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Digital Europe programme: Funding digital transformation beyond 2020

26-05-2021

The Digital Europe Programme is a new financial support tool for the 2021-2027 period, aimed at bolstering the digital transformation of society, the economy and public administrations in the EU. With a financial envelope of €7.6 billion (in current prices), a figure 17.5 % lower than the initial Commission proposal, it will build up digital capacity and infrastructure and support a digital single market. The programme will operate mainly through coordinated and strategic co-investments with the ...

The Digital Europe Programme is a new financial support tool for the 2021-2027 period, aimed at bolstering the digital transformation of society, the economy and public administrations in the EU. With a financial envelope of €7.6 billion (in current prices), a figure 17.5 % lower than the initial Commission proposal, it will build up digital capacity and infrastructure and support a digital single market. The programme will operate mainly through coordinated and strategic co-investments with the Member States in the areas of high-performance computing and data processing, artificial intelligence in the public and private sectors, cybersecurity and trust, advanced digital skills and deployment, best use of digital capacities and interoperability. On 11 May 2021, the regulation establishing the programme entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The programme, dedicated to supporting the digitalisation of Europe and achieving digital sovereignty, is the first-ever such financial instrument at the EU level. Furthermore, in the context of recovery from the pandemic, Member States must allocate at least 20 % of the recovery funds to projects that digitalise their economies and societies. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Digital cultural diversity

22-04-2021

Digital technologies have revolutionised every aspect of our lives, and culture is no exception. They have impacted on the value chains of all the cultural and creative industries not only as regards the creative process and its execution but also as regards the making of a work or product of art and its promotion, distribution, marketing and sale. Cultural heritage can be digitised and, in the case of analogue film, it needs to be digitised to be made accessible. Some production processes are solely ...

Digital technologies have revolutionised every aspect of our lives, and culture is no exception. They have impacted on the value chains of all the cultural and creative industries not only as regards the creative process and its execution but also as regards the making of a work or product of art and its promotion, distribution, marketing and sale. Cultural heritage can be digitised and, in the case of analogue film, it needs to be digitised to be made accessible. Some production processes are solely digital and are born digital. Technology has a huge potential to make culture accessible to all, by democratising both consumption and involvement in cultural creation. However, technology depends on equipment and infrastructure, which does not necessarily facilitate the diversity of content available and discoverable online. Other factors, such as language, skills or geographical location can also make it harder to discover online cultural content reflecting cultural diversity. Conscious of such barriers, UNESCO has issued guidelines on the implementation of the Convention on Cultural Diversity in Digital Environments. The EU is part of this convention and has tools and funds to promote and protect cultural diversity, in line with its obligation stemming from the Treaties, not just on its own territory.

Digital Europe programme 2021-2027

21-04-2021

In 2018, under the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027, the Commission put forward a proposal for a programme aimed at building the EU's strategic digital capacities (supercomputing, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and skills) and at facilitating the deployment and uptake of digital technologies across Europe. Following an early second-reading agreement reached on 14 December 2020, Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal at second reading in April, finalising the ...

In 2018, under the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027, the Commission put forward a proposal for a programme aimed at building the EU's strategic digital capacities (supercomputing, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and skills) and at facilitating the deployment and uptake of digital technologies across Europe. Following an early second-reading agreement reached on 14 December 2020, Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal at second reading in April, finalising the ordinary legislative procedure.

Digital Services Act

30-03-2021

The IA underpinning the proposal for a Digital services act contains a lot of valuable information and is based on solid sources and broad consultations. However, the analysis could have been more coherent in its problem definition and more specific regarding the practical implementation of the assessed three broad option packages in addition to the status quo. It could have been also more transparent, precise and complete regarding the data and methods used for the analysis, and regarding the quantitative ...

The IA underpinning the proposal for a Digital services act contains a lot of valuable information and is based on solid sources and broad consultations. However, the analysis could have been more coherent in its problem definition and more specific regarding the practical implementation of the assessed three broad option packages in addition to the status quo. It could have been also more transparent, precise and complete regarding the data and methods used for the analysis, and regarding the quantitative estimates (namely in relation to SMEs). Some important information, for instance on liability rules or other elements of digital services, would have been useful in the main text instead of the annexes.

A European strategy for data

24-03-2021

Data represents the driving force of the European digital transformation. In order to harness the potential of the data economy, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. During its March II plenary session, Parliament is due to debate data issues, before voting on an own-initiative report concerning a European strategy for data and a resolution on the European Commission’s evaluation of the General Data Protection ...

Data represents the driving force of the European digital transformation. In order to harness the potential of the data economy, the European Commission aims to build a market for personal and non-personal data that fully respects European rules and values. During its March II plenary session, Parliament is due to debate data issues, before voting on an own-initiative report concerning a European strategy for data and a resolution on the European Commission’s evaluation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Digital services act

03-03-2021

The rules governing the provision of digital services in the EU have remained largely unchanged since the adoption of the e-Commerce Directive in 2000, while digital technologies and business models continue to evolve rapidly and new societal challenges are emerging, such as the spread of counterfeit goods, hate speech and disinformation online. Against this backdrop, in December 2020, the European Commission tabled a new legislative proposal on a digital services act to amend the e-Commerce Directive ...

The rules governing the provision of digital services in the EU have remained largely unchanged since the adoption of the e-Commerce Directive in 2000, while digital technologies and business models continue to evolve rapidly and new societal challenges are emerging, such as the spread of counterfeit goods, hate speech and disinformation online. Against this backdrop, in December 2020, the European Commission tabled a new legislative proposal on a digital services act to amend the e-Commerce Directive and set higher standards of transparency and accountability to govern the way platform service providers moderate content, on advertising and on algorithmic processes. Parliament has already voiced strong support for revision of the EU rules applicable to online actors. EU lawmakers will now assess whether the Commission's proposal is an appropriate response to the challenges identified and will work towards defining Parliament's own position on the proposal, which is the first step in the EU's interinstitutional legislative process.

