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Access to justice in environmental matters

12-05-2021

During the May plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on a report adopted by its Environment Committee, on a proposal aimed at ensuring EU compliance with its obligations as a party to the 1998 Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters.

During the May plenary session, Parliament is due to vote on a report adopted by its Environment Committee, on a proposal aimed at ensuring EU compliance with its obligations as a party to the 1998 Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters.

Access to justice in environmental matters: Amending the Aarhus Regulation

12-05-2021

The European Union is party to the Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters. The Aarhus Regulation applies the Convention's provisions to EU institutions and bodies. In 2017, the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee, reviewing implementation by the parties, found that the EU fails to comply with its obligations under Article 9, paragraphs 3 and 4 of the convention concerning access to justice by members of ...

The European Union is party to the Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters. The Aarhus Regulation applies the Convention's provisions to EU institutions and bodies. In 2017, the Aarhus Convention Compliance Committee, reviewing implementation by the parties, found that the EU fails to comply with its obligations under Article 9, paragraphs 3 and 4 of the convention concerning access to justice by members of the public. To address this non-compliance issue, on 14 October 2020 the European Commission put forward a legislative proposal to amend the Aarhus Regulation, triggering mixed reactions from stakeholders. The Council reached a general approach on the file on 17 December 2020. Parliament’s Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety adopted its report on 23 April 2021. The report is now scheduled for a vote during the May 2021 plenary session. This vote would set Parliament’s position for negotiations with the Council. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

The impact of teleworking and digital work on workers and society

06-05-2021

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy ...

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy and Romania.

Extern avdelning

Manuela SAMEK LODOVICI et al.

The six policy priorities of the von der Leyen Commission: State of play in spring 2021

03-05-2021

This EPRS paper analyses progress in attaining the policy agenda set out by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, and her College of Commissioners when they took office in December 2019. It looks in particular at the state of play in respect of delivery on the six key priorities asserted at that time and at how they have since been affected by the impact of the coronavirus crisis. The evidence so far suggests that, rather than undermine their original agenda or knock it badly ...

This EPRS paper analyses progress in attaining the policy agenda set out by Ursula von der Leyen, President of the European Commission, and her College of Commissioners when they took office in December 2019. It looks in particular at the state of play in respect of delivery on the six key priorities asserted at that time and at how they have since been affected by the impact of the coronavirus crisis. The evidence so far suggests that, rather than undermine their original agenda or knock it badly off course, the Commission has been able to use the momentum of events to assert the increased relevance of their priorities – especially in the climate action and digital fields – and to operationalise them further through the €750 billion 'Next Generation EU' (NGEU) recovery fund. Concretely, EPRS finds that of the nearly 400 legislative and non-legislative initiatives foreshadowed by the von der Leyen Commission on taking office or since (397), almost half have already been submitted (192). Of these, one in five has already been adopted (43), while the great majority of the remainder are either proceeding normally in the legislative process (97) or are close to adoption (26). Conversely, a certain number of proposals are proceeding very slowly or are currently blocked (26).

President Biden's climate summit

03-05-2021

On 22 and 23 April 2021, United States (US) President Joe Biden convened a virtual summit of 40 world leaders in a bid to galvanise global efforts to address the climate crisis. There he announced new targets of cutting US net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 'between 26 and 28 %' by 2025, and by 'between 50 and 52 %' by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. Biden also announced initiatives to help developing countries decarbonise, and encouraged other countries to match US ambition. The summit, one ...

On 22 and 23 April 2021, United States (US) President Joe Biden convened a virtual summit of 40 world leaders in a bid to galvanise global efforts to address the climate crisis. There he announced new targets of cutting US net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 'between 26 and 28 %' by 2025, and by 'between 50 and 52 %' by 2030, compared with 2005 levels. Biden also announced initiatives to help developing countries decarbonise, and encouraged other countries to match US ambition. The summit, one of a number of events leading up to the (delayed) 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow (United Kingdom) in November 2021, prompted several other countries to pledge new targets. The EU has welcomed the new US targets, but questions remain about their level of ambition and feasibility.

Matching priorities and resources in the EU budget: Climate action, migration and borders

03-05-2021

Over the past two decades, the European Union (EU) has been entrusted with a growing number of objectives and responsibilities. However, ensuring financing of related activities through the EU budget has often proven problematic, as this has long been capped at around 1 % of the Union's gross national income (GNI). During the preparation of the post-2020 EU multiannual financial framework (MFF), climate action, migration and border management were identified among the emerging priorities that required ...

