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Digital Europe programme 2021-2027

21-04-2021

In 2018, under the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027, the Commission put forward a proposal for a programme aimed at building the EU's strategic digital capacities (supercomputing, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and skills) and at facilitating the deployment and uptake of digital technologies across Europe. Following an early second-reading agreement reached on 14 December 2020, Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal at second reading in April, finalising the ...

In 2018, under the new Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) for 2021-2027, the Commission put forward a proposal for a programme aimed at building the EU's strategic digital capacities (supercomputing, cybersecurity, artificial intelligence and skills) and at facilitating the deployment and uptake of digital technologies across Europe. Following an early second-reading agreement reached on 14 December 2020, Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal at second reading in April, finalising the ordinary legislative procedure.

Sustainable and smart mobility strategy – Delivered at local level

20-04-2021

On 9 December 2020, the European Commission put forward a sustainable and smart mobility strategy, outlining its planned steps to transform the European Union (EU) transport system to meet the ambition of the European Green Deal and the objectives of the EU's digital strategy. The strategy aims to rebuild the European transport sector, badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic, making it greener, smarter and more resilient, while leaving no one behind. This is to be achieved by strengthening the existing ...

On 9 December 2020, the European Commission put forward a sustainable and smart mobility strategy, outlining its planned steps to transform the European Union (EU) transport system to meet the ambition of the European Green Deal and the objectives of the EU's digital strategy. The strategy aims to rebuild the European transport sector, badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic, making it greener, smarter and more resilient, while leaving no one behind. This is to be achieved by strengthening the existing rules, proposing new legislation and providing support measures and guidance. The Commission will start to make proposals for the planned measures in 2021. Once agreed by the EU legislators and adopted as new EU rules, these will have to be implemented. While national governments will be expected to align their existing national legislation with the new requirements, the task of putting the new rules into practice will often be managed by public administrations at regional and local level. Cities and regions will have to adapt their existing systems and invest to make transport more sustainable, but also to allow citizens to better combine the available mobility options, enabling them to reduce their daily travel needs while ensuring connectivity and service accessibility. This briefing looks at the policy and other support that the European Commission is providing for local and regional authorities to facilitate the mobility transition. Following established practice, they will be invited to contribute to the design of the individual measures outlined in the strategy. They should also have their say in setting their national priorities for receiving EU financing for the post-coronavirus recovery, as an opportunity to start transforming the transport system from the local level. This Briefing has been drafted following a request from a member of the European Committee of the Regions, in the framework of the Cooperation Agreement between the Parliament and the Committee.

InvestEU programme: The EU's new investment support scheme

30-03-2021

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's ...

The InvestEU programme is a single investment support mechanism for the 2021-2027 period. It brings together various EU financial instruments for internal policies previously supported by different funds and programmes of the EU budget. On 26 March 2021, the InvestEU Regulation entered into force, with retroactive application from 1 January 2021. The EU guarantee, set at €26.2 billion, is expected to mobilise at least €372 billion of investment across the EU (in current prices). In addition, at Parliament's insistence, European Investment Bank legacy portfolios will be consolidated with InvestEU, which could mobilise an extra €35-40 billion in investment. Under the national compartment, Member States are able to allocate amounts to InvestEU from funds under shared management and from the new Recovery and Resilience Facility. Composed of four policy windows (sustainable infrastructure; research, innovation and digitalisation; SMEs; and social investment and skills), InvestEU is designed to contribute to the green transition in various ways, including through investment targets and a horizontal Just Transition Scheme.

Europe's Beating Cancer plan: Quick overview and initial reactions

24-03-2021

On 3 February 2021, the European Commission presented Europe's Beating Cancer plan, slightly delayed on account of the pandemic. The plan is a key European Union (EU) public health initiative and a cornerstone of the European health union process launched in November 2020. Responsibility for health lies primarily with the governments of the individual EU Member States. Europe's Beating Cancer plan sets out actions to support, coordinate or supplement Member States' efforts at every stage of the disease ...