Roaming Regulation: EU Digital Single Market policy

15-02-2021

The Roaming Regulation established the ‘Roam-Like-At-Home’ (RLAH) rule that mandated the end of retail roaming charges as of 15 June 2017 in the EU. The Regulation will be in force until 30 June 2022. In 2021, the European Commission would review the Regulation, assessing its effects and the need to prolong it. The analysis of the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) shows that a regulatory intervention is still necessary to ensure the EU citizens can continue to benefit ...

The Roaming Regulation established the ‘Roam-Like-At-Home’ (RLAH) rule that mandated the end of retail roaming charges as of 15 June 2017 in the EU. The Regulation will be in force until 30 June 2022. In 2021, the European Commission would review the Regulation, assessing its effects and the need to prolong it. The analysis of the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) shows that a regulatory intervention is still necessary to ensure the EU citizens can continue to benefit of the RLAH rule.

Priority dossiers under the Portuguese EU Council Presidency

04-01-2021

Portugal is a democratic republic with a unitary semi-presidential system of government, whereby the Prime Minister of Portugal is the head of government. The current Prime Minister is António Luís Santos da Costa, from the Socialist Party, and a former MEP who was a Vice-President of the European Parliament between July 2004 and March 2005. The President of Portugal, Marcelo de Sousa, from the Social Democrat Party, is the executive head of state and has several significant political powers. Executive ...

Portugal is a democratic republic with a unitary semi-presidential system of government, whereby the Prime Minister of Portugal is the head of government. The current Prime Minister is António Luís Santos da Costa, from the Socialist Party, and a former MEP who was a Vice-President of the European Parliament between July 2004 and March 2005. The President of Portugal, Marcelo de Sousa, from the Social Democrat Party, is the executive head of state and has several significant political powers. Executive power is exercised by the President and the Council of Ministers. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the Assembly of the Republic. The Judiciary of Portugal is independent of the executive and the legislature. The political landscape is composed of several political parties, primarily the Socialist Party (PS) and the Social Democratic Party (PSD). Other parties are the Popular Party (PP), the Portuguese Communist Party (PCP), the Left Bloc (BE) and the Green Ecologist Party (PEV). The Communists and the Greens are in coalition as the Unitary Democratic Coalition (UDC). Portugal will hold the Presidency of the European Council for the fourth time from 1 January 2021. The last time it held the Presidency was in 2007, when the Treaty of Lisbon was signed on 13 December 2007. Portugal is part of the Trio also composed of Germany and Slovenia. The Trio adopted a Declaration outlining the main areas of focus for their Trio, including democracy, human rights and the rule of law, as well as an economically strong EU based on growth and jobs and the social dimension. Likewise the three Member States pledged to work on the challenges of digitalisation, climate change and energy transition. The Strategic Agenda 2019-2024 endorsed by the Member States at the European Council on 20 June 2019 will remain, however, a guiding instrument. The Agenda covers the protection of citizens' freedoms; developing a strong and vibrant economic base; building a climate-neutral, green, fair and social Europe; and promoting European interests and values on the global stage.

Taxation of the digital economy: Latest developments

15-12-2020

There is an important ongoing debate on the direct and indirect taxation of the digital economy. Proposals on digital taxes, which are under negotiation in the OECD, are inter-linked with European Commission proposals on the same subject. As the Council did not reach an agreement on the Commission proposal for a digital services tax, national initiatives appeared in the interim until a global solution in the area of direct taxation could be found in the OECD. On 1 December 2020, the Council endorsed ...

There is an important ongoing debate on the direct and indirect taxation of the digital economy. Proposals on digital taxes, which are under negotiation in the OECD, are inter-linked with European Commission proposals on the same subject. As the Council did not reach an agreement on the Commission proposal for a digital services tax, national initiatives appeared in the interim until a global solution in the area of direct taxation could be found in the OECD. On 1 December 2020, the Council endorsed the text of amendments to the Directive on Administrative Cooperation between the Member States (known as DAC7), which will oblige digital platform operators to provide information on the operations they intermediate. If an agreement is not achieved at global level by July 2021, it could trigger an EU response in the form of a digital levy. There is also a debate on whether that levy should be similar to the Commission proposal that failed to get political backing or not.

Strengthening digital operational resilience in the financial sector

11-12-2020

This briefing provides an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying Commission proposals to strengthen digital operational resilience in the EU, which are part of the digital finance package. The IA would have benefited from a more balanced set of options, and it would have been useful to further clarify the arguments supporting the choice between options 2 and 3. The assessment of social impacts is very limited, and the competitiveness ...

This briefing provides an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying Commission proposals to strengthen digital operational resilience in the EU, which are part of the digital finance package. The IA would have benefited from a more balanced set of options, and it would have been useful to further clarify the arguments supporting the choice between options 2 and 3. The assessment of social impacts is very limited, and the competitiveness aspect raised could also have been discussed at greater length. The IA estimates that the initiative would benefit SMEs in terms of reduced administrative burden and improved capacity to operate in a cross-border context. In addition to the qualitative assessment, the IA provides quantified estimates, openly recognising some data limitations.

Prihajajoči dogodki

28-06-2021
Child protection under EU law
Predstavitev -
JURI
01-07-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable:The post-pandemic EU political system [...]
Drug dogodek -
EPRS
01-07-2021
AIDA-ECON Public Hearing on AI and Financial Services
Predstavitev -
AIDA ECON

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