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resultat

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Publikationstyp
Politikområde
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Datum

EU certification of aviation security screening equipment

07-07-2019

In 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal sought ‘to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment’. This system was to be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would have ...

In 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation establishing a certification system for aviation security screening equipment. The proposal sought ‘to contribute to the proper functioning of the EU internal market and to increase the global competitiveness of the EU industry by establishing an EU certification system for aviation security equipment’. This system was to be based on EU type-approval and issuance of a certificate of conformity by manufacturers, which would have been valid in all Member States, according to the principle of mutual recognition. Progress on the proposal rapidly reached a stalemate. Consequently, in its 2019 work programme, the Commission announced its intention to withdraw the proposal, noting that there was a common understanding that an EU certification system would be better reached by amending existing implementing legislation based on Regulation (EC) No 300/2008 on common rules in the field of civil aviation security. The proposal was formally withdrawn on 21 June 2019. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Revision of the European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS) Directive

25-04-2019

On 31 May 2017, the Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union. It was presented within the context of the Commission's first 'Europe on the Move' package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport. Tying in with the 2015 energy union strategy and the Commission's 2016 European strategy for low emission mobility, and announced in the 2017 ...

On 31 May 2017, the Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union. It was presented within the context of the Commission's first 'Europe on the Move' package that seeks to modernise mobility and transport. Tying in with the 2015 energy union strategy and the Commission's 2016 European strategy for low emission mobility, and announced in the 2017 Commission work programme, the revision of the European Electronic Tolling Service (EETS) was presented together with the revision of the directive on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures (the Eurovignette Directive). Interinstitutional (trilogue) negotiations concluded on 20 November 2018. The agreed text was formally adopted by Parliament on 14 February 2019 and by Council on 4 March 2019. The final act was then published in the Official Journal on 29 March 2019. Member States now have until 19 October 2021 to apply the directive’s measures in their national laws.

Electronic road toll systems

06-02-2019

In May 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union, which would be a recast of Directive 2004/52/EC. Following the completion of interinstitutional (trilogue) negotiations, which resulted in a provisional agreement on 20 November 2018, the European Parliament is expected to formally adopt the text during its February plenary ...

In May 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a directive on the interoperability of electronic road toll systems and facilitating cross-border exchange of information on the failure to pay road fees in the Union, which would be a recast of Directive 2004/52/EC. Following the completion of interinstitutional (trilogue) negotiations, which resulted in a provisional agreement on 20 November 2018, the European Parliament is expected to formally adopt the text during its February plenary session.

Revision of the European Electronic Road Toll Service

12-10-2017

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 31 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism. Digitisation and connectivity allow tolling without the user having to stop at toll barriers. Electronic tolls are levied by electronic systems that charge passing vehicles at a control point or across the infrastructure network. The vast majority ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment (IA) accompanying the above proposal, submitted on 31 May 2017 and referred to Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism. Digitisation and connectivity allow tolling without the user having to stop at toll barriers. Electronic tolls are levied by electronic systems that charge passing vehicles at a control point or across the infrastructure network. The vast majority require road users to install special equipment – on-board units (OBU) – for which technologies and standards may differ from one Member State to the next. For that reason, Directive 2004/52/EC on interoperability established the framework for a European Electronic Toll Service (EETS), in accordance with which road users could subscribe to a single contract and use a single OBU to pay electronic tolls throughout the EU. The detailed technical issues connected with the directive were set out in Commission Decision 2009/750/EC on the definition of the EETS and its technical elements. The EETS should have been operational for heavy goods vehicles by October 2012 and for other vehicles by October 2014, but the objectives of the legislation remain largely unattained. Some cross-border interoperability has been achieved, but in the majority of Member States it is still the case that only national OBUs can be used to pay tolls. The European Parliament has called for the Commission to consider appropriate legislative measures in the field of interoperability on several occasions, for instance in its 2013 and 2015 resolutions. In 2015, the Commission announced an evaluation of EETS legislation, which was concluded in 2017 with the publishing of the ex-post evaluation report. The Commission included the regulatory fitness (REFIT) revision of Directive 2004/52/EC in its 2017 work programme (CWP) under the new initiatives implementing the energy union strategy and included the initiative in the European strategy for low-emission mobility. Initially, EU road-pricing initiatives, such as the EETS Interoperability Directive and 'Eurovignette' Directive 1999/62/EC on the charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructure, were not focused on contributing to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but with time, this aspect has become more important. The Commission presented its revision of the EETS Interoperability Directive in parallel with the proposal to revise the Eurovignette Directive.

