744

výsledok(-ky)

Slovo (slová)
Typ publikácie
Autor
Kľúčové slovo
Dátum

Rail passengers' rights and obligations in the EU

09-04-2021

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September ...

In 2007, the EU established a set of basic rights for rail passengers, which became applicable at the end of 2009. These rights provide for all passengers, including those with reduced mobility, a harmonised minimum level of protection, information and assistance. Reports have concluded that the implementation of these rights, although relatively smooth, is not done uniformly across the EU. Moreover, other shortcomings have prevented these rights from being used to their full potential. In September 2017, the European Commission presented a new proposal to address these issues and to strike a new balance between keeping rail operators competitive and providing adequate passenger protection. The European Parliament adopted its first-reading position on this proposal on 15 November 2018. For its part, the Council adopted its general approach on 2 December 2019, under the Finnish Presidency. Interinstitutional negotiations began at the end of January 2020, and on 1 October 2020, under the Germany Presidency, Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the text. On 16 March 2021, the European Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism voted in favour of the agreed text as adopted by the Council. After more than three years of debate, the Parliament is expected to vote at second reading on this rather controversial proposal during its April 2021 plenary session.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

06-04-2021

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater ...

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater focus on aquaculture is reflected in its inclusion in the name of the fund. A thorny issue in the negotiations was support for investment in fishing vessels, on which the co legislators wanted to go beyond the proposal. The compromise allows aid for vessels up to 24 metres long: support for the first acquisition of a vessel by a young fisherman, the replacement or modernisation of engines, and operations that improve safety, working conditions or energy efficiency. The measures come with restrictive conditions, such as the respect of fishing capacity ceilings. At least 15 % of Member States' allocations should be spent on control and data collection. The agreed text was endorsed by the Committee on Fisheries on 22 February 2021. After adoption by the Council, Parliament is expected to adopt the text and complete the procedure at second reading.

InvestEU programme: The EU's new investment support scheme

30-03-2021

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's ...

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's insistence, European Investment Bank legacy portfolios will be consolidated with InvestEU, which could mobilise an extra €35-40 billion in investment. Under the national compartment, Member States are able to allocate amounts to InvestEU from funds under shared management and from the new Recovery and Resilience Facility. Composed of four policy windows (sustainable infrastructure; research, innovation and digitalisation; SMEs; and social investment and skills), InvestEU is designed to contribute to the green transition in various ways, including through investment targets and a horizontal Just Transition Scheme.

Review of EU Enforcement Regulation for trade disputes

19-03-2021

On 12 December 2019, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend Regulation (EU) No 654/2014 concerning the exercise of the EU's rights for the application and enforcement of international trade rules ('the Enforcement Regulation') of 15 May 2014. The Enforcement Regulation enables the EU to suspend or withdraw concessions or other obligations under international trade agreements in order to respond to breaches by third countries of international trade rules that affect the EU's commercial ...

On 12 December 2019, the European Commission adopted a proposal to amend Regulation (EU) No 654/2014 concerning the exercise of the EU's rights for the application and enforcement of international trade rules ('the Enforcement Regulation') of 15 May 2014. The Enforcement Regulation enables the EU to suspend or withdraw concessions or other obligations under international trade agreements in order to respond to breaches by third countries of international trade rules that affect the EU's commercial interests. The proposed amendments were aimed at empowering the EU to impose counter-measures in situations where EU trade partners violate international trade rules and block the dispute settlement procedures included in multilateral, regional and bilateral trade agreements, thus preventing the EU from obtaining final binding rulings in its favour. - The Council adopted its negotiating position on 8 April 2020, and the Committee on International Trade (INTA) of the European Parliament adopted its position on 6 July 2020. Trilogue negotiations concluded on 28 October with a provisional agreement, which INTA endorsed on 10 November. Parliament adopted the agreed text on 19 January 2021. Following the Council's approval, the Regulation as amended entered into force on 13 February 2021. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Revision of the Eurovignette Directive

11-03-2021

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The proposal was presented within the context of the Commission's 'Europe on the move' package that sought to modernise mobility and transport and included several legislative proposals. The objective of the Eurovignette proposal, which would substantially amend the existing legislation ...

The Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a directive amending Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (known as the Eurovignette Directive) in May 2017. The proposal was presented within the context of the Commission's 'Europe on the move' package that sought to modernise mobility and transport and included several legislative proposals. The objective of the Eurovignette proposal, which would substantially amend the existing legislation by extending the scope of vehicles covered, is to make progress in the application of the 'polluter pays' and 'user pays' principles. The Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) of the European Parliament, in charge of the file, adopted its report on 24 May 2018 and the Parliament adopted its first-reading position on 25 October 2018. After the 2019 European elections, the TRAN committee voted in favour of opening negotiations with the Council. The Council, on its side, started discussions on the proposal at the end of 2017 and after a standstill of one year, resumed them in 2019. After several compromise proposals and improvements by the Croatian and German Presidencies, the Council approved its negotiating mandate on the proposal on 18 December 2020. Interinstitutional negotiations began at the end of January 2021 and are expected to be complicated.

Recasting the Return Directive

11-03-2021

The Return Directive is the main piece of EU (European Union) legislation governing the procedures and criteria to be applied by Member States when returning irregularly staying third-country nationals, and a cornerstone of EU return policy. Taking into account the decrease in the EU return rate (from 45.8 % in 2016 to 28.9 % in 2019) and following European Council and Council calls to review the 2008 legal text to enhance the effectiveness of EU return policy, in September 2018 the Commission proposed ...

The Return Directive is the main piece of EU (European Union) legislation governing the procedures and criteria to be applied by Member States when returning irregularly staying third-country nationals, and a cornerstone of EU return policy. Taking into account the decrease in the EU return rate (from 45.8 % in 2016 to 28.9 % in 2019) and following European Council and Council calls to review the 2008 legal text to enhance the effectiveness of EU return policy, in September 2018 the Commission proposed a targeted recast of the directive aiming to 'reduce the length of return procedures, secure a better link between asylum and return procedures, and ensure a more effective use of measures to prevent absconding'. In the 2014-2019 parliamentary term, whereas the Council reached a partial general approach on the proposal, the European Parliament did not reach a position. A draft report was presented to the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) but was not adopted. After the 2019 elections, Parliament decided to resume work on the proposal. A new draft report was published on 21 February 2020, but it was not presented in the LIBE committee until 10 September 2020 on account of delays caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. The deadline for tabling amendments expired on 23 September 2020 and the LIBE committee is currently considering the 754 amendments tabled. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Online platforms: Economic and societal effects

10-03-2021

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered ...

Online platforms such as Google, Amazon, and Facebook play an increasingly central role in the economy and society. They operate as digital intermediaries across interconnected sectors and markets subject to network effects. These firms have grown to an unprecedented scale, propelled by data-driven business models. Online platforms have a massive impact on individual users and businesses, and are recasting the relationships between customers, advertisers, workers, and employers. This has triggered a public debate on online platforms’ economic dominance and patterns of pervasive data collection. The report provides evidence of positive impact, and documents a set of important issues not fully addressed by existing European regulation and enforcement. The consensus is that there is a need to strengthen the current law enforcement and regulation of the platform economy. This report welcomes the proposed Digital Markets and Digital Services Acts, and offers a series of policy options for competition and innovation, working conditions and labour markets, consumer and societal risks, and environmental sustainability.

Externý autor

DG, EPRS_This study has been written by Professor Annabelle Gawer, Surrey Business School, University of Surrey (main author), Dr Nick Srnicek, King's College London, at the request of the Panel for the Future of Science and Technology (STOA) and managed by the Scientific Foresight Unit, within the Directorate-General for Parliamentary Research Services (EPRS) of the Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Common procedure for asylum

08-03-2021

As part of the common European asylum system (CEAS), the Asylum Procedures Directive sets out procedures for Member States for granting and withdrawing international protection in accordance with the Qualification Directive. Following the large influx of asylum-seekers to the European Union after 2014, the directive came under criticism for being too complex and for leaving Member States too broad discretion, leading to differences in treatment and outcomes. On 13 July 2016, as part of the reform ...

