ThinkTank logo De documenten die bijdragen aan de vormgeving van nieuwe EU-wetgeving
Gepubliceerd op 19-10-2021

European Banks’ Response to COVID-19 “Quick Fix” Regulation and Other Measures

31-10-2021

The original full study presents data from 27 banking groups in 10 EU Member States, where it is found that banks have used COVID-19 relief measures extensively, with some cross-country differences as for the intensity of use. Flexibility in risk classification does not seem to have impaired banks’ ability to report and recognise risk properly, even for loans under moratoria. The findings suggest that the impact of the measures on banks’ credit supply has been overall positive and mainly driven ...

The original full study presents data from 27 banking groups in 10 EU Member States, where it is found that banks have used COVID-19 relief measures extensively, with some cross-country differences as for the intensity of use. Flexibility in risk classification does not seem to have impaired banks’ ability to report and recognise risk properly, even for loans under moratoria. The findings suggest that the impact of the measures on banks’ credit supply has been overall positive and mainly driven by capital-enhancing measures such as the “Quick fix”.

Externe auteur

Brunella BRUNO, Filippo DE MARCO

Lobbying and foreign influence

19-10-2021

Lobbying and foreign influence are normal, integrated activities in modern public policy-making and geopolitics. When these influencing activities are covert or illicit in nature, however, they can be damaging to public image and levels of public trust in our democratic societies and their institutions, including those of the EU. Although not a modern concept, the frequency and extent of covert influence activities by third countries have been increasing since the mid-2010s. In the EU, this has taken ...

Lobbying and foreign influence are normal, integrated activities in modern public policy-making and geopolitics. When these influencing activities are covert or illicit in nature, however, they can be damaging to public image and levels of public trust in our democratic societies and their institutions, including those of the EU. Although not a modern concept, the frequency and extent of covert influence activities by third countries have been increasing since the mid-2010s. In the EU, this has taken the form of disinformation attacks on the EU, hidden agendas pushed by foreign funded academic think-tanks and funding of Member State political parties by authoritarian regimes, all with the aim of undermining the legitimate decision-making processes and political structures in and of the EU. The term foreign interference is often utilised to differentiate between legitimate influencing activities, such as diplomatic relations, and activities with the intention to disrupt. As this is not an exact science, however, it is also often difficult to distinguish between foreign influence and foreign interference activities. While interference tactics are often coercive, covert, deceptive, and clandestine in nature, influence activities can be made more transparent, thereby making it easier to differentiate between interference and the more legitimate influence activities. In light of the aforementioned growing foreign interference efforts, the EU considers foreign interference tactics as a serious threat and is taking steps to monitor and mitigate them, by, for example, setting up specific bodies or committees, especially in the context of EU elections. In parallel, the EU is also trying to improve the transparency of foreign influence activities. One such measure is broadening the scope of the Transparency Register, a public database of the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission, for the registration of transparent and ethical interest representation activities. According to the latest OECD report on lobbying, only three OECD nations (the USA, Australia and Canada) have rules in place that cover foreign influence. On the back of a new Interinstitutional Agreement (IIA) on a mandatory Transparency Register, however, the EU looks set to join those three nations.

Don't let up - The EU needs to maintain high standards for its banking sector as the European economy emerges from the Covid-19 pandemic

18-10-2021

The European banking system has weathered the pandemic reasonably well with the help of government intervention and economic support. Going forward, the EU should ensure the financial sector remains resilient by implementing the Basel III capital requirements in full, monitoring effects of the digital transition, and continuing to hold banks to high standards.

The European banking system has weathered the pandemic reasonably well with the help of government intervention and economic support. Going forward, the EU should ensure the financial sector remains resilient by implementing the Basel III capital requirements in full, monitoring effects of the digital transition, and continuing to hold banks to high standards.

Externe auteur

Rebecca CHRISTIE, Monika GRZEGORCZYK

Impediments to resolvability – what is the status quo?

18-10-2021

To efficiently resolve a bank that is failing or likely to fail, and for which resolution is deemed in the public interest, it is important that impediments that hamper its resolvability are removed. Noting the limited public disclosure of banks and the Single Resolution Board (SRB), this paper assesses improvements in resolvability of a sample of 72 eurozone banks based on some key indicators. The main findings suggest that resolvability has marginally improved since the SRB resumed its full legal ...

To efficiently resolve a bank that is failing or likely to fail, and for which resolution is deemed in the public interest, it is important that impediments that hamper its resolvability are removed. Noting the limited public disclosure of banks and the Single Resolution Board (SRB), this paper assesses improvements in resolvability of a sample of 72 eurozone banks based on some key indicators. The main findings suggest that resolvability has marginally improved since the SRB resumed its full legal mandate in 2016, which is in line with earlier statements of the SRB characterising the process to make banks resolvable as a ‘marathon’.

Externe auteur

M. Bodellini, W.P. De Groen

Country Specific Recommendations and Recovery and Resilience Plans - Thematic overview on tax avoidance, money laundering and corruption issues

18-10-2021

This paper outlines how 2019 and 2020 Country Specific Recommendations covering the fight against corruption, aggressive tax planning, tax evasion or tax avoidance or ineffective anti-money laundering measures are being addressed in national Recovery and Resilience Plans, based on Commission’s assessments. The paper will be updated once new relevant information is available.

This paper outlines how 2019 and 2020 Country Specific Recommendations covering the fight against corruption, aggressive tax planning, tax evasion or tax avoidance or ineffective anti-money laundering measures are being addressed in national Recovery and Resilience Plans, based on Commission’s assessments. The paper will be updated once new relevant information is available.

