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Genome editing is the targeted alteration of a few DNA letters within the existing genetic blueprint of an organism. By far the most widely used genome-editing tool is CRISPR-Cas. CRISPR-Cas genome-editing technology can be applied in a number of different ways. The genetic changes that are introduced by means of the SDN1 and SDN2 types of CRISPR-Cas technology do not differ from changes that can occur naturally or result from conventional breeding. While CRISPR-Cas technology is highly accurate, ...

Xenotransplantation, defined as the transplantation of animal derived organs and cells into humans, is currently a very active focus of research as it overrides some of the obstacles encountered with tissue engineering, such as vascularization and innervation. The resurgence of interest in xenotransplantation is mainly attributed to the improvement of gene editing techniques (such as CRISPR/Cas9), since genetically engineered animals have been generated to overcome organ rejection. However, xenotransplantation ...

On 29 April 2021, the European Commission presented a study on the status of new genomic techniques (NGTs) under EU law. The Council had asked for this study in the context of a 2018 European Court of Justice judgment and the practical questions raised by it. The Commission study examines the implementation of EU legislation on NGTs, based on consultations with the Member States and stakeholders. It provides information on the status and use of NGTs in plants, animals and micro-organisms for agri-food ...

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. Consumers could benefit from enhanced nutritional quality or reduced allergenicity of food, for example, such as gluten-reduced wheat. There is, however, considerable debate ...

New plant genetic modification techniques, referred to as 'gene editing' or 'genome editing', have evolved rapidly in recent years, allowing much faster and more precise results than conventional plant-breeding techniques. They are seen as a promising innovative field for the agri-food industry, offering great technical potential. There is, however, considerable debate as to how these new techniques should be regulated, and whether some or all of them should fall within the scope of EU legislation ...

‘Gene drives’ are best known for their capacity to suppress malaria by eradicating mosquito populations. However, its applications reach even further, including the potential to eliminate other insect-transmitted diseases, erasing herbicide and pesticide resistance in weeds and pests, and removing invasive species from ecosystems. How do we navigate the potential benefits and significant risks that are involved in gene drive use?

Varnost hrane

Kratki vodnik po EU 01-06-2017

Cilji evropske politike za varnost hrane vsebujejo dva vidika: zaščititi zdravje ljudi in interese potrošnikov ter spodbujati nemoteno delovanje enotnega evropskega trga. Evropska unija tako zagotavlja, da se na področjih higiene krme in živil, zdravja živali, zdravstvenega varstva rastlin in preprečevanja kontaminacije živilskih izdelkov s snovmi iz okolice vzpostavijo in spoštujejo standardi glede nadzora. EU sprejema tudi predpise za označevanje živil in krme.

Synthetic biology and biodiversity

Na kratko 01-12-2016

Synthetic biology is a new dimension of modern biotechnology with the potential to design and manufacture living organisms, components and products. It will be on the agenda of the 13th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), to be held from 4 to 17 December 2016, in Cancún, Mexico. Synthetic biology could provide novel solutions for environmental and biodiversity-related issues, but could also have an adverse impact on the natural ...

In April 2015 the European Commission put forward a proposal that would allow the Member States to 'opt out' from using genetically modified (GM) crops authorised to be imported to the EU for food and feed purposes. The proposal has faced fierce opposition from different stakeholders, as well as Members of the European Parliament, with both the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (ENVI) and the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (AGRI) voting to reject the proposal ...

All genetically modified organisms (GMOs) need authorisation before they can be placed on the EU market. However, a qualified majority among the Member States has never been reached either in favour of or against any authorisation proposal put forward by the Commission. The Commission has therefore concluded that the legal framework for decision-making on genetically modified (GM) food and feed needs to be adapted, and proposes to extend to GM food and feed the solution agreed by the European Parliament ...