12

resultat

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Publikationstyp
Politikområde
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Datum

Sustainable finance – EU taxonomy: A framework to facilitate sustainable investment

27-07-2020

In March 2018, the European Commission presented an action plan on sustainable finance, in order to facilitate investments in sustainable projects and assets across the EU. In May 2018, the Commission put forward a package of three proposals, including measures to create a sustainable taxonomy for the EU; provide clarity on how environmental, social and governance factors can be taken into account for investment decisions; and establish low-carbon benchmarks. The first proposal focuses on establishing ...

In March 2018, the European Commission presented an action plan on sustainable finance, in order to facilitate investments in sustainable projects and assets across the EU. In May 2018, the Commission put forward a package of three proposals, including measures to create a sustainable taxonomy for the EU; provide clarity on how environmental, social and governance factors can be taken into account for investment decisions; and establish low-carbon benchmarks. The first proposal focuses on establishing a common language for sustainable finance (e.g. a unified EU classification system, or taxonomy) through a framework of uniform criteria, as a way to determine whether a given economic activity is environmentally sustainable. On 11 March 2019, the ECON-ENVI joint committee adopted a report on the Commission proposal, calling for a number of changes. On 28 March 2019, the Parliament adopted its position at first reading. After interinstitutional negotiations, on 17 June 2020, the Parliament adopted the compromise text at second reading. The final act was published in the Official Journal on 22 June, and applies as of 12 July although certain provisions apply only as of January 2022 or January 2023. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

An EU framework to facilitate investments in environmentally sustainable economic activities

12-04-2019

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposals for three regulations on: establishing a framework to facilitate sustainable investment disclosures relating to sustainable investments and sustainability risks; and on introducing two new categories of carbon benchmarks in the (benchmark) Regulation (EU) 2016/1011. The legislative package on sustainable finance deals with technical and inherently complex issues; ...

This initial appraisal assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's impact assessment accompanying its proposals for three regulations on: establishing a framework to facilitate sustainable investment disclosures relating to sustainable investments and sustainability risks; and on introducing two new categories of carbon benchmarks in the (benchmark) Regulation (EU) 2016/1011. The legislative package on sustainable finance deals with technical and inherently complex issues; it is therefore not surprising that the IA accompanying it reflects such a complexity, which is not always dealt with in a clear and immediately understandable way. This might also explain the double negative opinions, unusually followed in this case by a positive opinion with reservations issued by the Commission's Regulatory Scrutiny Board (RSB). The consequences of the two identified problems (lack of incentives to consider ESG factors and high search costs faced by end-investors), and how they would evolve without EU action, are described in a satisfactory way, as well as their underlying drivers. As required, the IA identifies general and specific objectives, but no operational objectives that would have informed about how the preferred options are expected to operate in practice. This is very likely due to the fact the operational aspects of the proposals are envisaged to be defined, and analytically developed, by subsequent delegated acts. The IA's preferred options are selected after considering both a non-legislative and a regulatory approach, although two of them contains some aspects that are not entirely clear. As regards its scope, the IA has only partially succeeded in explaining the impacts considered in an entirely satisfactory way. The IA does not include an analysis of competitiveness nor an analysis of impacts, if any, on SMEs. The evidence included in the IA provides ample and detailed insights into the issues considered and some methodological limitations, regarding the proposal on low carbon and positive carbon impact benchmarks are acknowledged in the IA. The Commission has consulted extensively a broad range of stakeholders, whose views have been satisfactorily reported in the IA or in a separate document containing the results of the second open public consultation. Overall, the IA appears to have addressed the majority of the improvements requested by the RSB. Finally, the legislative proposals seem to be consistent with the analysis carried out in the IA.

A framework to facilitate sustainable investment

20-03-2019

In May 2018, the Commission submitted a proposal to establish a common framework to facilitate sustainable investment. The proposal would launch a unified EU classification system to help determine whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. Under the Parliament's joint committee procedure, the ECON and ENVI committees have jointly adopted a report, expected to be voted in plenary in March.

In May 2018, the Commission submitted a proposal to establish a common framework to facilitate sustainable investment. The proposal would launch a unified EU classification system to help determine whether an economic activity is environmentally sustainable. Under the Parliament's joint committee procedure, the ECON and ENVI committees have jointly adopted a report, expected to be voted in plenary in March.

EYE 2016 – 360° strategy: Moving things around in a circle

28-04-2016

Unlike a traditional linear economy based on a 'take-make-consume-throw away' pattern, a circular economy is based on sharing, leasing, reusing, repairing, refurbishing and recycling in an almost closed loop. Moving towards a circular economy could deliver benefits but also poses challenges. In 2015, the European Commission presented a circular economy package seeking to enable a transition to this new model, in particular by updating EU waste policy. This note has been prepared for the European ...