Reporting Obligations Regarding Gender Equality and Equal Pay State of play among Member States and avenues for upgrading and implementing legal sanctions towards companies

18-10-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an in-depth analysis of the policy and legal state-of-the-art concerning gender pay discrimination in the European Union. To this end, it builds on a comprehensive comparative study covering European countries (i.e., Italy, France, Germany, Denmark, Iceland, and Spain), in order to conclusively design and develop specific policy recommendations ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee, provides an in-depth analysis of the policy and legal state-of-the-art concerning gender pay discrimination in the European Union. To this end, it builds on a comprehensive comparative study covering European countries (i.e., Italy, France, Germany, Denmark, Iceland, and Spain), in order to conclusively design and develop specific policy recommendations to move towards a shared and well-informed solution to wage discrimination in the EU, especially in light of the European Commission's recently adopted proposal for a Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive (CSRD).

Externe auteur

Paola PROFETA, Maria Lucia PASSADO, Ximena CALÓ

Gepubliceerd op 18-10-2021

The concept of 'climate refugee': Towards a possible definition

18-10-2021

According to statistics published by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, since 2008 over 318 million people around the world have been forcibly displaced by floods, windstorms, earthquakes or droughts, 30.7 million in 2020 alone. This is equivalent to one person being displaced every second. Depending on the frequency and scale of the major natural disasters occurring, there are significant fluctuations in the total number of displaced people from one year to the next, yet the trend over ...

According to statistics published by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, since 2008 over 318 million people around the world have been forcibly displaced by floods, windstorms, earthquakes or droughts, 30.7 million in 2020 alone. This is equivalent to one person being displaced every second. Depending on the frequency and scale of the major natural disasters occurring, there are significant fluctuations in the total number of displaced people from one year to the next, yet the trend over recent decades has been a growing one. Many find refuge within their own country, but some are forced to go abroad. In the summer of 2021, Europe witnessed heavy and unprecedented flooding, particularly in Belgium and Germany, and heat domes in the Mediterranean region. Scientists relate this directly to climate change. All things considered, the number of 'climate refugees' looks set to rise. So far, the national and international response to this challenge has been limited, and protection for the people affected remains inadequate. What adds further to the gap in protection of such people – who are often described as 'climate refugees' – is that there is neither a clear definition of this category of people, nor are they covered by the 1951 Refugee Convention. The latter extends only to people who have a well-founded fear of being persecuted because of their race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion, and who are unable or unwilling to seek protection from their home countries. While the EU has not so far recognised climate refugees formally, it has expressed growing concern and has taken action to support the countries potentially affected by climate-related stress and help them develop resilience. This briefing is an update of an earlier one from January 2019.

Gepubliceerd op 15-10-2021

Current membership of the European Council October 2021

15-10-2021

The European Council consists of the 27 Heads of State or Government of the EU Member States, who are voting members, together with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission, who have no vote (Article 15(2) TEU). The chart shows the current members, the national office they hold and their political affiliation, as well as the year their membership of the institution began. This publication is updated periodically to reflect changes in the European Council's ...

The European Council consists of the 27 Heads of State or Government of the EU Member States, who are voting members, together with the President of the European Council and the President of the European Commission, who have no vote (Article 15(2) TEU). The chart shows the current members, the national office they hold and their political affiliation, as well as the year their membership of the institution began. This publication is updated periodically to reflect changes in the European Council's membership.

Youth in Europe: Effects of COVID-19 on their economic and social situation

12-10-2021

The full study analyses the effects of COVID-19 on youth unemployment, inactivity, work-based learning and mental health. The analysis is based on quantitative indicators and qualitative information from surveys and policy documents. It discusses the probability of long-term 'scarring effects', comparing the impact of the current crisis to that of the 2008/2009 global financial crisis and its aftermath

The full study analyses the effects of COVID-19 on youth unemployment, inactivity, work-based learning and mental health. The analysis is based on quantitative indicators and qualitative information from surveys and policy documents. It discusses the probability of long-term 'scarring effects', comparing the impact of the current crisis to that of the 2008/2009 global financial crisis and its aftermath

Updating the framework for the safety of non-food consumer products on the internal market

15-10-2021

This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal for a regulation on general product safety aimed at ensuring that EU consumers are protected from dangerous non-food products. The IA defines clearly the problems to be addressed and their analysis appears to be satisfactory but the description of how they would evolve without any EU intervention is limited. The IA does not compare the retained options in terms ...

This briefing provides an initial analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the impact assessment (IA) accompanying the Commission proposal for a regulation on general product safety aimed at ensuring that EU consumers are protected from dangerous non-food products. The IA defines clearly the problems to be addressed and their analysis appears to be satisfactory but the description of how they would evolve without any EU intervention is limited. The IA does not compare the retained options in terms of efficiency, and proportionality. The IA appears to have done a convincing analysis of the economic and social impacts of the options retained for assessment. The IA includes a very comprehensive reports of the consultations held, specifically referring to the received feedback in several parts of the report. Overall, the analysis carried out in the IA appears to be well grounded. The IA appears to have addressed the RSB's comments. The proposal appears to be largely consistent with the analysis provided in the IA.

Toekomstige activiteiten

25-10-2021
European Gender Equality Week - October 25-28, 2021
Diverse activiteiten -
FEMM AFET DROI SEDE DEVE BUDG CONT ECON EMPL ITRE TRAN AGRI PECH CULT JURI PETI
25-10-2021
Ninth meeting of the Joint Parliamentary Scrutiny Group on Europol, 25-26 October
Diverse activiteiten -
LIBE
26-10-2021
Investment Policy and Investment Protection Reform
Hoorzitting -
INTA

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