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resultat

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Animal welfare on the farm - ex-post evaluation of the EU legislation: Prospects for animal welfare labelling at EU level - European Implementation Assessment

11-06-2021

The European Union (EU) has a long history of regulating the welfare of farmed animals. Currently, the 'on-farm' aspects of animal welfare (AW) are regulated by five directives adopted by the Council of the EU. The European Parliament is scrutinising the implementation of the EU legislation through a dedicated report (with the Agriculture and Rural Development Committee (AGRI) taking the lead and the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee (ENVI) giving its opinion). This European Implementation ...

The European Union (EU) has a long history of regulating the welfare of farmed animals. Currently, the 'on-farm' aspects of animal welfare (AW) are regulated by five directives adopted by the Council of the EU. The European Parliament is scrutinising the implementation of the EU legislation through a dedicated report (with the Agriculture and Rural Development Committee (AGRI) taking the lead and the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee (ENVI) giving its opinion). This European Implementation Assessment (EIA), aimed at providing evidence in support of the committees' work on the report, shows that the implementation of the EU acquis has been challenging. Based on a large data collection programme, it presents findings on the implementation of the EU legislation against the standard criteria for ex-post evaluation, namely relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, coherence and EU added value. The EIA also maps and assesses AW labelling systems operating across the EU in terms of their design (including their scientific substantiation), regulatory status and functioning (including their effectiveness, efficiency and transparency). Furthermore, the paper analyses the prospects for a possible introduction of AW labelling at EU level.

Waste Shipment Regulation

08-04-2021

The New Circular Economy Action Plan is one of the main building blocks of the European Green Deal. It sets initiatives along the entire lifecycle of products with the aim to ensure that the resources used for their production, including the waste generated, are kept in the EU economy for as long as possible. At the same time, the circular economy policy aims at protecting the environment and empowering the consumers. Waste shipment within and outside the EU has a crucial role in achieving the EU ...

The New Circular Economy Action Plan is one of the main building blocks of the European Green Deal. It sets initiatives along the entire lifecycle of products with the aim to ensure that the resources used for their production, including the waste generated, are kept in the EU economy for as long as possible. At the same time, the circular economy policy aims at protecting the environment and empowering the consumers. Waste shipment within and outside the EU has a crucial role in achieving the EU circular economy objectives. At EU level, the transboundary movements of waste are governed by Regulation (EC) 1013/2006 on shipments of waste (WSR). However, the current design and implementation of the regulation suffer from deficiencies and thus challenge the achievement of the EU circular economy objectives. This Implementation Appraisal looks at the practical implementation of the WSR in light of the Commission proposal for a revision of the regulation expected in the second quarter of 2021.

EU climate action policy: Responding to the global emergency

18-03-2021

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate ...

The European Green Deal aims to make the European Union climate-neutral by 2050, a target supported by all EU institutions. With this objective, the EU takes a leading role in addressing the global climate emergency. Achieving the climate-neutrality goal requires massive investment and an unprecedented transformation of all sectors of the economy. This study explains the physical basis of climate change and highlights its expected impacts on the EU. To give an overview of EU and international climate policies, it outlines international climate agreements, EU climate action and the climate policies of major economies. It assesses the coherence of EU climate policy with other policy areas, and presents the financing of EU climate action through the EU budget and other instruments. To assess the implications of the climate neutrality objective, the study analysis the challenges and opportunities for the EU economy and its impacts on issues such as international relations, migration, trade, consumers and health . The final chapter addresses the issues facing European decision-makers and the outlook for European and global climate action in the context of the coronavirus pandemic.

EU policy on air quality: Implementation of selected EU legislation

18-01-2021

Air pollution is a cross-border problem with direct negative effects on health and the environment. It also has indirect but tangible adverse effects on economies and societies. With the aim of securing good air quality status for its citizens and the environment, the EU has established a policy framework that employs legal regulation as the main policy instrument. This European implementation assessment (EIA) presents findings on the implementation of three major pieces of EU legislation on air ...

