400

rezultati

Beseda/besede
Vrsta publikacije
Politično področje
Avtor
Ključna beseda
Datum

Outermost regions of the EU

25-05-2021

The European Union's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties – such as remoteness, difficult topography and economic dependence on a few products – that can severely hamper their development. Specific support mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission outlining measures aimed at assisting outermost regions in communications published in 2004, 2008, and 2012. Nevertheless, with the outermost regions continuing ...

The European Union's outermost regions qualify for special treatment owing to structural difficulties – such as remoteness, difficult topography and economic dependence on a few products – that can severely hamper their development. Specific support mechanisms exist under cohesion, agricultural and fisheries policies, with the Commission outlining measures aimed at assisting outermost regions in communications published in 2004, 2008, and 2012. Nevertheless, with the outermost regions continuing to face numerous challenges in areas such as mobility, unemployment and climate change, discussions were launched on the formulation of a new strategy, which was published in October 2017. Offering a new approach to supporting the outermost regions' development by optimising their assets, exploiting new opportunities for growth and jobs, and focusing more on their specific circumstances and needs, the 2017 communication outlines a series of concrete and coordinated actions, calling for stronger partnership between outermost regions, Member States and the EU. In May 2018, the Commission put forward a broad package of proposals for the 2021-2027 period, providing the legislative framework needed to guide the strategy beyond 2020, taking account of the specific needs of outermost regions in a total of 21 proposals. Following political agreement between the European Parliament and Council, this new framework includes a number of new benefits for outermost regions, such as the right to use EU funds for investments in airport infrastructure, and extends many special measures from the 2014-2020 period. Published in March 2020, the European Commission report on implementation of the recommendations of the 2017 communication considers that concrete results have been delivered and that the process is going in the right direction. Yet with development continuing to lag behind in the outermost regions, it is clear that challenges persist, a situation that has been compounded by the heavy impact of the coronavirus pandemic in the outermost regions. This has led to calls for a new strategy, with European Commissioner Elisa Ferreira recently announcing plans to present a new communication in 2022. In light of the serious structural challenges facing these regions, however, it remains to be seen whether a future strategy and the special measures put forward for the post-2020 period will together be sufficient to close the inequalities gap with the rest of the EU. This is a revised and updated version of a briefing from May 2020.

Brexit adjustment reserve

18-05-2021

As part of the preparations for the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, the European Council agreed in July 2020 to create a Brexit adjustment reserve within the special instruments outside the budget ceilings of the European Union's multiannual financial framework, with a budget of €5 billion to counter unforeseen and adverse consequences in Member States and sectors that are most affected. The European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the Brexit adjustment reserve ...

As part of the preparations for the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union, the European Council agreed in July 2020 to create a Brexit adjustment reserve within the special instruments outside the budget ceilings of the European Union's multiannual financial framework, with a budget of €5 billion to counter unforeseen and adverse consequences in Member States and sectors that are most affected. The European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on the Brexit adjustment reserve on 25 December 2020. Under the proposal, the reserve will support public expenditure incurred by Member States from 1 July 2020 to 31 December 2022 for eligible measures, which include support for affected sectors, training, or new border facilities. Funding will be available for all Member States, distributed in two allocation tranches, with 80 % of the resources due to be allocated to Member States in the form of pre-financing, to be disbursed in 2021. Each country's pre-financing allocation is calculated based on the importance of its trade with the United Kingdom (UK) and, where applicable, its dependence on fisheries in UK waters. All Member States will have to submit an application for funding by 30 September 2023, and those whose eligible expenditure exceeds both the pre-financing amount and 0.06 % of their national gross domestic product will be eligible for an additional contribution, to be paid in 2024. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

EU climate action in ocean governance and fisheries policy

22-04-2021

Marine resources are a vital and growing source of food for human consumption, while oceans also play an important role in climate regulation. Scientific evidence shows that the climate system has changed rapidly in recent decades, with the oceans greatly mitigating the effects of climate change by absorbing excess heat and human-made carbon emissions. The velocity of the effects of climate change leaves little room for adaptation, causing both declines in abundance and geographic shifts in fish ...

