17

rezultati

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Vrsta publikacije
Politično področje
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Datum

The right to disconnect

13-01-2021

In the context of the digital transformation in the world of work, the European Parliament's Employment and Social Affairs Committee has adopted a legislative-initiative report calling on the Commission to propose an EU directive that lays down minimum requirements for the right to disconnect. The practice of remote working through digital tools intensified through the coronavirus lockdown measures has drawn increasing attention to the issues of constant connectivity and the blurring boundaries between ...

In the context of the digital transformation in the world of work, the European Parliament's Employment and Social Affairs Committee has adopted a legislative-initiative report calling on the Commission to propose an EU directive that lays down minimum requirements for the right to disconnect. The practice of remote working through digital tools intensified through the coronavirus lockdown measures has drawn increasing attention to the issues of constant connectivity and the blurring boundaries between working and non-working time. Parliament is expected to vote on this legislative initiative during its January 2021 plenary session.

The right to disconnect

09-07-2020

The right to disconnect refers to the right of a worker to be able to disconnect from work-related electronic communications during non-work hours and during holidays.

The right to disconnect refers to the right of a worker to be able to disconnect from work-related electronic communications during non-work hours and during holidays.

Road transport: Driving, breaks, rest times and tachographs

07-07-2020

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the present proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation ...

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the present proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation between Member States and authorities. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted its report. After further debate and procedural developments, Parliament adopted its first-reading position on 4 April 2019. The Council, on its side, reached a general approach on the proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. After four negotiating rounds, the Council and Parliament reached a provisional agreement on the proposal on 12 December 2019, which was approved by Coreper on 20 December. The Council formally adopted its first-reading position on 7 April 2020, and on 8 June the TRAN committee recommended approving it at second reading. The agreed text thus now returns to plenary for a vote at second reading in July. If adopted, this would put an end to three years of debate on a complex and controversial proposal. Sixth edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The Social Protection of Workers in the Platform Economy

07-12-2017

This study investigates the social protection of workers in the platform economy at the request of the European Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee. The report reviews literature and previous research on the platform economy with the aims of defining it and developing a typology for understanding its nature. It discusses the growth and drivers of the platform economy, as well as benefits and challenges for workers, reporting findings from 50 interviews conducted with expert stakeholders ...

This study investigates the social protection of workers in the platform economy at the request of the European Parliament’s Employment and Social Affairs Committee. The report reviews literature and previous research on the platform economy with the aims of defining it and developing a typology for understanding its nature. It discusses the growth and drivers of the platform economy, as well as benefits and challenges for workers, reporting findings from 50 interviews conducted with expert stakeholders in eight European countries and from an original survey of 1,200 platform workers. It dissects the different normative layers that need to be considered when looking at the challenges of social protection of platform workers from a legal perspective. Finally, the report draws conclusions and makes recommendations concerning arrangements for the provision of social protection for workers in this growing sector of the economy.

Zunanji avtor

Chris FORDE, Mark STUART, Simon JOYCE, Liz OLIVER, Danat VALIZADE, Gabriella ALBERTI, Kate HARDY, Vera TRAPPMANN, Charles UMNEY, Calum CARSON, Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change (CERIC), University of Leeds, UK; Justyna KATJA, Gabriela YORDANOVA

Temporary contracts, precarious employment, employees’ fundamental rights and EU employment law

15-11-2017

This study, commissioned by the the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Petitions, was prepared to assess the nature and extent of employment precariousness in the framework of EU’s fundamental rights and EU employment law. The analysis focuses on two broad areas, namely atypical forms of employment and franchising. The report identifies a number of ‘protective gaps’ at various levels of regulation and puts forward ...

This study, commissioned by the the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the Committee on Petitions, was prepared to assess the nature and extent of employment precariousness in the framework of EU’s fundamental rights and EU employment law. The analysis focuses on two broad areas, namely atypical forms of employment and franchising. The report identifies a number of ‘protective gaps’ at various levels of regulation and puts forward policy recommendations that are informed by the need to adopt holistic and comprehensive action for addressing what emerges as a constantly moving target.

Zunanji avtor

Aristea KOUKIADAKI, Senior Lecturer in Employment Law, Work and Equalities Institute, University of Manchester, UK Ioannis KATSAROUMPAS, Lecturer in Employment Law, University of Sussex, UK

Pomorski promet: strateški pristop

01-06-2017

Predpisi EU o pomorskem prometu so osredotočeni zlasti na uporabo načela prostega pretoka storitev ter pravilno uporabo pravil o konkurenci ob hkratnem zagotavljanju visoke ravni varnosti, dobrih delovnih pogojev in okoljskih standardov.