Over the past two decades, the European Union (EU) has been entrusted with a growing number of objectives and responsibilities. However, ensuring financing of related activities through the EU budget has often proven problematic, as this has long been capped at around 1 % of the Union's gross national income (GNI). During the preparation of the post-2020 EU multiannual financial framework (MFF), climate action, migration and border management were identified among the emerging priorities that required increased joint action and funding. The agreement on EU finances for 2021 to 2027 provides for a significant relative increase in the financial resources devoted to these policy areas. In absolute figures, the reinforcements are stronger for climate action than for migration and borders. Underpinned by the European Green Deal strategy, climate action will receive the bulk of its resources through the incorporation of climate considerations and objectives across all relevant EU funding instruments (climate mainstreaming). Next Generation EU (NGEU), the temporary instrument to aid recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, will play a major role in the boost to climate-relevant resources. In total, these could amount to some €550 billion (in 2018 prices, corresponding to 30 % of total MFF and NGEU resources). For the first time, migration and border management have a dedicated heading, accounting for 2.1 % of MFF resources. Among other activities, additional allocations will contribute to the agreed reinforcement of the European Border and Coast Guard Agency. Opinion surveys show that respondents see climate change and migration among the main global challenges for the EU, but there are gaps between perceptions and expectations of the role of the EU budget in these two domains. The European Parliament, which is a strong advocate of a robust EU budget commensurate with the Union's responsibilities, managed to secure additional resources for instruments relevant to both groups of policies, as well as the enhancement of the climate mainstreaming methodology. The Parliament plays a key role in shaping and scrutinising how the funding allocated to the policy areas is implemented. Other measures to reinforce the EU budget's capacity to deliver in the areas of climate action, migration and borders seek to improve synergies between budgetary instruments.

The impact of teleworking and digital work on workers and society

30-04-2021

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy ...

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy and Romania.

Extern avdelning

Manuela SAMEK LODOVICI et al.

Climate action in Belgium: Latest state of play

29-04-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Belgian climate and energy policy is a combined effort of the Flemish, Walloon and Brussels Capital regions. Belgium accounts for 3.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) to cover the 2021-2030 period. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Belgian climate and energy policy is a combined effort of the Flemish, Walloon and Brussels Capital regions. Belgium accounts for 3.3 % of total EU greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. The carbon intensity of Belgium's economy is slightly lower than the EU average and has mirrored the decreasing EU trend closely since 2005. Emissions from energy industries have fell by almost 30 % between 2005 and 2019, with a 2.9 percentage point reduction for total emissions. Waste management was the sector with the biggest percentage reduction (55 % or 1.7 MtCO2e) in emissions since 2005. Transport and agriculture were the sectors with the lowest reduction. Under EU effort-sharing legislation, Belgium was aiming to reduce its emissions by 15 % by 2020, compared with 2005, and in 2019 was on track to achieving the target. Belgium reached a 9.9 % share of renewable energy sources in 2019. Its ambition to reach its 2030 target of a 17.5 % share focused mainly on wind and photovoltaic energy, biofuels and the use of waste heat. Measures to achieve the energy efficiency targets are focused on the building and transport sectors. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Spain: Latest state of play

29-04-2021

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Spain accounts for 9 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2019, the country reduced emissions by 27 %, performing better than the EU average. The carbon intensity of the Spanish economy is slightly below the EU average. The transport ...

The EU's binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment of each NECP. Spain accounts for 9 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 2005 and 2019, the country reduced emissions by 27 %, performing better than the EU average. The carbon intensity of the Spanish economy is slightly below the EU average. The transport sector is the largest emitter in the country, generating 27 % of emissions, followed by the energy industry with a share of 16 % of emissions. The energy sector cut emissions by 57 % during the 2005-2019 period, strongly contributing to the country's total emission reduction. Under the EU effort-sharing regulation, Spain has committed to reducing non-ETS emissions by 26 % by 2030 (compared with 2005) and plans to surpass this target. Looking forward to 2030, Spain has considerably increased its level of ambition for the energy transition, moving from a 2020 target of a 20 % share of renewable energy in the energy mix to a 2030 target of 42 %. The country plans to focus primarily on the deployment of solar and wind power. The proposed measures are expected to generate energy efficiency improvements of over 39 %. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Climate action in Ireland: Latest state of play

29-04-2021

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Ireland submitted its NECP in mid-2019. Ireland generates 1.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. With a low share of energy-intensive industry, Ireland's carbon intensity ...

The EU binding climate and energy legislation for 2030 requires Member States to adopt national energy and climate plans (NECPs) covering the period 2021 to 2030. In October 2020, the European Commission published an assessment for each NECP. Ireland submitted its NECP in mid-2019. Ireland generates 1.7 % of the EU's total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and has reduced emissions at a slower pace than the EU average since 2005. With a low share of energy-intensive industry, Ireland's carbon intensity, relative to GDP, is among the lowest in the Union, with a higher than average decrease. Currently, the agricultural sector accounts for the majority of Ireland's emissions at 31 %, a 4.3 % increase since 2005. Whereas energy industries, manufacturing and industrial processes traditionally account for the majority of countries' emissions, in Ireland they account for only 28 % combined and have together reduced their emissions by 33 % since 2005. Ireland exceeded its allocations under EU effort-sharing legislation for 2020 and also for 2019 (by 15 %). Ireland intends to use effort sharing flexibilities to reach the 2030 target of a 30 % reduction relative to 2005. Ireland achieved a 12 % share of renewable energy sources (RES) in 2019. The country's 2030 target of a 34 % share is focused mainly on wind, with some solar and biomass, with a renewable energy (RE) in electricity target of 70 % by 2030. Energy efficiency measures centre on building stock, smart metering and support measures for low carbon heating and energy retrofits for industry and households. This briefing is one in a series covering all EU Member States.

Kommande evenemang

19-05-2021
EPRS online policy roundtable: The European elections, two years on [...]
Övrigt -
EPRS
25-05-2021
How can technology help in reducing fraud and making tax compliance simpler?
Utfrågning -
FISC
25-05-2021
AIDA - EMPL Public Hearing on AI and the labour market
Utfrågning -
AIDA EMPL

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