Marine resources are a vital and growing source of food for human consumption, while oceans also play an important role in climate regulation. Scientific evidence shows that the climate system has changed rapidly in recent decades, with the oceans greatly mitigating the effects of climate change by absorbing excess heat and human-made carbon emissions. The velocity of the effects of climate change leaves little room for adaptation, causing both declines in abundance and geographic shifts in fish populations. As a result, people who rely heavily on seafood and fisheries for their livelihoods run the risk of income loss and food insecurity. The European Green Deal places climate action at the heart of a wide range of new legislative and non-legislative initiatives and includes ambitious goals such as achieving climate-neutrality by 2050 and preserving and protecting biodiversity. The new 'farm to fork' strategy addresses the challenges of sustainability in the food supply chain and, in the area of seafood, highlights the imminent update of the strategic guidelines on aquaculture, the goal to support the algae industry and the focus on climate change in the 2022 common fisheries policy review. In its biodiversity strategy, the Commission proposes a new binding target of 30 % marine protected areas in EU waters by 2030, a target supported by Parliament. A reduction in fishing pressure could also offset the environmental impacts of climate change. The last reform of the common fisheries policy marked an important milestone by requiring fish stocks to be restored and maintained above levels capable of producing the maximum sustainable yield. An own-initiative report from Parliament's Committee on Fisheries focuses specifically on the impact of rising seawater temperatures on fish stocks and fisheries. The oceans can be harnessed to help to close the emissions gap however, by unlocking their renewable offshore energy potential. In its offshore renewable energy strategy, the Commission aims to reach a deployment of 300 GW in offshore wind capacity by 2050, a 20-fold increase compared to today. Another own-initiative report from Parliament's Committee on Fisheries looks into the impact on the fishing sector of offshore wind and other renewable energy systems.

European Maritime and Fisheries Fund 2021-2027

06-04-2021

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater ...

As part of the EU budget framework for the 2021-2027 period, the European Commission proposed in June 2018 a regulation to continue the fund dedicated to the Common Fisheries Policy and the Integrated Maritime Policy. On 4 April 2019, Parliament adopted its first reading position on the file. After lengthy interinstitutional negotiations, started after the 2019 elections, political agreement was reached on 4 December 2020. The new fund allows for more flexibility in national programmes. A greater focus on aquaculture is reflected in its inclusion in the name of the fund. A thorny issue in the negotiations was support for investment in fishing vessels, on which the co legislators wanted to go beyond the proposal. The compromise allows aid for vessels up to 24 metres long: support for the first acquisition of a vessel by a young fisherman, the replacement or modernisation of engines, and operations that improve safety, working conditions or energy efficiency. The measures come with restrictive conditions, such as the respect of fishing capacity ceilings. At least 15 % of Member States' allocations should be spent on control and data collection. The agreed text was endorsed by the Committee on Fisheries on 22 February 2021. After adoption by the Council, Parliament is expected to adopt the text and complete the procedure at second reading.

Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing

31-03-2021

The IUU Regulation (1005/2008) is the core of the EU’s legal framework for action against global IUU fishing. Its primary objective is to prevent, deter and eliminate the trade of IUU-caught products into the EU. One of its key components is a multiple-step procedure for dealing with non-EU countries considered uncooperative in the fight against IUU fishing. Fifth edition. This infographic further updates an earlier one of February 2020. For more information on IUU fishing and the EU's IUU Regulation ...

The IUU Regulation (1005/2008) is the core of the EU’s legal framework for action against global IUU fishing. Its primary objective is to prevent, deter and eliminate the trade of IUU-caught products into the EU. One of its key components is a multiple-step procedure for dealing with non-EU countries considered uncooperative in the fight against IUU fishing. Fifth edition. This infographic further updates an earlier one of February 2020. For more information on IUU fishing and the EU's IUU Regulation 1005/2008, see EPRS briefing: PE 614.598.

Revising the fisheries control system

04-03-2021

During the March I part-session, Parliament is expected to vote on the European Commission's proposal to revise the fisheries control system, centred on the amendment of the Control Regulation 1224/2009. The Committee on Fisheries has adopted a report that supports the proposal on major aspects, such as tracking of all EU fishing vessels, reporting of all catches, monitoring of recreational fisheries and improving traceability along the supply chain for all fishery and aquaculture products, whether ...

During the March I part-session, Parliament is expected to vote on the European Commission's proposal to revise the fisheries control system, centred on the amendment of the Control Regulation 1224/2009. The Committee on Fisheries has adopted a report that supports the proposal on major aspects, such as tracking of all EU fishing vessels, reporting of all catches, monitoring of recreational fisheries and improving traceability along the supply chain for all fishery and aquaculture products, whether from EU fisheries or imported. The report also backs the proposal on harmonising sanctions for infringements of fisheries rules across the EU, and requires the creation of a 'Union register' of infringements centralising Member States' information. In the same line of harmonised control, the report introduces uniform formats throughout the EU for a wide range of documents. The PECH report departs from the proposal as regards the mandatory use of on-board CCTV cameras to control the landing obligation, only allowing it on a voluntary basis (if associated with incentives such as quota increases), or as an accompanying sanction for vessels that commit repeated infringements. The report amends the proposal to exempt vessels under 10 m in length from the obligation to keep electronic logbooks, and to introduce derogations to the weighing of fishery products upon landing. It increases the margin of tolerance in estimates recorded in the fishing logbook, in particular for small pelagic and tuna species. It also limits the continuous monitoring of the engine power to vessels exceeding 221 kilowatts that operate under fishing effort regimes.

