ThinkTank logo Beiträge zu neuen EU-Rechtsvorschriften
Veröffentlicht am 07-05-2021

National ratification of the Own Resources Decision: State of play on 5 May 2021

07-05-2021

The Own Resources Decision (ORD) establishes how the EU budget is financed. Its entry into force requires approval by all EU Member States according to their constitutional requirements. In a majority of Member States, national parliaments are responsible for ratifying the decision. In the others, the government alone decides on the approval. Completion of the ratification procedure by all Member States has generally required more than two years. However, there is a greater sense of urgency for the ...

The Own Resources Decision (ORD) establishes how the EU budget is financed. Its entry into force requires approval by all EU Member States according to their constitutional requirements. In a majority of Member States, national parliaments are responsible for ratifying the decision. In the others, the government alone decides on the approval. Completion of the ratification procedure by all Member States has generally required more than two years. However, there is a greater sense of urgency for the ORD adopted by the Council in December 2020, since its entry into force is a pre-condition for the launch of the Next Generation EU (NGEU) recovery instrument. The objective is to complete the ratification procedure before summer 2021, with a view to ensuring the timely launch of NGEU. As of 5 May, 19 Member States have ratified the ORD. The ratification procedure is still ongoing in Austria, Estonia, Finland, Hungary, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland and Romania. This is an update of a Briefing published on 22 March 2021.

Conference on the Future of Europe

07-05-2021

After many debates and statements of principle in recent years, the time for a more structured discussion on the future of Europe's development has arrived. The Conference on the Future of Europe, announced by the Commission's President Ursula von der Leyen in her inaugural address, is set to start after a long period of standstill owing not only to changed priorities brought by the coronavirus pandemic, but also to lengthy negotiations among the institutions. The aim of the conference is to debate ...

After many debates and statements of principle in recent years, the time for a more structured discussion on the future of Europe's development has arrived. The Conference on the Future of Europe, announced by the Commission's President Ursula von der Leyen in her inaugural address, is set to start after a long period of standstill owing not only to changed priorities brought by the coronavirus pandemic, but also to lengthy negotiations among the institutions. The aim of the conference is to debate how the EU should develop in the future, identify where it is rising to the challenges of current times, and enhance those areas that need reform or strengthening. A key aspect of this initiative is to bring the public closer to the EU institutions, listen to people's concerns, involve them directly in the process of the Conference and provide an adequate and meaningful response. In this respect, the ambition is to set up pan-European forums for discussion, for the first time ever, where citizens of all Member States can debate the EU's priorities and make recommendations, to be taken into account by the political-institutional powers that be and, ideally, translated into practical measures. The pandemic hit as the preparation of the conference was just beginning and inevitably caused a delay. In March 2021, the European Parliament, the Council of the EU and the European Commission agreed on a joint declaration, laying down the common rules and principles governing the conference. It was agreed that the leadership of the conference would be shared by the three institutions, with the conference chaired jointly by their three presidents. The Conference on the Future of Europe has all the prerequisites to be an excellent opportunity to engage in a more structured debate between institutions and citizens, and arrive at concrete proposals to improve the way the EU works, in terms not only of institutional dynamics, but also of policies. Some have cautioned however that the initiative must be conducted with the utmost care, in particular as regards the follow-up, so that it remains a meaningful endeavour. This is an updated edition of a Briefing from December 2019.

European Pillar of Social Rights: Gothenburg, Porto and beyond

07-05-2021

The proclamation of the European Pillar of Social Rights (social pillar) by the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council in November 2017 was the fourth major attempt to strengthen the social dimension of the European Union since its inception. The social pillar is to be the fifth pillar of the economic and monetary union. It is to serve as a compass for updating the EU's welfare states and labour markets to the new realities of life and work in the 21st century. Its holistic ...

The proclamation of the European Pillar of Social Rights (social pillar) by the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Council in November 2017 was the fourth major attempt to strengthen the social dimension of the European Union since its inception. The social pillar is to be the fifth pillar of the economic and monetary union. It is to serve as a compass for updating the EU's welfare states and labour markets to the new realities of life and work in the 21st century. Its holistic approach puts upward social convergence at its centre and can help to put economic and social considerations and rights across EU policies on a more equal footing. Its implementation has mainly been the task of the Member States in strong collaboration with the social partners and with the support of the European Union. The social pillar's very broad interpretation of the social dimension, pointing beyond social and employment policies, means that it has been regarded by some simply as the starting point for new initiatives in a number of policy fields, and by others as a potential game-changer that can bring about a genuinely new policy dynamic around the EU's social dimension. The new action plan on the further implementation of the social pillar's principles continues along this complex path. It also proposes three new headline targets and the redesign of the social scoreboard to make monitoring of the implementation process more detailed and accurate. At the Porto Social Summit to be held on 7-8 May 2021 the action plan will be one of the major inputs into discussions on the social aspects of medium- to long-term recovery from the coronavirus crisis, including unemployment, education and training, social protection and poverty. The objectives include clarifying issues around: the enforceability of the social pillar's principles and rights, how to achieve a genuine European social protection floor for all, and governance, monitoring and funding in the context of the EU social dimension.

First Recovery and Resilience Dialogue with the European Commission

07-05-2021

Vice-President Dombrovskis and Commissioner Gentiloni have been invited to the first Recovery and Resilience Dialogue under the Recovery and Resilience Facility Regulation. This briefing addresses the following subjects: the Recovery and Resilience Facility and its scrutiny; the framework for defining and assessing Recovery and Resilience Plans and the procedures and timelines for their adoption; the financing of the Facility; data on the current economic situation and some estimates on the impact ...

