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Addressing the dissemination of terrorist content online

21-04-2021

The European Commission proposed, in 2018, a new regulation aimed at countering the security threat represented by the spread of terrorist content online. The regulation would require service providers to remove online content posted with the objective to radicalise, recruit or incite to violence, within one hour of receiving a removal order from the competent authorities. The European Parliament is due to vote at second reading during its April plenary session on the agreed text reached in trilogue ...

The European Commission proposed, in 2018, a new regulation aimed at countering the security threat represented by the spread of terrorist content online. The regulation would require service providers to remove online content posted with the objective to radicalise, recruit or incite to violence, within one hour of receiving a removal order from the competent authorities. The European Parliament is due to vote at second reading during its April plenary session on the agreed text reached in trilogue negotiations.

Proceedings of the workshop on Use of big data and AI in fighting corruption and misuse of public funds - good practice, ways forward and how to integrate new technology into contemporary control framework

31-03-2021

Notes from the workshop on Use of big data and AI in fighting corruption and misuse of public funds - good practice, ways forward and how to integrate new technology into contemporary control framework. The workshop took place on 23 February 2021.

Notes from the workshop on Use of big data and AI in fighting corruption and misuse of public funds - good practice, ways forward and how to integrate new technology into contemporary control framework. The workshop took place on 23 February 2021.

Anti Money Laundering Package 2021

29-03-2021

Over the past three decades, the European Union has constantly improved its framework to fight money laundering and terrorist financing. Despite the constant improvements, the existing framework still suffers from some shortcomings. In 2020, the European Commission therefore presented an action plan for a new single EU anti-money laundering system, outlining areas for future proposals that the European Commission will present in a package in spring 2021. The main areas for this 2021 package will ...

Over the past three decades, the European Union has constantly improved its framework to fight money laundering and terrorist financing. Despite the constant improvements, the existing framework still suffers from some shortcomings. In 2020, the European Commission therefore presented an action plan for a new single EU anti-money laundering system, outlining areas for future proposals that the European Commission will present in a package in spring 2021. The main areas for this 2021 package will most likely be a proposal to transfer parts of the existing anti-money laundering Directive to a directly applicable regulation, as well as an EU level supervision with an EU-wide anti-money laundering supervisory system, and a coordination and support mechanism for Member States’ Financial Intelligence Units. This EPRS briefing presents the forthcoming Commission proposal as well as the opinions of relevant EU Institutions and stakeholders.

Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence

17-03-2021

With the rise of new technology and social media gender-based cyber violence is a constantly growing threat with impacts at individual, social and economic levels, on women and girls and on society as generally. Action taken so far has been inadequate, and the cross-border nature of gender-based cyber violence has yet to be properly addressed either. This European added value assessment (EAVA) complements the European Parliament’s own initiative legislative report on Combating Gender based Violence ...

With the rise of new technology and social media gender-based cyber violence is a constantly growing threat with impacts at individual, social and economic levels, on women and girls and on society as generally. Action taken so far has been inadequate, and the cross-border nature of gender-based cyber violence has yet to be properly addressed either. This European added value assessment (EAVA) complements the European Parliament’s own initiative legislative report on Combating Gender based Violence: Cyber Violence (2020/2035(INL)). The costs to individuals and society are substantial and shown to be in the order of €49.0 to €89.3 billion. A combination of legal and non-legal policy options would generate the greatest European added value, promote the fundamental rights of victims, reduce costs imposed on individuals and society, and support law enforcement and people working with victims.

Implementing the Anti-trafficking Directive

04-02-2021

Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims is the main EU legislative tool addressing this phenomenon. It had to be transposed into national law by 2013. However, certain obstacles to full implementation remain almost ten years after its adoption. At the February plenary session, the European Parliament is due to debate an own-initiative report assessing the directive's effectiveness.

Directive 2011/36/EU on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings and protecting its victims is the main EU legislative tool addressing this phenomenon. It had to be transposed into national law by 2013. However, certain obstacles to full implementation remain almost ten years after its adoption. At the February plenary session, the European Parliament is due to debate an own-initiative report assessing the directive's effectiveness.

Understanding EU action against migrant smuggling

19-01-2021

Around 90 % of those who cross the external European Union (EU) borders illegally do so with the assistance of migrant smugglers. Furthermore, the facilitation of irregular migration is a highly profitable criminal activity, in particular when compared with the relatively low risks incurred. Even though detections of illegal border crossings are currently at their lowest level since 2013, the migrant smuggling business shows sustained high levels of demand. This demand is not only due to the fact ...

Around 90 % of those who cross the external European Union (EU) borders illegally do so with the assistance of migrant smugglers. Furthermore, the facilitation of irregular migration is a highly profitable criminal activity, in particular when compared with the relatively low risks incurred. Even though detections of illegal border crossings are currently at their lowest level since 2013, the migrant smuggling business shows sustained high levels of demand. This demand is not only due to the fact that people in severe distress – whether for economic reasons or because of a genuine fear for their lives – keep trying to reach the EU, by irregular means if necessary. Demand is also high because illegally crossing borders has become harder, due to increased external border controls and other measures put in place to prevent irregular migration. This is where migrant smuggling networks step in. Migrant smugglers are among some of the most agile criminals. They go to great lengths in order not to get caught, quickly adapting the routes they use to smuggle migrants into the EU and their means of travel. They avoid direct contact with their victims, instead using the latest digital communication technologies and involving different intermediaries along a migrant's journey. The facilitation of irregular migration is a complex crime, interconnected with many other criminal activities, such as document fraud, trafficking in human beings or other types of illicit smuggling. Although people willingly pay smugglers to help them cross borders, they do so at great personal risk. Too many lose their lives, or are at risk of serious harm or exploitation. Therefore, preventing and combatting migrant smuggling and related crimes is one of the key priorities of the EU's action against irregular migration and organised crime. The European Parliament has repeatedly called for more and better operational cooperation, data sharing and legal migration channels, and insisted on better implementation of relevant EU legislation.

