331

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Oblasť politiky
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EU sports policy: Going faster, aiming higher, reaching further

20-09-2019

Sport has a growing impact both on the European Union (EU) economy and on society as a whole. Over 7 million people work in sport-related jobs, and sport-related goods and services amount to nearly 3 % of total EU gross value added. It was not until 2009, with the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, that the Union received a clear mandate to build up and implement an EU-coordinated sports policy supported by a specific budget, and to develop cooperation with international bodies in the area of ...

Sport has a growing impact both on the European Union (EU) economy and on society as a whole. Over 7 million people work in sport-related jobs, and sport-related goods and services amount to nearly 3 % of total EU gross value added. It was not until 2009, with the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, that the Union received a clear mandate to build up and implement an EU-coordinated sports policy supported by a specific budget, and to develop cooperation with international bodies in the area of sport. However, EU competence in sport is limited and only allows the EU to support, coordinate or complement sports policy measures taken by national governments. This rules out the adoption of legislation or any other legally binding measure. The EU has therefore opted to act via 'soft' policy tools, such as guidelines, recommendations and – most importantly – funding, to support its sport-related objectives. Over the years, the EU has been actively involved in tackling transnational issues such as doping, match-fixing and lack of physical activity. In recent years, various health-related EU initiatives have grown increasingly popular. In 2018, the European Week of Sport attracted nearly 14 million people to over 50 000 events across Europe, with the Western Balkans and the countries from the Eastern Partnership joining the initiative in 2019. The #BeActive Night, a new feature first introduced in 2018, will continue encouraging participants to discover and try the different sports activities available in their area. None of this would have been possible without the introduction of a specific budget for sport, in which the European Parliament played a key role. As the popularity of sport-related initiatives grows, so do the Commission's plans and ambitions for the broader role of sport in society. The executive's proposal for the 2021-2027 Erasmus programme confirms this ambition. Accordingly, the amount available for Erasmus would be doubled, to reach €30 billion, with €550 million dedicated to sport.

Preventing violence at football matches

05-09-2019

Did you know that 120 million people attended more than 16 000 football matches across Europe in 2016, with incidents taking place in 93% of them? Check out our infographic for more interesting facts.

Did you know that 120 million people attended more than 16 000 football matches across Europe in 2016, with incidents taking place in 93% of them? Check out our infographic for more interesting facts.

Research for CULT Committee - Culture and creative sectors in the European Union – Key future developments, challenges and opportunities

28-08-2019

Culture and creative sectors (CCS) are confronted with an ever-changing environment which challenges practices, business models and market balances. This study highlights the key trends that are likely to impact the future development of the CCS in their operational context in the European Union by 2030.

Culture and creative sectors (CCS) are confronted with an ever-changing environment which challenges practices, business models and market balances. This study highlights the key trends that are likely to impact the future development of the CCS in their operational context in the European Union by 2030.

Externý autor

KEA European Affairs: Clémentine Daubeuf, Arthur Le Gall, Teodora Pletosu, Marianthi Kopellou ; PPMI: Donatas Pocius, Olha Koshchiyenko, Rasa Goštautaitė

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Promoting European culture

28-06-2019

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural ...

The concept of cultural diversity lies at the heart of the European project. Recent years have seen renewed interest in the sector's potential for promoting social cohesion, unity and tolerance, on the one hand, with continued recognition of its valuable economic role, on the other. There is a strong commitment at the EU level to ensure that culture is mainstreamed in all policy areas, with a special focus on the protection of cultural heritage and cultural diversity, which are key elements in cultural identity and expression. From the economic point of view, the cultural and creative sector, which employs 8.4 million people in the European Union, is dynamic and has a large potential for growth due to its diversity and scope for individual creative freedom. Yet the development of this potential is hampered by barriers, notably linguistic diversity, fragmentation and different financial mechanisms across the EU. The EU's cultural and creative industry also faces challenge from digital technologies and global competition, particularly from the United States' (US) audiovisual industry, and from US and Chinese diplomatic efforts to promote their cultural output. Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the EU's role in the context of cultural policy is a supportive and complementary one, direct responsibility in the area being largely a matter for the individual Member States. Nevertheless, since 2014, these challenges have been addressed at the EU level, inter alia via the strengthening of the digital single market, which is essential for access to culture, the circulation of European cultural works, the fair remuneration of creators and fair competition. Since the economic crisis, additional funding has also been made available for the sector via the European Fund for Strategic Investment introduced by the Juncker Commission in 2015. As indicated in a 2017 European Commission communication on the role of culture and education, the synergies between the socio-economic aspects are to be enhanced. The European Year of Cultural Heritage in 2018 is to feed into a reflection and actions related to shared culture and history. These issues are addressed in the New European Agenda for Culture, while the new multiannual financial framework for 2021-2027 envisages increased funding for culture. This will also support efforts to combine artistic and technological skills, which are a prerequisite for artistic expression in the new digital environment. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Youth empowerment

28-06-2019

The proportion of young people (15-29 years old) in the general EU population is declining. On the whole, young people have a higher level of education than older adults, and youth unemployment rates have begun to decrease. Nevertheless, young people are still more exposed to poverty and social exclusion than other sections of the population. They are less prone to put their health at risk than previous generations. For instance, fewer young people smoke, get drunk, or become involved in a road accident ...