Vice-President Dombrovskis and Commissioner Gentiloni have been invited to the first Recovery and Resilience Dialogue under the Recovery and Resilience Facility Regulation. This briefing addresses the following subjects: the Recovery and Resilience Facility and its scrutiny; the framework for defining and assessing Recovery and Resilience Plans and the procedures and timelines for their adoption; the financing of the Facility; data on the current economic situation and some estimates on the impact of Facility. Five annexes present, respectively, a timeline of the Facility; the state of play with national plans; economic data; the European Semester roadmap and survey data on involvement of national parliaments in the Facility.

Research for CULT Committee - Europe’s media in the digital decade - An action plan to support recovery and transformation in the news media sector

07-05-2021

The Media Action Plan released by the European Commission in December 2020 is the first policy document explicitly setting out a vision and dedicated initiatives for the news media sector. This paper discusses the current situation of the sector and its revenue streams, the important impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the main public and private funding models to support the sector.

The Media Action Plan released by the European Commission in December 2020 is the first policy document explicitly setting out a vision and dedicated initiatives for the news media sector. This paper discusses the current situation of the sector and its revenue streams, the important impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the main public and private funding models to support the sector.

Externe Autor

KEA European Affairs: Arthur LE GALL

Veröffentlicht am 06-05-2021

The impact of teleworking and digital work on workers and society

06-05-2021

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy ...

The study analyses recent trends in teleworking, its impacts on workers, employers, and society, and the challenges for policy-making. It provides an overview of the main legislative and policy measures adopted at EU and national level, in order to identify possible policy actions at EU level. The study is based on an extensive literature review, a web survey, interviews with representatives of European and national stakeholders, and five case studies of EU countries: Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy and Romania.

Externe Autor

Manuela SAMEK LODOVICI et al.

Digital markets act

06-05-2021

In December 2020, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on contestable and fair markets in the digital sector, otherwise referred to as the digital markets act (DMA). The proposed legislation lays down harmonised rules aimed at regulating the behaviour of digital platforms acting as gatekeepers between business users and their customers in the European Union (EU). This approach entails a shift from ex-post anti-trust intervention to ex-ante regulation, and would enshrine within ...

In December 2020, the European Commission published a proposal for a regulation on contestable and fair markets in the digital sector, otherwise referred to as the digital markets act (DMA). The proposed legislation lays down harmonised rules aimed at regulating the behaviour of digital platforms acting as gatekeepers between business users and their customers in the European Union (EU). This approach entails a shift from ex-post anti-trust intervention to ex-ante regulation, and would enshrine within EU law a set of ex-ante rules that would radically change how large digital platforms are allowed to operate in the EU. While there seems to be strong support for this approach in the EU, a number of issues regarding the designation of gatekeepers, the design of ex-ante obligations and prohibitions, and enforcement mechanisms have already been raised. As the EU lawmakers, Parliament and Council will now assess whether the Commission's proposal is an appropriate response to the challenges identified and work towards defining their positions on the proposal. First edition. 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

A statute for European cross-border associations and non-profit organisations

06-05-2021

The study examines the potential EU added value of the policy options (encouraging cross-border transactions, enhancing social outcomes and increasing economic contributions) as well as the drawbacks. In addition, the assessment highlights supporting non-legislative measures that could promote specific NPO functions in the EU.

The study examines the potential EU added value of the policy options (encouraging cross-border transactions, enhancing social outcomes and increasing economic contributions) as well as the drawbacks. In addition, the assessment highlights supporting non-legislative measures that could promote specific NPO functions in the EU.

Externe Autor

Anheier, Helmut K.

Investing in destabilisation: How foreign money is used to undermine democracy in the EU

06-05-2021

Foreign interference has become a major security threat for democracies. The European Union (EU) provides no exception and, in the last few years, has significantly stepped up its efforts to counter this threat. A specific type of foreign interference is the foreign funding of political parties. At the national level, regulations banning or limiting foreign funding are currently in place in most member states, but there is still significant variation across them. At the EU level, the recent reforms ...

Foreign interference has become a major security threat for democracies. The European Union (EU) provides no exception and, in the last few years, has significantly stepped up its efforts to counter this threat. A specific type of foreign interference is the foreign funding of political parties. At the national level, regulations banning or limiting foreign funding are currently in place in most member states, but there is still significant variation across them. At the EU level, the recent reforms of the regulation on the funding of the Europarties and their associated foundations have banned contributions from abroad. Notwithstanding such welcome changes to party regulations, cases of foreign funding are still being reported in several member states, with foreign actors exploiting regulatory loopholes to channel funds or provide other types of support. To tackle this issue more effectively, regulatory convergence at the national level should be promoted, the transparency of party accounts should be enhanced, and the monitoring and sanctioning powers of the relevant control authorities strengthened.

Externe Autor

Edoardo BRESSANELLI

Country-Specific Recommendations for 2019 and 2020 - A tabular comparison and an overview of implementation

06-05-2021

This document presents: • The 2019 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 5 June 2019 and adopted by the Council on 9 July 2019 and • The European Commission’s assessments of the implementation of the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations based on its Country Reports published on 27 February 2019. • The 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018

This document presents: • The 2019 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 5 June 2019 and adopted by the Council on 9 July 2019 and • The European Commission’s assessments of the implementation of the 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations based on its Country Reports published on 27 February 2019. • The 2018 Country-Specific Recommendations proposed by the European Commission on 23 May 2018 and adopted by the Council on 13 July 2018

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