Predpisi EU o pomorskem prometu so osredotočeni zlasti na uporabo načela prostega pretoka storitev ter pravilno uporabo pravil o konkurenci ob hkratnem zagotavljanju visoke ravni varnosti, dobrih delovnih pogojev in okoljskih standardov.

Socialni dialog

01-06-2017

Socialni dialog je bistven element evropskega socialnega modela, ki je bil z amsterdamsko reformo v celoti priznan v Pogodbi. Socialnim partnerjem (predstavniki delodajalcev in delojemalcev) je tako omogočeno, da dejavno prispevajo k oblikovanju evropske socialne politike.

Socialni dialog je bistven element evropskega socialnega modela, ki je bil z amsterdamsko reformo v celoti priznan v Pogodbi. Socialnim partnerjem (predstavniki delodajalcev in delojemalcev) je tako omogočeno, da dejavno prispevajo k oblikovanju evropske socialne politike.

Enhancement of social legislation in road transport II (Working time and enforcement of Regulation 561/2006)

15-05-2017

Directives 2002/15 and 2006/22 lay down rules on the working time of professional drivers, breaks, and enforcement of Regulation 561/2006 on the harmonisation of certain social legislation relating to road transport. Various sources show that there are currently several challenges linked with the implementation of social legislation in road transport in the Member States. These challenges include diverging enforcement practice across the various EU Member States, a lack of clarity in the legislation ...

Directives 2002/15 and 2006/22 lay down rules on the working time of professional drivers, breaks, and enforcement of Regulation 561/2006 on the harmonisation of certain social legislation relating to road transport. Various sources show that there are currently several challenges linked with the implementation of social legislation in road transport in the Member States. These challenges include diverging enforcement practice across the various EU Member States, a lack of clarity in the legislation, the broad discretion left to Member States, and various exemptions allowed by the legislation. These challenges are affecting harmonisation in the field of road transport; they have an impact on legal certainty and are hindering the fulfilment of the legislation's objectives. The European Parliament has noted these issues and has called for them to be resolved. Similarly, the European Economic and Social Committee has recommended updating the current legislation, while representatives of various stakeholder groups have called for amendments in this field. Last, but not least, the European Commission itself has expressed its willingness to revise these directives as part of the enhancement of social legislation in road transport. It is expected that the European Commission will submit a proposal in the second quarter of 2017.

Employment and working conditions in EU civil aviation

15-04-2016

Aviation is a strategically important sector of the EU economy, contributing €110 billion directly and €300 billion indirectly to EU GDP, and employing around 1.9 million persons directly. If impacts on other industries such as tourism are taken into account, then it can be said that aviation supports up to 9 million jobs. These jobs are not evenly spread across the EU: three quarters of air transport employment is centred in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands. ...

Aviation is a strategically important sector of the EU economy, contributing €110 billion directly and €300 billion indirectly to EU GDP, and employing around 1.9 million persons directly. If impacts on other industries such as tourism are taken into account, then it can be said that aviation supports up to 9 million jobs. These jobs are not evenly spread across the EU: three quarters of air transport employment is centred in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands. Since the EU liberalised the aviation market in the early 1990s, the industry has gone through notable changes which have also had an impact on employment and working conditions. For instance, outsourcing has increased; some workers have had to operate from airline bases where they do not live; income has become more variable; many have been laid off and those remaining in work have had to increase their productivity. Furthermore, next to full-time permanent contracts, atypical forms of employment such as agency work, self-employment, zero-hour contracts and pay-to-fly schemes have increasingly been used, especially for younger staff and new entrants to the workforce. Persons employed under such schemes often have more precarious working conditions and are generally less likely to be unionised. EU institutions have repeatedly examined working conditions in civil aviation. Some Members of the European Parliament, as well as of the European Economic and Social Committee, have expressed concerns about the use of atypical forms of employment and multiplication of airlines' home bases. Although the aviation strategy that the European Commission published at the end of 2015 deals with working conditions, it did not present any new legislative initiative on this issue.

Differences in Men's and Women's Work, Care and Leisure Time

15-03-2016

The economic crisis has profoundly affected the labour market and private life of men and women. This study examines the interrelation of policies with the ways women and men allocate time to paid work, care and leisure and the gendered outcomes produced in different socio-economic and cultural settings. It shows that policies are powerful tools which contribute to a better work-life balance and transform gender roles in accordance to the targets of EU2020 strategy and EU28 commitment to gender equality ...

The economic crisis has profoundly affected the labour market and private life of men and women. This study examines the interrelation of policies with the ways women and men allocate time to paid work, care and leisure and the gendered outcomes produced in different socio-economic and cultural settings. It shows that policies are powerful tools which contribute to a better work-life balance and transform gender roles in accordance to the targets of EU2020 strategy and EU28 commitment to gender equality.

Zunanji avtor

Konstantina DAVAKI (Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, the UK)

Prihajajoči dogodki

19-05-2021
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