New EU rules on fisheries control

03-03-2021

Fisheries control aims to ensure compliance with the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), and is therefore a key condition for its success. The EU control system is currently under revision, with a European Commission proposal intended to modernise the monitoring of fisheries activities, improve enforcement and update the rules in line with the latest CFP reform. Parliament's vote on the revision is scheduled for the March I part-session.

Fisheries control aims to ensure compliance with the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), and is therefore a key condition for its success. The EU control system is currently under revision, with a European Commission proposal intended to modernise the monitoring of fisheries activities, improve enforcement and update the rules in line with the latest CFP reform. Parliament's vote on the revision is scheduled for the March I part-session.

Marketing standards for fishery and aquaculture products: Revision of Regulation (EC) No1379/2013

01-03-2021

The marketing standards for fishery and aquaculture products are covered by the Common Market Organisation (CMO) Regulation (regulation 1379/2013), one of the pillars of EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). The marketing standards for FAPs have remained unchanged for more than 20 years and in 2018 they were submitted to an evaluation process by the European Commission. The expected outcome is the release of a new legislative proposal by the first half of 2021, in line with the European Commission's ...

The marketing standards for fishery and aquaculture products are covered by the Common Market Organisation (CMO) Regulation (regulation 1379/2013), one of the pillars of EU’s Common Fisheries Policy (CFP). The marketing standards for FAPs have remained unchanged for more than 20 years and in 2018 they were submitted to an evaluation process by the European Commission. The expected outcome is the release of a new legislative proposal by the first half of 2021, in line with the European Commission's Farm to Fork strategy.

EU-UK relations in fisheries

25-02-2021

The United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union has brought significant uncertainty for the fisheries sector. Fisheries, and especially EU fishing rights in UK waters, played a prominent role in the recent negotiations on future EU-UK relations and ultimately became the final obstacle to reaching an agreement, being the very last point to be agreed. The new EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, settled on 24 December 2020, marks an important milestone in the long history of fisheries relations ...

The United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union has brought significant uncertainty for the fisheries sector. Fisheries, and especially EU fishing rights in UK waters, played a prominent role in the recent negotiations on future EU-UK relations and ultimately became the final obstacle to reaching an agreement, being the very last point to be agreed. The new EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, settled on 24 December 2020, marks an important milestone in the long history of fisheries relations in the North-east Atlantic. The agreement maintains full access to waters until 30 June 2026, with part of the EU quota shares gradually transferred to the UK during this period. After 1 July 2026, access to waters will be decided by a process of annual consultations. The quota shares will remain stable at the 2025 level, and can only be changed with the mutual consent of both parties. The Trade and Cooperation Agreement ensures that fisheries and aquaculture products continue to be traded without tariffs, but non-tariff measures associated with the UK leaving the EU common market, such as certification requirements and customs controls, will involve slower and more expensive trade flows.

Support for fishermen affected by the eastern Baltic cod closure

22-02-2021

Eastern Baltic cod has long supported the livelihoods of many Baltic fishermen, but stocks of this valuable fish have been declining sharply in recent years. Every year since 2014, total allowable catches have been reduced accordingly. Scientific advice published in May 2019 reinforced the concerns regarding eastern Baltic cod, and estimated the stock to be below safe biological limits. Scientists point to high natural mortality resulting from various environmental pressures, including a lack of ...

Eastern Baltic cod has long supported the livelihoods of many Baltic fishermen, but stocks of this valuable fish have been declining sharply in recent years. Every year since 2014, total allowable catches have been reduced accordingly. Scientific advice published in May 2019 reinforced the concerns regarding eastern Baltic cod, and estimated the stock to be below safe biological limits. Scientists point to high natural mortality resulting from various environmental pressures, including a lack of salinity, little oxygen, pollution, high water temperatures and parasite infestation. In July 2019, as an emergency measure, the Commission imposed an immediate closure of the fishery, with the exception of a limited amount arising from by-catch. Subsequently, fishing opportunities for 2020 and 2021 were limited to by-catches. As recovery of the stock is not expected before 2024, the Commission issued a proposal in order to allow support for permanent cessation. After two trilogue meetings, the Council and Parliament reached provisional agreement on the proposal on 22 September 2020. The agreement extended the scope of the support to include fishermen targeting cod and herring in the western Baltic, due to the poor state of, and reduced fishing opportunities for, those stocks. The agreed text was adopted by the EP on 11 November 2020 and by the Council on 13 November 2020. It was published in the Official Journal on 30 November 2020. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Prihajajoči dogodki

17-06-2021
Policy Department workshop on ETS
Drug dogodek -
TRAN
17-06-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Peace and security in the world today [...]
Drug dogodek -
EPRS
17-06-2021
Bridging the gender gap in digital, research and industry: what is the way forward?
Delavnica -
ITRE

Partnerji