Unlike a traditional linear economy based on a 'take-make-consume-throw away' pattern, a circular economy is based on sharing, leasing, reusing, repairing, refurbishing and recycling in an almost closed loop. Moving towards a circular economy could deliver benefits but also poses challenges. In 2015, the European Commission presented a circular economy package seeking to enable a transition to this new model, in particular by updating EU waste policy. This note has been prepared for the European Youth Event, taking place in Strasbourg in May 2016. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Curbing the use of lightweight plastic carrier bags

20-04-2015

Europeans use about 99 billion plastic carrier bags every year. Some of these are dropped as litter, ending up in the environment, where plastics accumulate and harm wildlife. An 'early second reading' trilogue agreement was reached on the Commission's proposal in November 2014. Council approved the text in March 2015; the vote in Parliament is scheduled for the April II plenary.

Europeans use about 99 billion plastic carrier bags every year. Some of these are dropped as litter, ending up in the environment, where plastics accumulate and harm wildlife. An 'early second reading' trilogue agreement was reached on the Commission's proposal in November 2014. Council approved the text in March 2015; the vote in Parliament is scheduled for the April II plenary.

Ecosystem services: Valuing our natural capital

11-03-2015

The concept of ecosystem services providing direct and indirect contributions to human wellbeing has been developed since the 1990s as a way to improve the effectiveness of biodiversity-protection policies. Ecosystem services can be categorised in four broad types: provisioning, regulating, cultural and habitat services. The status of most ecosystem services across the EU is either degraded or mixed, although some are showing improvement. A global initiative on the economics of ecosystems and biodiversity ...

The concept of ecosystem services providing direct and indirect contributions to human wellbeing has been developed since the 1990s as a way to improve the effectiveness of biodiversity-protection policies. Ecosystem services can be categorised in four broad types: provisioning, regulating, cultural and habitat services. The status of most ecosystem services across the EU is either degraded or mixed, although some are showing improvement. A global initiative on the economics of ecosystems and biodiversity, which started in 2007, has set a framework for valuing ecosystem services. The EU has launched a process aimed at increasing the knowledge base related to ecosystem services, with a view to mapping and assessing ecosystems and their services in the Member States. Economic valuation of ecosystem services has made great progress over the past 25 years, although it is still largely based on approximations and incomplete knowledge. The valuation of ecosystem services can contribute to better-informed decision-making and market-based mechanisms promoting biodiversity protection (as in the case of schemes for payment for ecosystem services). However such cases are not widespread. European Commission estimates show that the Natura 2000 network provides services worth between €200 and €300 billion per year. Parliament has consistently called for ecosystem services to be an essential element of biodiversity protection.

Reform of the EU carbon market - From backloading to the market stability reserve

07-11-2014

The EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) aims to achieve cost-efficient reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a market for trading emission allowances. The amount of available allowances is fixed in advance, in line with the EU's GHG reduction targets.

The EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) aims to achieve cost-efficient reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a market for trading emission allowances. The amount of available allowances is fixed in advance, in line with the EU's GHG reduction targets.

Reducing CO2 emissions from new cars

20-02-2014

Parliament and Council agreed modalities for reaching a CO2 emissions target of 95 g/km for new passenger cars by the end of 2020. The agreement aims at maintaining the EU's ambitious climate policies while addressing the car industry's concerns over jobs and competiveness.

Parliament and Council agreed modalities for reaching a CO2 emissions target of 95 g/km for new passenger cars by the end of 2020. The agreement aims at maintaining the EU's ambitious climate policies while addressing the car industry's concerns over jobs and competiveness.

Lightweight Plastic Carrier Bags: Initial Appraisal of the Commission's Impact Assessment

15-01-2014

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment accompanying its proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste to reduce the consumption of lightweight plastic carrier bags (COM (2013) 761 final, submitted on 4 November 2013. It analyses whether the principal criteria laid down in the Commission’s own Impact Assessment Guidelines, as ...

This note seeks to provide an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the European Commission's Impact Assessment accompanying its proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste to reduce the consumption of lightweight plastic carrier bags (COM (2013) 761 final, submitted on 4 November 2013. It analyses whether the principal criteria laid down in the Commission’s own Impact Assessment Guidelines, as well as additional factors identified by the Parliament in its Impact Assessment Handbook, appear to be met by the IA. It does not attempt to deal with the substance of the proposal. It is drafted for informational and background purposes to assist the relevant parliamentary committee and Members more widely in their work.

Assessing effects of projects on the environment

03-10-2013

For more than 25 years, environmental impact assessments (EIAs) have been required for projects likely to have a significant impact on the environment. A revision of the EIA Directive aims to correct shortcomings and to simplify and harmonise the assessment process.

For more than 25 years, environmental impact assessments (EIAs) have been required for projects likely to have a significant impact on the environment. A revision of the EIA Directive aims to correct shortcomings and to simplify and harmonise the assessment process.

Kommande evenemang

20-01-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable with the World Bank: Where next for the global economy
Övrigt -
EPRS
25-01-2021
Public Hearing on "Gender aspects of precarious work"
Utfrågning -
FEMM
27-01-2021
Public hearing on AI and Green Deal
Utfrågning -
AIDA

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