Understanding EU counter-terrorism policy

14-01-2021

Faced with a persistent international terrorist threat, the European Union (EU) is playing an ever more ambitious role in counter-terrorism. Even though primary responsibility for combating crime and ensuring security lies with the Member States, the EU provides cooperation, coordination and (to some extent) harmonisation tools, as well as financial support, to address this borderless phenomenon. Moreover, the assumption that there is a connection between development and stability, as well as between ...

Faced with a persistent international terrorist threat, the European Union (EU) is playing an ever more ambitious role in counter-terrorism. Even though primary responsibility for combating crime and ensuring security lies with the Member States, the EU provides cooperation, coordination and (to some extent) harmonisation tools, as well as financial support, to address this borderless phenomenon. Moreover, the assumption that there is a connection between development and stability, as well as between internal and external security, has come to shape EU action beyond its own borders. EU spending in the area of counter-terrorism has increased over the years, to allow for better cooperation between national law enforcement authorities and enhanced support by the EU bodies in charge of security and justice, such as Europol, eu-LISA and Eurojust. The many new rules and instruments that have been adopted in recent years range from harmonising definitions of terrorist offences and sanctions, and sharing information and data, to protecting borders, countering terrorist financing, and regulating firearms. However, implementing and evaluating the various measures is a challenging task. The European Parliament has played an active role not only in shaping legislation, but also in evaluating existing tools and gaps through the work accomplished by its Special Committee on Terrorism (TERR) in 2018. In line with the Parliament's recommendations, as well as the priorities set by the new European Commission and its counter-terrorism agenda presented in December 2020, future EU counter-terrorism action will focus on better anticipating threats, countering radicalisation and reducing vulnerabilities, by making critical infrastructures more resilient and better protecting public spaces. Upcoming developments also include increased information-sharing, by means of better implementation and modernisation of existing tools, a reinforced mandate for Europol, as well as possible investigation and prosecution of terrorist crimes at EU level, through the proposed extension of the mandate of the recently established European Public Prosecutor's Office. This briefing builds on an earlier one, entitled 'The fight against terrorism', published in 2019.

Challenges facing sports event organisers in the digital environment

17-12-2020

Piracy of online broadcast of sports events is a problem in the EU. No action at EU level in this field would lead to additional burdens on economic operators and would hamper completion of the Digital Single Market. This European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) looks at the existing EU legislation and checks if it provides sports events organizers and their licensees with an adequate level of protection against this risk. It also presents potential EU level action that could help solve the problem ...

Piracy of online broadcast of sports events is a problem in the EU. No action at EU level in this field would lead to additional burdens on economic operators and would hamper completion of the Digital Single Market. This European Added Value Assessment (EAVA) looks at the existing EU legislation and checks if it provides sports events organizers and their licensees with an adequate level of protection against this risk. It also presents potential EU level action that could help solve the problem and estimates economic benefits of addressing the problem.

Cooperation between the European Anti-Fraud Office and the European Public Prosecutor's Office

10-12-2020

The establishment of the European Public Prosecutor's Office (EPPO) with the entry into force of the EPPO Regulation of 12 October 2017 requires the regulation governing investigations by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) to be adapted. In 2018, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the OLAF Regulation as regards cooperation with the EPPO and the effectiveness of OLAF investigations. The European Parliament is expected to vote in December on the early second-reading agreement reached in ...

The establishment of the European Public Prosecutor's Office (EPPO) with the entry into force of the EPPO Regulation of 12 October 2017 requires the regulation governing investigations by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) to be adapted. In 2018, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the OLAF Regulation as regards cooperation with the EPPO and the effectiveness of OLAF investigations. The European Parliament is expected to vote in December on the early second-reading agreement reached in trilogue negotiations.

Curbing the surge in online child abuse: The dual role of digital technology in fighting and facilitating its proliferation

23-11-2020

The volume of child abuse materials circulating on the internet has increased dramatically during the pandemic, as both children and child sex offenders spend more time, and interact more, online. Enabled by digital technologies, child sex offenders have tapped into opportunities that were previously unavailable to communicate freely and directly with each other and with children, creating online communities where they share their crimes. Today, they can reach children via webcams, connected devices ...

The volume of child abuse materials circulating on the internet has increased dramatically during the pandemic, as both children and child sex offenders spend more time, and interact more, online. Enabled by digital technologies, child sex offenders have tapped into opportunities that were previously unavailable to communicate freely and directly with each other and with children, creating online communities where they share their crimes. Today, they can reach children via webcams, connected devices and chat rooms in social media and video games, while remaining anonymous thanks to technologies such as cloud computing, the dark web, end-to-end encryption and streaming. There has been a rise in grooming and sextortion incidents. Conversely, it is again digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and improved online age verification methods or age-appropriate design, which can help to curb the surge of the above crimes. Due to its capacity and speed of analysis, AI could play an important role in tackling the problem and assisting law enforcement in reducing the overwhelming amount of reports that need to be analysed. This is one of two EPRS briefings on the subject of fighting online child abuse. This one looks at technological aspects while the second one will cover legislative and policy issues.

Prihajajoči dogodki

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Drug dogodek -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Drug dogodek -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Drug dogodek -
EPRS

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