Air pollution is a cross-border problem with direct negative effects on health and the environment. It also has indirect but tangible adverse effects on economies and societies. With the aim of securing good air quality status for its citizens and the environment, the EU has established a policy framework that employs legal regulation as the main policy instrument. This European implementation assessment (EIA) presents findings on the implementation of three major pieces of EU legislation on air quality, namely the two Ambient Air Quality Directives and the Industrial Emissions Directive, and makes recommendations for policy action. In addition, the research paper annexed to this EIA maps and assesses the local policies designed and implemented by 10 EU agglomerations with the aim of tackling air pollution from relevant sources, and, in particular, from road transport. It also makes recommendations for policy action, some of which are relevant to any other EU zone/agglomeration affected by air pollution exceedances, irrespective of specific local conditions. Furthermore, the research paper studies the effects of the first wave of pandemic lock-down measures implemented in the same 10 EU agglomerations and their effects on concentrations of certain air pollutants (particularly harmful for health), and, on this basis, outlines lessons that could be applied in future policy-making on air quality at all levels of governance.

Batteries Directive

01-10-2020

The EU should create a competitive and sustainable battery manufacturing industry. The EU needs, therefore, a regulatory framework fit for purpose. However, this briefing shows that the design and implementation of the Batteries Directive, which is the main legal act regulating batteries and accumulators at EU level, suffer from deficiencies that makes it impossible for this piece of EU law to adequately respond to new policy challenges. Some of the most pertinent shortcomings of the directive relate ...

The EU should create a competitive and sustainable battery manufacturing industry. The EU needs, therefore, a regulatory framework fit for purpose. However, this briefing shows that the design and implementation of the Batteries Directive, which is the main legal act regulating batteries and accumulators at EU level, suffer from deficiencies that makes it impossible for this piece of EU law to adequately respond to new policy challenges. Some of the most pertinent shortcomings of the directive relate to its incapacity to incorporate technical innovation, problems with certain definitions, the performance of Member States as regards the collection of waste batteries, as well as the insufficient recovery of materials from used batteries. Therefore, the Commission has scheduled a revision of the legal framework.

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 on the Placing of Plant Protection Products on the Market

24-04-2018

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 lays down the main instruments for placing effective plant protection products (using pesticide substances) on the market that are safe for humans, animals and the environment, while at the same time ensuring effective functioning of the internal market and improved agricultural production. This European Implementation Assessment found that the above objectives, while largely relevant to real needs, are not being achieved in practice. In particular, implementation of the ...

Regulation (EC) 1107/2009 lays down the main instruments for placing effective plant protection products (using pesticide substances) on the market that are safe for humans, animals and the environment, while at the same time ensuring effective functioning of the internal market and improved agricultural production. This European Implementation Assessment found that the above objectives, while largely relevant to real needs, are not being achieved in practice. In particular, implementation of the main instruments of the regulation – substance approval, plant protection products authorisation and enforcement of the regulatory decisions taken in the frame of the approvals and authorisations, is problematic, which also affect other related EU policies. Nevertheless, despite the implementation challenges observed, stakeholders – including national competent authorities, health/environment NGOs, manufacturers of substances and plant protection products and their users (farmers) – agree that the EU is the appropriate level at which regulatory action in the field of pesticides (used in plant protection products) should continue to take place.

Extern avdelning

Annex I written by Florent PELSY and Lise OULÈS from Milieu Ltd (Belgium) and Evelyn UNDERWOOD (Institute for European Environmental Policy, IEEP). Annex II written by Dr Emanuela BOZZINI (University of Trento, Italy). Annex III written by Dr Olivia HAMLYN (University of Leicester, United Kingdom). Annex IV written by Dr Dovilė RIMKUTĖ (University of Leiden, The Netherlands)

Implementation of the 7th Environment Action Programme - Mid-term review

22-11-2017

The 7th Environment Action Programme (7th EAP) is the long term overarching strategy of the EU and its Member States in the field of environment and climate change. It covers a seven-year time frame (between 2014 and 2020) and is the first to set a long-term vision for policy-making in the field, until 2050. This European Implementation Assessment found that while the EAP scope remains relevant to current needs and adds value to EU and national policy-making efforts, its objectives are unlikely to ...

The 7th Environment Action Programme (7th EAP) is the long term overarching strategy of the EU and its Member States in the field of environment and climate change. It covers a seven-year time frame (between 2014 and 2020) and is the first to set a long-term vision for policy-making in the field, until 2050. This European Implementation Assessment found that while the EAP scope remains relevant to current needs and adds value to EU and national policy-making efforts, its objectives are unlikely to be fully met by 2020, despite sporadic progress in some areas. Another key finding in this document is that environmental and climate-related concerns are not sufficiently integrated into a number of EU policies. These findings were made on the basis of publicly available sources of information (specifically aimed at informing the evaluation of the 7th EAP) and views shared in the course of the targeted stakeholder consultation in support of this document.