On 3 February 2021, the European Commission presented Europe's Beating Cancer plan, slightly delayed on account of the pandemic. The plan is a key European Union (EU) public health initiative and a cornerstone of the European health union process launched in November 2020. Responsibility for health lies primarily with the governments of the individual EU Member States. Europe's Beating Cancer plan sets out actions to support, coordinate or supplement Member States' efforts at every stage of the disease: from prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment, to an improved quality of life for cancer patients and survivors. Cross-cutting themes include research and innovation, digital and personalised medicine, and action to reduce cancer inequalities across the EU. A particular focus will be on childhood cancers. The plan consists of 10 flagship initiatives and 32 supporting actions, to be rolled out over the coming years. Implementation will be monitored by means of a roadmap and progress indicators, and the Commission will establish an EU cancer plan implementation group. With a €4 billion budget, the plan will make use of all available funding instruments, including the new EU4Health programme, Horizon Europe, and the Digital Europe programme. EU institutional actors and public and private stakeholders have widely commented on Europe's Beating Cancer plan. While non-governmental organisations and industry associations broadly welcome the plan and its ambition, some have criticised specific elements. The European Parliament's Special Committee on Cancer is working on an own-initiative report that will be Parliament's contribution to Europe's Beating Cancer plan. Health and Food Safety Commissioner Stella Kyriakides has stressed that Parliament and its special committee has played an important role in shaping the plan, and will also be instrumental during its implementation.

Plenary round-up – March I 2021

12-03-2021

The highlight of the March I 2021 plenary session was the official signature of the Joint Declaration on the Conference on the Future of Europe, allowing the Conference's work finally to get under way. Another important point was the celebration of International Women's Day, which was held just before the start of the session, with Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States of America, and Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand, addressing the plenary in video messages, and Ursula ...

The highlight of the March I 2021 plenary session was the official signature of the Joint Declaration on the Conference on the Future of Europe, allowing the Conference's work finally to get under way. Another important point was the celebration of International Women's Day, which was held just before the start of the session, with Kamala Harris, Vice President of the United States of America, and Jacinda Ardern, Prime Minister of New Zealand, addressing the plenary in video messages, and Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, also participating, in the chamber. The main debates held during the session concerned the economic impact of the Covid 19 pandemic – focusing on investment, competitiveness and skills, as well as the proposed action plan for the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights, in preparation for the Social Summit in Porto in May. Members also discussed the application of the rule of law conditionality mechanism, respect for the partnership principle in the preparation and implementation of national recovery and resilience plans, and ensuring good governance of the expenditure of EU funding. Proposals on the European Semester annual strategies, corporate due diligence and corporate accountability, as well as the InvestEU and EU4Health programmes, were also debated and voted. Parliament also adopted a resolution declaring the EU an LGBTIQ Freedom Zone. Members debated government attempts to silence free media in Poland, Hungary and Slovenia. Debates were held on reforming the EU policy framework to end tax avoidance in the EU following the OpenLux revelations. Members debated statements by High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice-President of the Commission, Josep Borell, on the current political situation in Georgia and on the continuing conflict in Syria.

Research for REGI Committee-Climate Spending in EU Cohesion Policy: State of Play and Prospects

21-12-2020

With more than EUR 55 billion in planned investments, Cohesion Policy seeks to make a significant contribution to the EU´s overall climate-related spending target of 20% in the 2014-2020 period. There are concrete achievements in a number of areas such as flood and forest fire protection. However, evidence also suggests that Cohesion Policy is at risk of missing some of its targets, including on energy efficiency, renewables and greenhouse gas emissions. Cohesion policy has also continued to provide ...

With more than EUR 55 billion in planned investments, Cohesion Policy seeks to make a significant contribution to the EU´s overall climate-related spending target of 20% in the 2014-2020 period. There are concrete achievements in a number of areas such as flood and forest fire protection. However, evidence also suggests that Cohesion Policy is at risk of missing some of its targets, including on energy efficiency, renewables and greenhouse gas emissions. Cohesion policy has also continued to provide support to fossil fuels and biomass, which may hinder the EU’s long-term path to climate neutrality. Moreover, the Commission’s current approach to tracking climate-related expenditure in Cohesion Policy has shortcomings. There is a need for a transparent and meaningful methodology, with a stronger focus on performance and results, as repeatedly highlighted by Parliament. The climate spending target is set to increase to at least 30% under the EU’s next Multi-Annual Financial Framework (MFF) and the Recovery Instrument (Next Generation EU). In the period 2021-2027, Cohesion Policy is expected to place even more emphasis on climate and environment-related issues in line with the objectives of the European Green Deal.

