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Creative Europe programme 2021-2027

17-06-2021

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The previous programme focused ...

Having considered the possibility of merging the Creative Europe programme with other programmes supporting European values, rights and justice, the European Commission has decided to continue the Creative Europe programme as a stand-alone programme, increasing its budget by 17 %. The only programme focusing exclusively on cultural and creative activities and enterprises, it falls under the 'Cohesion and values' heading of the 2021-2027 multiannual financial framework. The previous programme focused on the economic dimension of the cultural sector and its contribution to job creation and economic growth. Some stakeholders had voiced concern at taking such a strongly economic approach to culture. Under the new programme, the economic dimension is one axis alongside the social dimension, as well as culture's contribution to international relations. The new framework for cultural policy therefore highlights not only the economic dimension of the cultural and creative sectors, but also the role of culture in social cohesion and its relation to creative and artistic freedom and diversity, and freedom and plurality of media. The Parliament, Council and Commission started trilogue negotiations in autumn 2019. After an almost year-long break, the negotiations resumed in the second half of 2020 when the Council, the Commission and the EP reached a common agreement. The new programme was then finally adopted in May 2021, but applies with retroactive effect from 1 January 2021.

Research for CULT Committee - The Situation of Artists and Cultural Workers and the post-COVID-19 Cultural Recovery in the European Union - Background Analysis

01-02-2021

This background analysis on the situation of artists and cultural workers and the post-COVID-19 cultural recovery in the European Union is prepared for the European Parliament. It provides an overview of key characteristics of artists' and cultural workers’ status across Europe, their working conditions, precariousness and career paths. It outlines the justification for specific policy solutions and provides a mapping of key challenges for a European framework for working conditions in the cultural ...

This background analysis on the situation of artists and cultural workers and the post-COVID-19 cultural recovery in the European Union is prepared for the European Parliament. It provides an overview of key characteristics of artists' and cultural workers’ status across Europe, their working conditions, precariousness and career paths. It outlines the justification for specific policy solutions and provides a mapping of key challenges for a European framework for working conditions in the cultural and creative sectors and industries.

Extern avdelning

Dr Mafalda DÂMASO Culture Action Europe: Tere BADIA, Gabriele ROSANA, Kornelia KISS, Sebastiano BERTAGNI, Maya WEISINGER

Research for CULT Committee - The Use of Artificial Intelligence in the Cultural and Creative Sectors

15-05-2020

In this introductory in-depth analysis, we report six key findings on the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the cultural and creative sectors (CCS). Finding 1: AI challenges the creative value-chain in two ways: shifting services performed by humans to algorithms and empowering the individual creator. Finding 2: AI-generated content challenges authorship, ownership and copyright infringement. New exclusive rights on datasets must be designed in order to better incentivise innovation and research ...

In this introductory in-depth analysis, we report six key findings on the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the cultural and creative sectors (CCS). Finding 1: AI challenges the creative value-chain in two ways: shifting services performed by humans to algorithms and empowering the individual creator. Finding 2: AI-generated content challenges authorship, ownership and copyright infringement. New exclusive rights on datasets must be designed in order to better incentivise innovation and research. Finding 3: European cultural institutions have rich datasets of cultural artefacts that could be made accessible to a larger audience. AI has the potential to create rich ways for users to navigate through cultural content. Good practices in AI for cultural heritage accessibility need to be formalised and shared among the European cultural networks. Finding 4: The use of AI for media content brings up issues regarding cultural and linguistic diversity. Public policies and measures are required to prevent discrimination in AI-based distribution platforms. Finding 5: AI governance is centralised, which has an impact in the CCS. Funding instruments are needed to support less-centralised, human-centred AI. Finding 6: The Union supports a rich environment for AI-Art, resulting in the development of critical discourse on technology and AI by the public, which should be sustained in the long run.

Extern avdelning

Baptiste Caramiaux

Employment in the cultural and creative sectors

23-10-2019

Statistical data confirm the continued rise in the contribution of culture and art to the economy and employment in the EU and worldwide. An analysis of labour market data for culture and arts professionals provides an insight into the nature of the employment and livelihood which the sector provides. However, it points to frequent incidence of short-term contracts, part-time jobs and seasonal employment, two or more parallel jobs for people with university diplomas, and this employment situation ...

Statistical data confirm the continued rise in the contribution of culture and art to the economy and employment in the EU and worldwide. An analysis of labour market data for culture and arts professionals provides an insight into the nature of the employment and livelihood which the sector provides. However, it points to frequent incidence of short-term contracts, part-time jobs and seasonal employment, two or more parallel jobs for people with university diplomas, and this employment situation is frequently qualified as precarious. Culture is a specific domain characterised both by its business model, and its underlying nature of activity related to creativity, identity and self-expression. This combination of very material, financial, and transcendental aspects makes for unique employment conditions in this sector, with two divergent requirements: economic results and contribution to self-expression, well-being, social cohesion, and identity. Cultural works are often copyrighted, providing a source of revenue for cultural professionals. Revenue structure in the sector is complex due to the international mobility of cultural professionals and artists. For instance, such revenues are subject to taxes and can result in double taxation or taxation of people who do not reach the minimum threshold and thus lose their income unduly. The number of cultural professionals and artists is growing steadily, while their employment conditions become more and more unstable. This situation spreads to other sectors and needs to be addressed both in terms of social security and benefits, and revenues and taxation aspects. The EU competence in cultural, social and employment policies is limited, consisting of guidance and coordination without any possibility of harmonisation. However, since cultural professionals' EU mobility is sought after and considered important for the preservation of Europe's cultural diversity, the above-mentioned problems need to be addressed at EU level. The European Commission, Council and Parliament are aware of the situation and approach it from an employment and tax perspective. Cultural education policy could help strengthen the demand for cultural services, contributing to better employment and training of professionals in the sector.