As part of the common European asylum system (CEAS), the Asylum Procedures Directive sets out procedures for Member States for granting and withdrawing international protection in accordance with the Qualification Directive. Following the large influx of asylum-seekers to the European Union after 2014, the directive came under criticism for being too complex and for leaving Member States too broad discretion, leading to differences in treatment and outcomes. On 13 July 2016, as part of the reform of the CEAS, the Commission published a proposal to replace the current directive with a regulation establishing a common procedure for international protection applicable in all participating Member States. The choice of a directly applicable regulation is expected to bring about harmonisation of the procedures, ensuring same steps, timeframes and safeguards across the EU. The 2016 proposal having reached deadlock, the Commission proposed an amended regulation on 23 September 2020 under its new pact on asylum and migration, suggesting targeted amendments to help overcome certain contentious issues relating in particular to the border procedure and return. The amended proposal is currently being examined by the co-legislators with a view to fixing their positions in order to resume trilogue negotiations shortly. Fourth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Recovery and Resilience Facility

08-03-2021

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, on 28 May 2020 the Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing a Recovery and Resilience Facility (the Facility). The Facility will provide €672.5 billion in loans and grants over the coming years to help mitigate the consequences of the pandemic across the EU and to make EU economies more sustainable. The Facility will disburse funds based on the achievement of a set of milestones and targets. ...

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, on 28 May 2020 the Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing a Recovery and Resilience Facility (the Facility). The Facility will provide €672.5 billion in loans and grants over the coming years to help mitigate the consequences of the pandemic across the EU and to make EU economies more sustainable. The Facility will disburse funds based on the achievement of a set of milestones and targets. The Parliament's Committees on Budgets and on Economic and Monetary Affairs have been working jointly on the file, and adopted their report in November 2020. In December 2020, the Parliament and the Council reached an agreement on the Facility in trilogue. The Parliament approved the agreed text at first reading on 9 February 2021. The act was then formally adopted by the Council, and published in Official Journal on 18 February 2021, entering into force the following day.

Revising the fisheries control system

04-03-2021

During the March I part-session, Parliament is expected to vote on the European Commission's proposal to revise the fisheries control system, centred on the amendment of the Control Regulation 1224/2009. The Committee on Fisheries has adopted a report that supports the proposal on major aspects, such as tracking of all EU fishing vessels, reporting of all catches, monitoring of recreational fisheries and improving traceability along the supply chain for all fishery and aquaculture products, whether ...

During the March I part-session, Parliament is expected to vote on the European Commission's proposal to revise the fisheries control system, centred on the amendment of the Control Regulation 1224/2009. The Committee on Fisheries has adopted a report that supports the proposal on major aspects, such as tracking of all EU fishing vessels, reporting of all catches, monitoring of recreational fisheries and improving traceability along the supply chain for all fishery and aquaculture products, whether from EU fisheries or imported. The report also backs the proposal on harmonising sanctions for infringements of fisheries rules across the EU, and requires the creation of a 'Union register' of infringements centralising Member States' information. In the same line of harmonised control, the report introduces uniform formats throughout the EU for a wide range of documents. The PECH report departs from the proposal as regards the mandatory use of on-board CCTV cameras to control the landing obligation, only allowing it on a voluntary basis (if associated with incentives such as quota increases), or as an accompanying sanction for vessels that commit repeated infringements. The report amends the proposal to exempt vessels under 10 m in length from the obligation to keep electronic logbooks, and to introduce derogations to the weighing of fishery products upon landing. It increases the margin of tolerance in estimates recorded in the fishing logbook, in particular for small pelagic and tuna species. It also limits the continuous monitoring of the engine power to vessels exceeding 221 kilowatts that operate under fishing effort regimes.

Nadchádzajúce podujatia

13-04-2021
Decarbonisation of the energy system
Vypočutie -
ITRE
13-04-2021
AFCO Public Hearing on the Reform of European Electoral Law - 13 April 2021
Vypočutie -
AFCO
13-04-2021
Hearing on "Interference through advertisement"
Vypočutie -
INGE IMCO

Partneri