58

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Erasmus 2021-2027: The Union programme for education, training, youth and sport

05-07-2021

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme ensures the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. While Erasmus+ 2014-2020 offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming period aims to reach up to 12 million participants. The new generation programme maintains a lifelong learning approach and works towards the adoption of a European Education Area by 2025. Flagship initiatives ...

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme ensures the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. While Erasmus+ 2014-2020 offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming period aims to reach up to 12 million participants. The new generation programme maintains a lifelong learning approach and works towards the adoption of a European Education Area by 2025. Flagship initiatives include the European University Networks and the European Student Card. The new regulation also focuses on inclusion and aims at greater simplification for end-users. It incorporates sports in the main structure of the programme, expands the use of digitalisation, supports new areas of knowledge and introduces DiscoverEU, a new mobility initiative. Stakeholders agree that the previous programme has been highly beneficial but lessons need to be learnt to help the next generation programme run more efficiently and effectively. The Parliament and Council reached agreement on the proposal following the overall agreement on the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, and it was adopted in May 2021. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Hearings of the Commissioners-designate: Mariya Gabriel – Innovation and Youth

26-09-2019

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication ...

This briefing is one in a set looking at the Commissioners-designate and their portfolios as put forward by Commission President-elect Ursula von der Leyen. Each candidate faces a three-hour public hearing, organised by one or more parliamentary committees. After that process, those committees will judge the candidates' suitability for the role based on 'their general competence, European commitment and personal independence', as well as their 'knowledge of their prospective portfolio and their communication skills'. At the end of the hearings process, Parliament votes on the proposed Commission as a bloc, and under the Treaties may only reject the entire College of Commissioners, rather than individual candidates. The Briefing provides an overview of key issues in the portfolio areas, as well as Parliament's activity in the last term in that field. It also includes a brief introduction to the candidate.

Research for CULT Committee - Education and youth in the European Union – Current challenges and future prospects

02-09-2019

This study examines possible scenarios (both aspirational and disruptive) for future developments for the education and youth sectors. It also identifies and assesses the policy implications of these scenarios. Ultimately, the study informs EU policy-makers, in particular MEPs, on policy options and their implications for the education and youth sectors in the EU, and seeks to help them prepare for the scenarios identified (both in terms of facing challenges and embracing opportunities).

This study examines possible scenarios (both aspirational and disruptive) for future developments for the education and youth sectors. It also identifies and assesses the policy implications of these scenarios. Ultimately, the study informs EU policy-makers, in particular MEPs, on policy options and their implications for the education and youth sectors in the EU, and seeks to help them prepare for the scenarios identified (both in terms of facing challenges and embracing opportunities).

Zunanji avtor

RAND Europe: Axelle Devaux, Fay Dunkerley, Nadja Koch, Michaela Bruckmayer, William Phillips, Victoria Jordan

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Youth empowerment

28-06-2019

The proportion of young people (15-29 years old) in the general EU population is declining. On the whole, young people have a higher level of education than older adults, and youth unemployment rates have begun to decrease. Nevertheless, young people are still more exposed to poverty and social exclusion than other sections of the population. They are less prone to put their health at risk than previous generations. For instance, fewer young people smoke, get drunk, or become involved in a road accident ...

The proportion of young people (15-29 years old) in the general EU population is declining. On the whole, young people have a higher level of education than older adults, and youth unemployment rates have begun to decrease. Nevertheless, young people are still more exposed to poverty and social exclusion than other sections of the population. They are less prone to put their health at risk than previous generations. For instance, fewer young people smoke, get drunk, or become involved in a road accident than previously, but young people are still over-represented among those who are injured in road accidents. Obesity due to bad eating habits and lack of physical exercise is still an issue. Young people are also less likely to vote, or stand for election than older adults, but in recent years there has been a slight increase in interest in politics, political action and volunteering. Almost 80 % of young Europeans identify themselves as European citizens. In a Eurobarometer survey published in 2018 they placed education, skills and the environment at the top of a list of priorities for the EU. The European Union is engaged in helping Member States address young people's needs and aspirations through a youth strategy which covers areas such as employment, entrepreneurship, social inclusion, participation, education, training, health, wellbeing, voluntary activities, the global dimension, creativity and culture. The strategy is backed by a number of funding programmes that are specifically focused on young people, most notably the Youth Employment Initiative, Erasmus+ and the European Solidarity Corps. It also draws from funds directed at other specific policy areas. EU action in the area of youth empowerment is best known for the mobility opportunities it has created, in particular through Erasmus. Future challenges include reaching a wider spectrum of young people, especially those from disadvantaged and hard-to-reach groups, making the results of the consultative process, known as youth dialogue, more tangible, and improving synergies between policy areas for greater effectiveness. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Non-formal learning: Access and validation

10-12-2018

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains ...

Learning happens in different contexts, over the course of a lifetime, following various possible educational paths, as shown in Figure 1. In adult life, learning ranges from programmes that impart basic skills, learning groups engaged in raising awareness on various issues, mature students at university, open and distance learning, on-the-job training, courses that combine theory with practice, and classes or other learning activities taken in pursuit of a special interest. This infographic explains the modalities that non-formal learning takes across Member States.

Erasmus 2021-2027

15-11-2018

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

Research for CULT Committee - ESIF and culture, education, youth & sport – the use of European Structural and Investment Funds in policy areas of the Committee on Culture & Education

15-05-2018

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.