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CAP Amending Regulation (CMO): Amending regulations on the CMO for agricultural products, quality schemes and measures for remote regions

19-01-2021

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote ...

On 1 July 2018, as part of the work on the EU's 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework, the European Commission proposed a package of three regulations with the aim of reshaping and modernising the common agricultural policy (CAP). One of these proposals, the Amending Regulation, introduces changes to rules governing the common market organisation (CMO) in agricultural products (including the rules on wine), the EU quality schemes (geographical indications) and the support measures for remote regions. The aim is to equip agricultural markets and support measures to face new challenges, update provisions, simplify procedures and ensure consistency with other regulations on the future CAP. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP horizontal regulation: Financing, management and monitoring of the common agricultural policy for 2021-2027

18-01-2021

As part of the preparation of the EU budget for 2021-2027, the European Commission put forward a new set of regulations to shape the future EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on 1 June 2018. The proposal for a regulation on the financing, management and monitoring of the CAP provides the legislative framework for adapting the financing, management and monitoring rules to a new CAP delivery model. This seeks to achieve more subsidiarity and simplification, with greater responsibility given to Member ...

As part of the preparation of the EU budget for 2021-2027, the European Commission put forward a new set of regulations to shape the future EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on 1 June 2018. The proposal for a regulation on the financing, management and monitoring of the CAP provides the legislative framework for adapting the financing, management and monitoring rules to a new CAP delivery model. This seeks to achieve more subsidiarity and simplification, with greater responsibility given to Member States, a shift from ensuring single transaction compliance to monitoring system performance in each Member State, and reduced 'red tape', among other things. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP strategic plans

18-01-2021

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the ...

The Commission's legislative proposals on the future of the common agricultural policy (CAP) were published on 1 June 2018. They comprise three proposals: a regulation setting out rules on support for CAP strategic plans; a regulation on the single common market organisation (CMO) and a horizontal regulation on financing, managing and monitoring the CAP. The proposal for a regulation on CAP strategic plans introduces a new delivery model, described by the Commission as a fundamental shift in the CAP, involving a shift from compliance towards results and performance. It includes a new distribution of responsibilities between the EU and Member States. A new planning process is proposed which will cover both Pillar I (direct payments) and Pillar II (rural development) of the CAP. Second edition of a briefing originally drafted by James McEldowney and Patrick Kelly. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

CAP transitional rules for 2021 and 2022

10-12-2020

The lengthy negotiations on the EU budget and farm policy post-2020 convinced the European Commission to put forward rules in 2019 to ensure continuity of EU support for farmers and rural areas. The European Parliament is set to debate and vote on these transitional rules, extending current EU farm policy until the new common agricultural policy framework is in place (i.e. until the end of 2022), during the December plenary session.

The lengthy negotiations on the EU budget and farm policy post-2020 convinced the European Commission to put forward rules in 2019 to ensure continuity of EU support for farmers and rural areas. The European Parliament is set to debate and vote on these transitional rules, extending current EU farm policy until the new common agricultural policy framework is in place (i.e. until the end of 2022), during the December plenary session.

Older people in the European Union's rural areas: Issues and challenges

10-12-2020

One of the key demographic challenges facing rural areas is the ageing population, not only among farmers but also among the rural population in general. This paper examines the demographic profile of older people in the EU's rural areas, and presents a series of issues pertaining to the situation facing older people. Topics covered include health and access to services, issues of social isolation and loneliness, the role of technology and lifelong learning, access to social care, and the impact ...

One of the key demographic challenges facing rural areas is the ageing population, not only among farmers but also among the rural population in general. This paper examines the demographic profile of older people in the EU's rural areas, and presents a series of issues pertaining to the situation facing older people. Topics covered include health and access to services, issues of social isolation and loneliness, the role of technology and lifelong learning, access to social care, and the impact of climate change. The impact of the coronavirus pandemic has brought the health status of older people more sharply into focus and highlighted their vulnerability. The views of a number of stakeholders are summarised along with the measures available under the EU's rural development policy and other structural funds.

End the cage age: Looking for alternatives

30-11-2020

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, presents alternatives for cage housing of farm animals and laying hens and sows in particular. Cage-free housing has a positive effect on the behavioural freedom and welfare of animals. No major problems arise with regard to other aspects of sustainability. Research shows that cage-free housing is currently possible or will be in the future. ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the PETI Committee, presents alternatives for cage housing of farm animals and laying hens and sows in particular. Cage-free housing has a positive effect on the behavioural freedom and welfare of animals. No major problems arise with regard to other aspects of sustainability. Research shows that cage-free housing is currently possible or will be in the future. A shift towards cage-free housing systems may be achieved by financial and policy measures in the short term and legislation in the long term.