EU policies – Delivering for citizens: Industrial policy

28-06-2019

Through its industrial policy, the European Union (EU) has been striving to create conditions conducive to increasing industry growth and competitiveness since 1992. European industry remains a cornerstone of the economy, providing one job out of five, and is responsible for the bulk of EU exports and investment in research and innovation. Today, the aim of EU policy is to enable a successful transition towards digital, knowledge-based, decarbonised and more circular industry in Europe. To achieve ...

Through its industrial policy, the European Union (EU) has been striving to create conditions conducive to increasing industry growth and competitiveness since 1992. European industry remains a cornerstone of the economy, providing one job out of five, and is responsible for the bulk of EU exports and investment in research and innovation. Today, the aim of EU policy is to enable a successful transition towards digital, knowledge-based, decarbonised and more circular industry in Europe. To achieve this goal, the EU supports, coordinates and supplements Member State-level policies and actions, mainly in the areas of research and innovation, SMEs and digital technologies. In a Eurobarometer poll conducted for the European Parliament, more than half of EU citizens expressed support for increased EU action on industrial policy. Despite this, it is still the least understood policy area covered by the poll. Since 2014, efforts have been made in a number of areas, including investment (mainly through the European Fund for Strategic Investment, which supports industrial modernisation); digitalisation (for example setting up a number of research partnerships, or a growing network of digital innovation hubs); financing (making it easier for industry and SMEs to access public markets and attract venture funds); greener industry (for example through the revised 2030 emission targets, or measures on clean mobility); standardisation (bringing together relevant stakeholders to collectively develop and update European standards); and skills (mobilising key stakeholders to close the skills gap and providing an adequate workforce for modern industry). The European Parliament has called for ambitious policies in many of these areas. In the future, EU spending on key areas relevant to industrial policy is expected to rise moderately. The European Commission is proposing to boost the share of EU spending on research, SMEs and key infrastructure, although not as much as Parliament has requested. In the coming years, policies are likely to focus on seeking fairer global competition, stimulating innovation, building digital capacities and increasing the sustainability of European industry. This is an update of an earlier briefing issued in advance of the 2019 European elections.

Creative Europe Programme (2014 to 2020)

26-10-2018

The study provides an up-to-date evaluation of the implementation of the selected smaller and bigger actions within the Creative Europe programme (2014 to 2020) with focus on the European dimension and European added value of the undertaken actions as well as their visibility.

The study provides an up-to-date evaluation of the implementation of the selected smaller and bigger actions within the Creative Europe programme (2014 to 2020) with focus on the European dimension and European added value of the undertaken actions as well as their visibility.

Research for CULT Committee - Mobility of artists and culture professionals: towards a European policy framework

14-09-2018

Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.

Mobility is a social and economic condition of artists and culture professionals and, at the same time, a vector of social and economic development. However, mobility in the cultural and creative sectors is faced with a number of issues that need to be addressed at EU and national levels. The paper provides recommendations for a EU-wide mobility framework which entails both a dedicated mobility scheme and an improved regulatory environment that would facilitate mobility in Europe.

Extern avdelning

KEA European Affairs: Clémentine Daubeuf, Teodora Pletosu, Philippe Kern, Arthur Le Gall

Research for CULT Committee - Creative Europe: Towards the Next Programme Generation

12-06-2018

Creative Europe is a unique programme in Europe, tailored to the needs of the cultural and creative sectors. It is the main programme that contributes to the cultural policy objectives of the EU. The programme targets the right priorities, but its modest budget prevents it from making a substantial impact. The report provides recommendations for a more ambitious future programme, reflecting the richness of European cultural diversity.

Creative Europe is a unique programme in Europe, tailored to the needs of the cultural and creative sectors. It is the main programme that contributes to the cultural policy objectives of the EU. The programme targets the right priorities, but its modest budget prevents it from making a substantial impact. The report provides recommendations for a more ambitious future programme, reflecting the richness of European cultural diversity.

Extern avdelning

KEA: Philippe Kern, Arthur Le Gall, Teodora Pletosu

Creative Europe programme at the halfway point

24-02-2017

Creative Europe is the only European Union programme that directly targets cultural activities. Its mandatory mid-term evaluation by the European Commission is due by the end of 2017. The March I plenary will discuss the European Parliament’s own-initiative report on the programme’s implementation.

Creative Europe is the only European Union programme that directly targets cultural activities. Its mandatory mid-term evaluation by the European Commission is due by the end of 2017. The March I plenary will discuss the European Parliament’s own-initiative report on the programme’s implementation.

Research for CULT Committee - European Strategy for Multilingualism: Benefits and Costs

14-10-2016

This report presents the different results of the research in the economics of languages that deal with the advantages and the disadvantages of multilingualism in the economy, in society and in the institutions of the EU. These results provide a general, albeit admittedly limited, picture of the needs for language policy in the current European multilingual environment. Against this background, we evaluate the relevance of the general goals and the recommendations of the European Strategy for Multilingualism ...

This report presents the different results of the research in the economics of languages that deal with the advantages and the disadvantages of multilingualism in the economy, in society and in the institutions of the EU. These results provide a general, albeit admittedly limited, picture of the needs for language policy in the current European multilingual environment. Against this background, we evaluate the relevance of the general goals and the recommendations of the European Strategy for Multilingualism (ESM). Further, we summarise the available evidence of measures and actions carried out by the Commission to implement the ESM, and, where possible, we present data on their advantages and disadvantages.

Extern avdelning

Michele Gazzola (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany and Institute for Ethnic Studies, Ljubljana, Slovenia)

Kommande evenemang

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
Övrigt -
EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
Övrigt -
EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
Övrigt -
EPRS

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