2

resultat

Ord
Publikationstyp
Politikområde
Författare
Datum

Research for AGRI Committee - The Interactions between the EU's External Action and the Common Agricultural Policy

07-07-2016

The CAP has been strongly influenced by the EU’s External Actions. The various Enlargements, and trade policies to favour its neighbours to both the East and South, and for its former colonies, have left their mark. However it is external pressures through the GATT/WTO that have had the most defining effect. Current pressures stem from a new generation of Free Trade agreements, the need to reduce agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions, and to respond to Brexit.

The CAP has been strongly influenced by the EU’s External Actions. The various Enlargements, and trade policies to favour its neighbours to both the East and South, and for its former colonies, have left their mark. However it is external pressures through the GATT/WTO that have had the most defining effect. Current pressures stem from a new generation of Free Trade agreements, the need to reduce agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions, and to respond to Brexit.

Extern avdelning

Alan SWINBANK (School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, the UK)

African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Countries' Position on Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAS)

08-04-2014

After twelve years, Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) negotiations between African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and the EU continue to drag on, as many contentious issues remain pending. The decision by the EU to remove their unilateral trade preferences by 1 October 2014 for countries that have not signed or ratified the EPAs is now creating tremendous pressure and tension in various countries and subregions. In particular, African countries are caught in the dilemma of losing their ...

After twelve years, Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) negotiations between African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and the EU continue to drag on, as many contentious issues remain pending. The decision by the EU to remove their unilateral trade preferences by 1 October 2014 for countries that have not signed or ratified the EPAs is now creating tremendous pressure and tension in various countries and subregions. In particular, African countries are caught in the dilemma of losing their preferential market access for the few products they export to the EU if they do not sign the EPAs, versus their longer-term development prospects if they do sign the EPAs. The threats presented by EPAs as articulated by many stakeholders include: significant tariff revenue losses, loss in policy space and threats to local industries, unemployment, serious disruption of existing or planned customs unions and the displacement of existing regional trade and regional production capacities. Several alternatives to the EPAs have been proposed which could be WTO-compatible and which the EU already provides to some other countries. Options could include: improving the EU's Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) schemes by, for instance, giving all countries in ‘LDC customs unions’ Everything But Arms (EBA) treatment, or improving the EU's GSP+ scheme. Alternatively, the EU could demand a waiver from WTO members for specific developing country regions, as the US has successfully done.

Extern avdelning

Aileen Kwa, Peter Lunenborg, and Wase Musonge (South Centre, Geneva, Switzerland)

Kommande evenemang

25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Utfrågning -
FEMM
26-01-2021
Public hearing on Co-management of EU fisheries at local level
Utfrågning -
PECH
26-01-2021
The impact of Brexit on the level playing field in the area of taxation
Utfrågning -
FISC

Partner