Zunanji avtor

Prof. dr. ir. T. Bas RODENBURG, Professor of Animal Welfare1,5, Maite A.A.M. VAN GERWEN MSc, Project leader and PhD candidate2, Dr. Ellen MEIJER, Assistant Professor1, Dr. Tijs J. TOBIAS, Assistant Professor3, Dr. Mona F. GIERSBERG, Researcher1, Dr. Vivian C. GOERLICH-JANSSON, Assistant Professor1, Dr. Rebecca E. NORDQUIST, Assistant Professor 1, Dr. Franck L.B. MEIJBOOM, Associate Professor 2,4,5, Prof. dr. Saskia S. ARNDT, Professor of Animal Behaviour11Animals in Science and Society, Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 2Centre for Sustainable Animals Stewardship, Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, 3Farm Animal Health, Department Population Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 4Ethics Institute, Faculty of Humanities, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 5Adaptation Physiology Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Research for the AGRI Committee - The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources

24-11-2020

This document is the final report of the study developed by INRAE and AgroParisTech for the European Parliament: “The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources’’ (IP/B/AGRI/IC/2020-036).

This document is the final report of the study developed by INRAE and AgroParisTech for the European Parliament: “The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources’’ (IP/B/AGRI/IC/2020-036).

Zunanji avtor

Hervé GUYOMARD; Jean-Christophe BUREAU; Vincent CHATELLIER; Cécile DETANG-DESSENDRE; Pierre DUPRAZ; Florence JACQUET; Xavier REBOUD; Vincent REQUILLART; Louis-Georges SOLER; Margot TYSEBAERT

Research for the AGRI Committee - The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources

23-11-2020

This document is the final report of the study developed by INRAE and AgroParisTech for the European Parliament: “The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources’’ (IP/B/AGRI/IC/2020-036).

This document is the final report of the study developed by INRAE and AgroParisTech for the European Parliament: “The Green Deal and the CAP: policy implications to adapt farming practices and to preserve the EU’s natural resources’’ (IP/B/AGRI/IC/2020-036).

Zunanji avtor

Hervé GUYOMARD; Jean-Christophe BUREAU; Vincent CHATELLIER; Cécile DETANG-DESSENDRE; Pierre DUPRAZ; Florence JACQUET; Xavier REBOUD; Vincent REQUILLART; Louis-Georges SOLER; Margot TYSEBAERT

Farm to Fork strategy - An overview of Parliament’s positions

12-11-2020

The aim of this briefing is to give an overview of positions the European Parliament has taken over the last twenty years that are relevant to the Farm to Fork strategy, the component of the European Green Deal that aims for a fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly food system. Despite it being a new strategy, most of its 27 actions are connected to already existing legislation and as such, Parliament has previously given its opinion on the subjects covered by the strategy. This briefing presents ...

The aim of this briefing is to give an overview of positions the European Parliament has taken over the last twenty years that are relevant to the Farm to Fork strategy, the component of the European Green Deal that aims for a fair, healthy and environmentally-friendly food system. Despite it being a new strategy, most of its 27 actions are connected to already existing legislation and as such, Parliament has previously given its opinion on the subjects covered by the strategy. This briefing presents a short summary of Parliament’s most relevant positions in the past.

What future for the social economy?

11-11-2020

Traditionally the social economy is considered to be an ever-growing set of private, formally organised enterprises and networks that build on multiple types of resources and cooperation, with local anchorage and democratic and participatory decision-making processes. Its primary aim is not to make profit but to meet the needs of its members and that of the wider society. The social economy is active in an increasing number of sectors, and while some of its actors are small non-profit organisations ...

Traditionally the social economy is considered to be an ever-growing set of private, formally organised enterprises and networks that build on multiple types of resources and cooperation, with local anchorage and democratic and participatory decision-making processes. Its primary aim is not to make profit but to meet the needs of its members and that of the wider society. The social economy is active in an increasing number of sectors, and while some of its actors are small non-profit organisations, others are large organisations with international outreach. It generates 6 to 8 % of the European Union's gross domestic product (GDP). However, it is a driver not only of economic activity but also of normative values, such as solidarity and inclusion. Since its conception in the 19th century, it has taken on board innovation in social relations and in societal and community spheres, human development targets and socio-political empowerment. In the first two decades of the 21st century, with new risks and opportunities arising owing to the twin digital and green transformations there is an emerging debate, rethinking economic growth theories with more focus on inclusion and combatting inequality, and exploring the relevance of traditional welfare state models. This debate has intensified in the wake of the 2008 crisis, and now also as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and crisis. The social economy can play a central role in this context. While it has been badly affected by these crises, it also has the potential to mitigate some of the negative impacts. The social economy's values-based approach to the economy can enable it to generate new elements in the ecosystems in which it exists and be an important 'engine' in the immediate recovery and the longer-term possible restructuring of the economy towards more resilience, fairness and sustainability. For the social economy to be able to reach its full potential across the Member States and help to achieve green and inclusive growth with renewed welfare state models, it needs to be supported simultaneously at all levels. EU action can contribute to this. The main areas of EU intervention are: facilitating access to finance and markets, including the digital single market; creating better framework conditions, including for cooperation and cross-border activity; supporting innovation, including new business models; and developing international relations. The Commission action plan on the social economy expected in 2021 might address many of these issues.

Prihajajoči dogodki

26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Predstavitev -
PECH
26-01-2021
The impact of Brexit on the level playing field in the area of taxation
Predstavitev -
FISC
27-01-2021
Public hearing on AI and Green Deal
Predstavitev -
AIDA

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