on both the free movement of workers and on competition. The Lisbon Treaty gives explicit powers to the EU to carry out actions to support, coordinate or supplement the actions of the Member States in the field of sport.

Doping v profesionálnom športe

26-06-2008

Externý autor

Christophe Brissonneau, CERSES UMR 8137 CNRS, Université Paris Descartes.

The European Union and Sport

15-06-2004

More than one third of Europe's citizens participate in sporting activities and many aspects of the Union's policies influence the sporting world in areas such as free movement of persons, competition policy, media policy and health policy. However, it was only after 1997, with the inclusion of a Declaration on Sport in the Amsterdam Treaty that the European Union started to deal with sport from angles which were not purely economic. The briefing deals with these topics in detail.

More than one third of Europe's citizens participate in sporting activities and many aspects of the Union's policies influence the sporting world in areas such as free movement of persons, competition policy, media policy and health policy. However, it was only after 1997, with the inclusion of a Declaration on Sport in the Amsterdam Treaty that the European Union started to deal with sport from angles which were not purely economic. The briefing deals with these topics in detail.

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