REACT-EU recovery assistance

10-12-2020

In light of the coronavirus pandemic, the European Commission proposed the REACT-EU package for the regions most hit by the crisis. It will mobilise additional resources of €47.5 billion and offer flexibility for Member States to address the coronavirus-related challenges using EU funds. It also complements two previous Coronavirus Response Investment Initiatives delivered through cohesion policy. The European Parliament is expected to vote during its December plenary session to adopt its first-reading ...

In light of the coronavirus pandemic, the European Commission proposed the REACT-EU package for the regions most hit by the crisis. It will mobilise additional resources of €47.5 billion and offer flexibility for Member States to address the coronavirus-related challenges using EU funds. It also complements two previous Coronavirus Response Investment Initiatives delivered through cohesion policy. The European Parliament is expected to vote during its December plenary session to adopt its first-reading position on the proposed regulation, confirming the compromise political agreement reached with the Council in November.

Sustainable Europe Investment Plan

05-11-2020

During its November I plenary session, Parliament is scheduled to vote on an own-initiative report on how to finance the European Green Deal. The text welcomes the Sustainable Europe Investment Plan as central to the success of the green transition and calls for a number of improvements.

During its November I plenary session, Parliament is scheduled to vote on an own-initiative report on how to finance the European Green Deal. The text welcomes the Sustainable Europe Investment Plan as central to the success of the green transition and calls for a number of improvements.

Tourism sector: EU funding to cope with the coronavirus crisis

06-10-2020

Tourism has been severely hit by the coronavirus crisis. At the peak of the pandemic, most EU Member States introduced measures restricting free movement across borders. Tourism businesses were among the last to be allowed to resume activities, and have had to apply strict health protocols and containment measures, meaning that they are operating at restricted capacity with increased costs. Most tourist destinations have seen a huge drop in tourist numbers and their season curtailed. Many Member ...

Tourism has been severely hit by the coronavirus crisis. At the peak of the pandemic, most EU Member States introduced measures restricting free movement across borders. Tourism businesses were among the last to be allowed to resume activities, and have had to apply strict health protocols and containment measures, meaning that they are operating at restricted capacity with increased costs. Most tourist destinations have seen a huge drop in tourist numbers and their season curtailed. Many Member States have recently begun to impose new confinement and quarantine measures and travel restrictions.

What Role for the European Semester in the recovery plan?

06-10-2020

Accessing funds of the EU’s Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF) depends on detailed national Recovery and Resilience Plans (RRPs) being agreed upon, and projects meeting implementation milestones. The RRPs will be embedded in the European Semester, the EU’s framework for economic policy coordination. This paper suggests that there are risks to the implementation of the RRPs, and/or to an objective evaluation of their progress. While the Treaty specifies that the execution of economic policy coordination ...

Accessing funds of the EU’s Recovery and Resilience Facility (RRF) depends on detailed national Recovery and Resilience Plans (RRPs) being agreed upon, and projects meeting implementation milestones. The RRPs will be embedded in the European Semester, the EU’s framework for economic policy coordination. This paper suggests that there are risks to the implementation of the RRPs, and/or to an objective evaluation of their progress. While the Treaty specifies that the execution of economic policy coordination shall be done by the Member States within the Council, the involvement of the European Parliament would potentially increase transparency and accountability for national policy makers (as well as the Commission and Council), which could improve project delivery and thus benefit the recovery.

Extern avdelning

Thomas Wieser

Kommande evenemang

07-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: What is the future of (European) sovereignty?
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EPRS
08-09-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: Statistics, Data and Trust: Why figures matter [...]
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EPRS
21-09-2021
EPRS online Book Talk with David Harley: Matters of Record: Inside European Politics
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EPRS

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