Extern avdelning

The stakeholder consultation (published in Annex VI to the European Implementation Assessment) has been written by Dr Asel Doranova, Ruslan Zhechkov, Joost Jan van Barneveld, Nathan Kably from Technopolis Group and Dr Katarina Svatikova, Robert Williams, Louise Kjaer Hansen, Irati Artola from Trinomics at the request of the Ex-Post Evaluation Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament.

Mining Waste Directive 2006/21/EC

10-01-2017

In the aftermath of two major accidents involving the spill of hazardous extractive waste, the Mining Waste Directive 2006/21/EC was adopted at EU level with the aim to prevent, or reduce as far as possible, the adverse effects from extractive waste management on health and the environment. The deadline for transposition of the directive by the Member States expired on 1 May 2008. Research indicates that all Member States (EU-27) have experienced transposition problems in terms of 'timing' or 'quality ...

In the aftermath of two major accidents involving the spill of hazardous extractive waste, the Mining Waste Directive 2006/21/EC was adopted at EU level with the aim to prevent, or reduce as far as possible, the adverse effects from extractive waste management on health and the environment. The deadline for transposition of the directive by the Member States expired on 1 May 2008. Research indicates that all Member States (EU-27) have experienced transposition problems in terms of 'timing' or 'quality' or both. It appears that the majority of Member States have adopted the measures needed to implement the provisions of the directive, but the practical implementation of some aspects remains problematic. The quality of available data does not allow for the complete picture of practical implementation of the directive to be fully outlined and assessed. While EU legislation on the management of extractive waste is still relevant to real needs, the levels of effectiveness and efficiency across the EU may vary from one Member State to another. This European Implementation Assessment, which is intended to support the Implementation Report being prepared by European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, makes recommendations for action aimed at improving the identified shortcomings. The study also sheds light on the prospects for extractive waste management in the context of the 'circular economy' concept.

Food Contact Materials - Regulation (EC) 1935/2004

10-05-2016

Food contact materials (FCMs) are widely used in everyday life in the form of food packaging, kitchen utensils, tableware, etc. When put in contact with food, the different materials may behave differently and transfer their constituents to the food. Thus, if ingested in large quantities, FCM chemicals might endanger human health, or change the food itself. Therefore, food contact materials are subject to legally binding rules at EU level, currently laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004 which ...

Food contact materials (FCMs) are widely used in everyday life in the form of food packaging, kitchen utensils, tableware, etc. When put in contact with food, the different materials may behave differently and transfer their constituents to the food. Thus, if ingested in large quantities, FCM chemicals might endanger human health, or change the food itself. Therefore, food contact materials are subject to legally binding rules at EU level, currently laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004 which aims at ensuring FCM safety but also the effective functioning of the internal market in FCM goods. The regulation sets up a general safety requirement applicable to all possible food contact materials and articles, and envisages a possibility for the adoption of specific safety requirements (i.e. further harmonisation at EU level) for seventeen FCMs listed in Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004. So far, specific safety requirements have been adopted only for four FCMs: plastics (including recycled plastics), ceramics, regenerated cellulose and so-called active and intelligent materials. Where specific requirements have not been adopted at EU level, Member States could adopt such measures at national level, which is the case for several widely used FCMs, such as: paper & board, metals & alloys, glass, coatings, silicones, rubbers, printing inks etc. However, as reported by the majority of stakeholders participating in this survey, the lack of specific measures at EU level for some food contact materials/articles negatively impacts the functioning of the internal market for the relevant material/article and its food safety. Stakeholders - across businesses, consumers, environmental and health NGOs, researchers, as well as Member States' competent authorities - are in favour of specific measures at EU level for the FCMs that are not yet harmonised at EU level.

Kommande evenemang

27-09-2021
Turning the tide on cancer: the national parliaments' view on Europe's Cancer Plan
Övrigt -
BECA
27-09-2021
US trade policy
Utfrågning -
INTA
27-09-2021
Consumer protection and automated decision-making tools in a modern economy
Utfrågning -
IMCO

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