The proportion of young people (15-29 years old) in the general EU population is declining. On the whole, young people have a higher level of education than older adults, and youth unemployment rates have begun to decrease. Nevertheless, young people are still more exposed to poverty and social exclusion than other sections of the population. They are less prone to put their health at risk than previous generations. For instance, fewer young people smoke, get drunk, or become involved in a road accident than previously, but young people are still over-represented among those who are injured in road accidents. Obesity due to bad eating habits and lack of physical exercise is still an issue. Young people are also less likely to vote, or stand for election than older adults, but in recent years there has been a slight increase in interest in politics, political action and volunteering. Almost 80 % of young Europeans identify themselves as European citizens. In a Eurobarometer survey published in 2018 they placed education, skills and the environment at the top of a list of priorities for the EU. The European Union is engaged in helping Member States address young people's needs and aspirations through a youth strategy which covers areas such as employment, entrepreneurship, social inclusion, participation, education, training, health, wellbeing, voluntary activities, the global dimension, creativity and culture. The strategy is backed by a number of funding programmes that are specifically focused on young people, most notably the Youth Employment Initiative, Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps. It also draws from funds directed at other specific policy areas. EU action in the area of youth empowerment is best known for the mobility opportunities it has created, in particular through Erasmus. Future challenges include reaching a wider spectrum of young people, especially those from disadvantaged and hard-to-reach groups, making the results of the consultative process, known as youth dialogue, more tangible, and improving synergies between policy areas for greater effectiveness. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Study in focus: Employment barriers in border regions

15-05-2019

The note summarises key results from a study prepared at reqest of the Employment and Social Affairs Committee. It concludes with a set of policy recommendations including the design of EU funding post-2020.

The note summarises key results from a study prepared at reqest of the Employment and Social Affairs Committee. It concludes with a set of policy recommendations including the design of EU funding post-2020.

Technology and the arts: Past, present and future synergies

03-05-2019

From the first canvas paintings to the production of musical instruments and contemporary cinema, art as we know it would be simply impossible without resource to humanity’s historical cache of technology development. The reverse of this relationship is also important, with the arts creating driving innovation and generating substantial demand for technology products. In the course of their work, artists often develop new techniques and push the boundaries of the imagination in ways that can provoke ...

From the first canvas paintings to the production of musical instruments and contemporary cinema, art as we know it would be simply impossible without resource to humanity’s historical cache of technology development. The reverse of this relationship is also important, with the arts creating driving innovation and generating substantial demand for technology products. In the course of their work, artists often develop new techniques and push the boundaries of the imagination in ways that can provoke new directions in technology development.

The historical relationship between artistic activities and technology development

03-05-2019

Understanding the past of art and technology can help us to navigate the present and future. Technology and art have always been linked, and are now more intertwined than ever before. Technology and humanity create and shape each other in profound ways. People are not distinct from the technologies they are surrounded by and use – they are also defined and shaped by them. The present study contributes to our understanding of the cyclic nature of the intertwining of technology and art, focussing on ...

Understanding the past of art and technology can help us to navigate the present and future. Technology and art have always been linked, and are now more intertwined than ever before. Technology and humanity create and shape each other in profound ways. People are not distinct from the technologies they are surrounded by and use – they are also defined and shaped by them. The present study contributes to our understanding of the cyclic nature of the intertwining of technology and art, focussing on pre-digital eras

Externý autor

DG, EPRS

The relationship between artistic activities and digital technology development

03-05-2019

This report examines how digital technology change is affecting artistic activity and how artistic activity is affecting digital technology. Artistic activity is broadly defined to include design, film, computer games, architecture, music and fashion as well as art. The focus is on digital technology’s role in creative activity. The study examines global trends with a particular focus on the European Union (EU). It describes likely future trends and sets out policy options to encourage activity at ...

This report examines how digital technology change is affecting artistic activity and how artistic activity is affecting digital technology. Artistic activity is broadly defined to include design, film, computer games, architecture, music and fashion as well as art. The focus is on digital technology’s role in creative activity. The study examines global trends with a particular focus on the European Union (EU). It describes likely future trends and sets out policy options to encourage activity at the intersection of artistic and technological skills.

Externý autor

DG, EPRS

Policy Departments' Monthly Highlights - April 2019

15-04-2019

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

The Monthly Highlights publication provides an overview, at a glance, of the on-going work of the policy departments, including a selection of the latest and forthcoming publications, and a list of future events.

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