An assessment of the Commission's proposal on privacy and electronic communications

01-06-2017

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, appraises the European Commission’s proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation. The study assesses whether the proposal would ensure that the right to the protection of personal data, the right to respect for private life and communications, and related rights enjoy a high standard of protection. The study also highlights the proposal’s potential benefits ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, appraises the European Commission’s proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation. The study assesses whether the proposal would ensure that the right to the protection of personal data, the right to respect for private life and communications, and related rights enjoy a high standard of protection. The study also highlights the proposal’s potential benefits and drawbacks more generally.

Extern avdelning

Dr. Frederik ZUIDERVEEN BORGESIUS (project leader and editor), Dr. Joris VAN HOBOKEN, Ronan FAHY and Dr. Kristina IRION Max ROZENDAAL

Restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment

04-04-2017

The IA defines in a clear way the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and is based on extensive research conducted by external contractors. However, it omits to explain the sequential process and the underlying assumptions leading to the identification of the four problems analysed, mentioning only the supporting studies. Also, it contains some discrepancies with respect to the supporting studies in terms of terminology and recommendations which are not explained in the IA. A ...

The IA defines in a clear way the problems and the objectives of the proposed initiative, and is based on extensive research conducted by external contractors. However, it omits to explain the sequential process and the underlying assumptions leading to the identification of the four problems analysed, mentioning only the supporting studies. Also, it contains some discrepancies with respect to the supporting studies in terms of terminology and recommendations which are not explained in the IA. A broad range of stakeholders provided valuable data and information that were used in the IA, even though only 40 (out of 300) provided comments and suggestions. The IA seems to make a reasonable case for the preferred options, which are reflected in the legislative proposal, intending to amend four articles of RoHS 2. However, one of these amendments has been proposed without a clear explanation being provided in the IA. The analysis of competitiveness of SMEs appears to be, in general, insufficiently developed or explained.

Review of the ePrivacy Directive

03-02-2017

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging ...

The technological, economic and social landscape has significantly changed since the adoption of Directive 2002/58 on privacy in electronic communications. In spite of targeted amendments adopted in 2009, the current text of the directive does not entirely reflect recent evolutions in the sector and in consumers' habits. Some of the most notable changes in this respect include the entry of new types of players on the market and the widespread usage of internet-based services, such as instant messaging, with a potential impact on the effectiveness of existing ePrivacy rules. In addition, the adoption of the General Data Protection Regulation in 2016 has altered the legislative framework on data protection, possibly calling into question the relevance and continued coherence of the ePrivacy Directive with the new legislation. Evidence collected to evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, coherence, relevance and EU added value of Directive 2002/58, as well as the feedback gathered by the European Commission through targeted workshops, an online public consultation and a Eurobarometer survey, have confirmed the existence of various challenges. These were also raised during a dedicated conference organised by the European Parliament in 2015. In particular, some of the key provisions of the directive have not been fully effective in delivering the intended levels of confidentiality and protection envisaged by the legislator. This is the case of Article 5(3), for instance, on cookies and other techniques to store and access information on users' equipment, a point that was raised on various occasions also by the Members of the European Parliament. Moreover, it appears that some parts of Directive 2002/58 have become technologically obsolete or that better legal approaches have been adopted in the meantime. Finally, an analysis of the implementation of EU ePrivacy rules in the Member States pointed to various degrees of legal fragmentation, the coexistence of different levels of protection across the EU, and a complex governance structure with responsibilities for implementation and enforcement allocated to different types of authorities, at times even within the same country. Overall, this has contributed to a lack of legal certainty and clarity, and the absence of a level playing field across Europe. On the other hand, the EU added value and the overall relevance of having dedicated provisions protecting privacy and ensuring the practical application of Article 7 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, was repeatedly confirmed. Indeed, a modernisation of the current rules is a central component of the EU's digital single market strategy, and is expected to restore and increase citizens' and businesses' trust in the digital environment. On 10 January 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal to repeal Directive 2002/58 and replace it with a regulation to address several of the issues outlined above, to simplify existing rules and to make them future-proof. The co-legislators will now have the task of finding a balance between the various conflicting positions and expectations that have emerged throughout the process leading to the directive's review.

Kommande evenemang

27-10-2020
Hearing on Rebuilding fish stocks in the Mediterranean: next steps
Utfrågning -
PECH
27-10-2020
EPRS online Book Talk | Beyond Christendom - The politics of religion in Europe today
Övrigt -
EPRS
27-10-2020
Study presentation for PECH committee
Övrigt -
PECH

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